Latest & greatest articles for acne

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This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on acne and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Acne treatment and clinical papers

Acne is a common skin condition characterised by whiteheads (or blackheads), pimples and oily skin. It can lead to possible scarring. It is typically caused when hair follicles become inflamed and the sebaceous glands in the skin are overactive. The over production of sebum and a combination of dead skin cells and dirt can clog follicles and pores causing a break out. Acne can affect any age group but it’s more common in adolescents.

There are many ways to treat acne depending on the severity of the case. Treatments include a range of medications such as topical retinoids, antibiotics and in severe cases isotretinoin is prescribed. Research is ongoing to determine the side effects and harms caused by these drugs. Clinical trials and studies are vital to assess treatment.

The Trip Database has an extensive collection of articles on acne ranging from clinical trials, systematic reviews, clinical guidelines and case reports. These can be found via searching the site.

Top results for acne

81. Acne best practice management

Acne best practice management 656 Reprinted from Aust RAli An F Amily Physici An Vol. 39, n o. 9, se Ptembe R 2010 David Cook George Krassas Tom Huang Acne Best practice management Background Acne vulgaris can have a substantial impact on a patient’s quality of life; there can be significant psychosocial consequences and it can leave permanent physical scarring. Early and effective acne treatment is important. Objective To describe the outcome of an accredited clinical audit investigating (...) general practitioner management of acne vulgaris and to provide an outline of current ‘best practice’ acne management. Discussion The audit was conducted over two cycles with GPs receiving educational material between cycles. Eighty-five GPs contributed data on 1638 patients. General practitioner management of acne was assessed against a set of preset standards and some acne treatment was found to be inconsistent with best practice, particularly for patients with moderate and moderate to severe acne

2010 The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners

82. Advice on the safe introduction and continued use of isotretinoin in acne in the UK

Advice on the safe introduction and continued use of isotretinoin in acne in the UK GUIDELINES BJD British Journal of Dermatology Advice on the safe introduction and continued use of isotretinoin in acne in the U.K. 2010 M.J.D. Good?eld, N.H. Cox,* A. Bowser, J.C. McMillan, L.G. Millard,§ N.B. Simpson– and A.D. Ormerod** Department of Dermatology, Leeds General In?rmary, Leeds LS1 3EX, U.K. *Department of Dermatology, Cumberland In?rmary, Carlisle CA2 7HY, U.K. Independent Acne Patient Advisor (...) words adverse effects, depression, isotretinoin, pregnancy prevention plan, safe use, teratogen Con?icts of interest M.J.D.G. (Chair) has received no direct or indirect sponsorship from either of the companies that supply isotretinoin. The Department in which he works has received both speci?c and nonspeci?c sponsorship for research from Roche in the past. The late N.H.C. received sponsorship from Roche to attend nontargeted educational meetings. A.B. is Chief Executive of the Acne Support Group

2010 British Association of Dermatologists

83. The use of salicylic acid in a new delivery system as a co-adjuvant topical treatment for acne vulgaris. (PubMed)

The use of salicylic acid in a new delivery system as a co-adjuvant topical treatment for acne vulgaris. Topical preparations in the form of creams or ointments are the usual treatment for acne. These agents do not seem to penetrate the skin barrier deeply enough to produce the desired effect.We conducted a randomized, double-blinded, prospective study to evaluate the effectiveness of salicylic acid in a new delivery system, the Crown Carrier System (CCS, Trivitaderm LLC, Asheville, NC (...) ) for the treatment of acne.Thirty-seven patients with homogenous backgrounds were randomly divided into 3 groups. Group A was treated with salicylic acid in CCS, Group B was treated with CCS without salicylic acid, and Group C received salicylic acid alone. Patients were evaluated at 2 weeks and 8 weeks post-treatment.Twenty-five patients completed the evaluation. Most patients in Group A presented with no changes in the number of acne lesions but with significant improvement of inflammatory signs. Their overall

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2009 Aesthetic surgery journal Controlled trial quality: uncertain

84. Laser and other light therapies for the treatment of acne vulgaris: systematic review

Laser and other light therapies for the treatment of acne vulgaris: systematic review Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2009 DARE.

