Latest & greatest articles for acetaminophen

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Top results for acetaminophen

121. Acetaminophen, aspirin, and chronic renal failure. (PubMed)

Acetaminophen, aspirin, and chronic renal failure. Several epidemiologic studies have demonstrated an association between heavy consumption of nonnarcotic analgesics and the occurrence of chronic renal failure, but it is unclear which is the cause and which is the effectIn a nationwide, population-based, case-control study of early-stage chronic renal failure in Sweden, face-to-face interviews were conducted with 926 patients with newly diagnosed renal failure and 998 control subjects, of whom (...) 918 and 980, respectively, had complete data. We used logistic-regression models to estimate the relative risks of disease-specific types of chronic renal failure associated with the use of various analgesicsAspirin and acetaminophen were used regularly by 37 percent and 25 percent, respectively, of the patients with renal failure and by 19 percent and 12 percent, respectively, of the controls. Regular use of either drug in the absence of the other was associated with an increase by a factor

2001 NEJM

122. Treatment of pain or fever with paracetamol (acetaminophen) in the alcoholic patient: a systematic review

Treatment of pain or fever with paracetamol (acetaminophen) in the alcoholic patient: a systematic review Treatment of pain or fever with paracetamol (acetaminophen) in the alcoholic patient: a systematic review Treatment of pain or fever with paracetamol (acetaminophen) in the alcoholic patient: a systematic review Dart R C, Kuffner E K, Rumack B H Authors' objectives To evaluate whether the administration of therapeutic doses of paracetamol cause hepatic injury in the alcoholic patient (...) with long-term use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents. Research: The authors did not state any implications for further research. Bibliographic details Dart R C, Kuffner E K, Rumack B H. Treatment of pain or fever with paracetamol (acetaminophen) in the alcoholic patient: a systematic review. American Journal of Therapeutics 2000; 7(2): 123-134 PubMedID Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by NLM MeSH Acetaminophen /adverse effects; Alcoholism /complications; Analgesics, Non-Narcotic

2000 DARE.

123. Acetaminophen ingestion in childhood: cost and relative risk of alternative referral strategies

Acetaminophen ingestion in childhood: cost and relative risk of alternative referral strategies Acetaminophen ingestion in childhood: cost and relative risk of alternative referral strategies Acetaminophen ingestion in childhood: cost and relative risk of alternative referral strategies Bond G R, Krenzelok E P, Normann S A, Tendler J D, Morriskukoski C L, Mccoy D J,Thompson M W, McCarthy T, Roblez J, Taylor C, Dolan M A, Requa R K, Curry S C Record Status This is a critical abstract (...) of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology Management of acetaminophen ingestion in childhood. Type of intervention Treatment. Economic study type Cost-effectiveness analysis. Study population Children who ingested acetaminophen, aged one to six years and referred

1994 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

124. Comparison of an antiinflammatory dose of ibuprofen, an analgesic dose of ibuprofen, and acetaminophen in the treatment of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. (PubMed)

Comparison of an antiinflammatory dose of ibuprofen, an analgesic dose of ibuprofen, and acetaminophen in the treatment of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. The optimal short-term, symptomatic therapy for osteoarthritis of the knee has not been fully determined. Accordingly, we compared the efficacy of a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, ibuprofen, given in either an antiinflammatory dose (high dose) or an analgesic dose (low dose), with that of acetaminophen, a pure analgesic.In (...) a randomized, double-blind trial, 184 patients with chronic knee pain due to osteoarthritis were given either 2400 or 1200 mg of ibuprofen per day or 4000 mg of acetaminophen per day. They were evaluated after a washout period of three to seven days before the beginning of the study, and again after four weeks of treatment. The major measures of outcome included scores on the pain and disability scales of the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire (range of possible scores, 0 to 3), scores on the visual

1991 NEJM

125. Gastrointestinal blood loss. Effect of aspirin, fenoprofen, and acetaminophen in rheumatoid arthritis as determined by sequential gastroscopy and radioactive fecal markers. (PubMed)

Gastrointestinal blood loss. Effect of aspirin, fenoprofen, and acetaminophen in rheumatoid arthritis as determined by sequential gastroscopy and radioactive fecal markers. The feasibility of determining the exact site and amount of drug-induced gastric bleeding was tested. Fourteen patients with rheumatoid arthritis received equivalent therapeutic doses of the antinflammatory drugs aspirin, 4 gm/day, and fenoprofen calcium, 2.4 gm/day, in randomized order for seven days. Acetaminophen (...) was given for 14 days just prior to each of these periods. By fiberoptic gastroscopy, antral ulceration and acute mucosal lesions were found in seven patients following aspirin ingestion, in one taking fenoprofen, and in none taking acetaminophen. Fecal blood loss in four-day stool collections, quantitated by autologous chromium 51-labeled erythrocytes shed into the stool averaged 5.0 ml/day while taking aspirin, 2.2 ml/day while taking fenoprofen calcium, and 0.8 ml/day while taking acetaminophen

1977 JAMA

126. Controlled trial of cysteamine in treatment of acute paracetamol (acetaminophen) poisoning. (PubMed)

Controlled trial of cysteamine in treatment of acute paracetamol (acetaminophen) poisoning. A randomised controlled trial of the use of intravenous cysteamine in the treatment of severe paracetamol poisoning has been performed. Thirty-eight patients presenting 3-17 h after ingestion were admitted to the trial; of these eighteen received cysteamine. Two patients died from hepatic failure, one in each treatment group. Analysis of the series as a whole showed no advantage of cysteamine

1976 Lancet