85. Detecting implausible social network effects in acne, height, and headaches: longitudinal analysis. (PubMed)

Detecting implausible social network effects in acne, height, and headaches: longitudinal analysis. To investigate whether "network effects" can be detected for health outcomes that are unlikely to be subject to network phenomena.Statistical analysis common in network studies, such as logistic regression analysis, controlled for own and friend's lagged health status. Analyses controlled for environmental confounders.Subsamples of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health (...) ).4300 to 5400 male and female adolescents who nominated a friend in the dataset and who were both longitudinally surveyed. Measurements Health outcomes, including headache severity, acne severity, and height self reported by respondents in 1994-5, 1995-6, and 2000-1.Significant network effects were observed in the acquisition of acne, headaches, and height. A friend's acne problems increased an individual's odds of acne problems (odds ratio 1.62, 95% confidence interval 0.91 to 2.89). The likelihood

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2008 BMJ

86. An aqueous gel fixed combination of clindamycin phosphate 1.2% and benzoyl peroxide 2.5% for the once-daily treatment of moderate to severe acne vulgaris: Assessment of efficacy and safety in 2813 patients (PubMed)

An aqueous gel fixed combination of clindamycin phosphate 1.2% and benzoyl peroxide 2.5% for the once-daily treatment of moderate to severe acne vulgaris: Assessment of efficacy and safety in 2813 patients We sought to evaluate efficacy, safety, and tolerability of a combination of clindamycin phosphate 1.2% and benzoyl peroxide 2.5% (clindamycin-BPO 2.5%) aqueous gel in moderate to severe acne vulgaris.A total of 2813 patients, aged 12 years or older, were randomized to receive clindamycin-BPO (...) 2.5%, individual active ingredients, or vehicle in two identical, double-blind, controlled 12-week, 4-arm studies evaluating safety and efficacy (inflammatory and noninflammatory lesion counts) using Evaluator Global Severity Score and subject self-assessment.Clindamycin-BPO 2.5% demonstrated statistical superiority to individual active ingredients and vehicle in reducing both inflammatory and noninflammatory lesions and acne severity. Visibly greater improvement was observed by patients

2008 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

87. Evidence-based review of lasers, light sources and photodynamic therapy in the treatment of acne vulgaris

Evidence-based review of lasers, light sources and photodynamic therapy in the treatment of acne vulgaris Evidence-based review of lasers, light sources and photodynamic therapy in the treatment of acne vulgaris Evidence-based review of lasers, light sources and photodynamic therapy in the treatment of acne vulgaris Haedersdal M, Togsverd-Bo K, Wulf H C CRD summary This review investigated the efficacy and safety of optical treatments for acne vulgaris. The authors concluded that the treatments (...) had short-term efficacy. Photodynamic therapy had the most consistent outcomes. Poor reporting of the review process and limitations in the included studies precluded a thorough evaluation of the reliability of the authors' conclusions. Authors' objectives To assess the efficacy and adverse effects of optical treatments of acne vulgaris. Searching PubMed and The Cochrane Library were searched in March 2007 for relevant studies in the English language. Search terms were reported. Reference lists

2008 DARE.

88. Adapalene-benzoyl peroxide, a fixed-dose combination for the treatment of acne vulgaris: results of a multicenter, randomized double-blind, controlled study. (PubMed)

Adapalene-benzoyl peroxide, a fixed-dose combination for the treatment of acne vulgaris: results of a multicenter, randomized double-blind, controlled study. BACKGROUND: A fixed-dose combination gel with adapalene 0.1% and benzoyl peroxide (BPO) 2.5% has been developed for the once-daily treatment of acne. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of adapalene 0.1% -BPO 2.5% fixed combination gel (adapalene-BPO) for the treatment of acne. METHODS: A total of 517 subjects were randomized (...) tolerability profile for adapalene-BPO were similar to adapalene monotherapy. LIMITATIONS: These data were generated in a controlled trial. Results obtained in clinical practice could differ. CONCLUSIONS: The fixed-dose combination of adapalene and BPO provides significantly greater efficacy for the treatment of acne vulgaris as early as week 1 relative to monotherapies, with a comparable safety profile to adapalene.

2007 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: predicted high

89. Acne.

Acne. Guidelines and Measures | Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality HHS.gov Search ahrq.gov Search ahrq.gov Menu Topics A - Z Healthcare Delivery Latest available findings on quality of and access to health care Searchable database of AHRQ Grants, Working Papers & HHS Recovery Act Projects AHRQ Projects funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Trust Fund You are here Guidelines and Measures Funding for the National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC) has ended. Learn more about

2007 Finnish Medical Society Duodecim

90. Topical and oral CAM in acne: a review of the empirical evidence and a consideration of its context

Topical and oral CAM in acne: a review of the empirical evidence and a consideration of its context Topical and oral CAM in acne: a review of the empirical evidence and a consideration of its context Topical and oral CAM in acne: a review of the empirical evidence and a consideration of its context Magin P J, Adams J, Pond C D, Smith W CRD summary This review examined topical and oral complementary and alternative treatments for acne. The authors concluded that the evidence base was limited (...) ; this reflects the poor quality of most of the included studies. The review methodology was poorly reported and the reliability of the review's conclusions is therefore unclear. Authors' objectives To examine the efficacy of different methods of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in the treatment of acne. Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, DARE and the Cochrane Library were searched using the reported search terms. The dates of the search were not reported. The reference lists of identified articles

2006 DARE.

91. Randomised controlled multiple treatment comparison to provide a cost-effectiveness rationale for the selection of antimicrobial therapy in acne

Randomised controlled multiple treatment comparison to provide a cost-effectiveness rationale for the selection of antimicrobial therapy in acne Randomised controlled multiple treatment comparison to provide a cost-effectiveness rationale for the selection of antimicrobial therapy in acne Randomised controlled multiple treatment comparison to provide a cost-effectiveness rationale for the selection of antimicrobial therapy in acne Ozolins M, Eady E A, Avery A, Cunliffe W J, O'Neill C, Simpson N (...) B, et al Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Ozolins M, Eady E A, Avery A, Cunliffe W J, O'Neill C, Simpson N B, et al. Randomised controlled multiple treatment comparison to provide a cost-effectiveness rationale for the selection of antimicrobial therapy in acne. Health Technology Assessment 2005; 9(1): 1-212 Authors

2005 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

92. Depression and suicidal behavior in acne patients treated with isotretinoin: a systematic review

Depression and suicidal behavior in acne patients treated with isotretinoin: a systematic review Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2005 DARE.

93. A systematic review of the evidence for 'myths and misconceptions' in acne management: diet, face-washing and sunlight

A systematic review of the evidence for 'myths and misconceptions' in acne management: diet, face-washing and sunlight Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2005 DARE.

94. Randomised controlled multiple treatment comparison to provide a cost-effectiveness rationale for the selection of antimicrobial therapy in acne

Randomised controlled multiple treatment comparison to provide a cost-effectiveness rationale for the selection of antimicrobial therapy in acne Randomised controlled multiple treatment comparison to provide a cost-effectiveness rationale for the selection of antimicrobial therapy in acne Journals Library An error has occurred in processing the XML document An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you

2005 NIHR HTA programme

95. Comparison of five antimicrobial regimens for treatment of mild to moderate inflammatory facial acne vulgaris in the community: randomised controlled trial. (PubMed)

Comparison of five antimicrobial regimens for treatment of mild to moderate inflammatory facial acne vulgaris in the community: randomised controlled trial. We investigated the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of five antimicrobial regimens for mild to moderate facial acne and whether propionibacterial antibiotic resistance affects treatment response.In this randomised, observer-masked trial, 649 community participants were allocated one of five antibacterial regimens. Primary outcomes were

2004 Lancet Controlled trial quality: predicted high

96. Treatment of acne vulgaris. (PubMed)

Treatment of acne vulgaris. Management of acne vulgaris by nondermatologists is increasing. Current understanding of the different presentations of acne allows for individualized treatments and improved outcomes.To review the best evidence available for individualized treatment of acne.Search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane database to search for all English-language articles on acne treatment from 1966 to 2004.Well-designed randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, and other systematic (...) reviews are the focus of this article.Acne literature is characterized by a lack of standardization with respect to outcome measures and methods used to grade disease severity.Main outcome measures of 29 randomized double-blind trials that were evaluated included reductions in inflammatory, noninflammatory, and total acne lesion counts. Topical retinoids reduce the number of comedones and inflammatory lesions in the range of 40% to 70%. These agents are the mainstay of therapy in patients

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2004 JAMA

97. Treatment of acne vulgaris with a pulsed dye laser: a randomized controlled trial. (PubMed)

Treatment of acne vulgaris with a pulsed dye laser: a randomized controlled trial. The high prevalence of acne vulgaris and its significant morbidity underscore the need for convenient, low-risk, and efficacious therapy. Treatment with various lasers has been reported to improve acne.To evaluate the clinical efficacy of pulsed dye laser therapy in the treatment of acne.Randomized, single-blind, controlled, split-face clinical trial of a volunteer sample of 40 patients aged 13 years or older (...) with facial acne conducted at an academic referral center from August 2002 to September 2003.One or 2 nonpurpuric pulsed dye laser treatments to half of the face (fluence of 3 J/cm2), serial blinded clinical assessments (lesion counts), and grading of acne severity using standardized bilateral serial photographs.Comparison of the changes in lesion counts from baseline to 12 weeks between treated and untreated sides of the face and changes in photographic evidence of acne severity as graded by a panel

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2004 JAMA Controlled trial quality: uncertain

98. Comparison of five antimicrobial regimens for treatment of mild to moderate inflammatory facial acne vulgaris in the community: randomised controlled trial

Comparison of five antimicrobial regimens for treatment of mild to moderate inflammatory facial acne vulgaris in the community: randomised controlled trial Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2004 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

99. Pulsed-dye laser treatment for inflammatory acne vulgaris: randomised controlled trial. (PubMed)

Pulsed-dye laser treatment for inflammatory acne vulgaris: randomised controlled trial. Low-fluence (low irradiation energy density) pulsed-dye lasers (PDLs) have been used for atrophic acne scarring, and anecdotal experience suggests that long-term improvements in inflammatory acne can be seen after one PDL treatment. Our aim was to compare the efficacy and tolerability of such PDL treatment with sham treatment in patients with facial inflammatory acne in a double-blind, randomised controlled (...) trial.We recruited 41 adults with mild-to-moderate facial inflammatory acne. We randomly assigned patients to PDL (n=31) or sham treatment (n=10). Treatment was given at baseline and patients were seen after 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Assessors and participants were unaware of treatment allocations. Primary outcome measures were acne severity after 12 weeks and adverse events at any time. Secondary measures were change in lesion counts after 12 weeks and change in acne severity with time. Analysis

2003 Lancet Controlled trial quality: predicted high

100. High risk for hyperlipidemia and the metabolic syndrome after an episode of hypertriglyceridemia during 13-cis retinoic acid therapy for acne: a pharmacogenetic study. (PubMed)

High risk for hyperlipidemia and the metabolic syndrome after an episode of hypertriglyceridemia during 13-cis retinoic acid therapy for acne: a pharmacogenetic study. Administration of 13-cis retinoic acid (isotretinoin) for acne is occasionally accompanied by hyperlipidemia. It is not known why some persons develop this side effect.To determine whether isotretinoin triggers a familial susceptibility to hyperlipidemia and the metabolic syndrome.Cross-sectional comparison.University hospital (...) in Lausanne, Switzerland.102 persons in whom triglyceride levels increased at least 1.0 mmol/L (> or =89 mg/dL) (hyperresponders) and 100 persons in whom triglyceride levels changed 0.1 mmol/L (< or =9 mg/dL) or less (nonresponders) during isotretinoin therapy for acne. Parents of 71 hyperresponders and 60 nonresponders were also evaluated.Waist-to-hip ratio; fasting glucose, insulin, and lipid levels; and apoE genotype.Hyperresponders and nonresponders had similar pretreatment body weight and plasma

2002 Annals of Internal Medicine