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Top results for aids

181. The Epidrum for aiding access to the epidural space

The Epidrum for aiding access to the epidural space The Epidrum for aiding access to the epidur The Epidrum for aiding access to the epidural al space space Medtech innovation briefing Published: 2 March 2015 nice.org.uk/guidance/mib23 pathways Summary Summary The Epidrum is intended for use in combination with a luer syringe and an epidural needle. It is designed to give a visual signal when the epidural space is reached. Two randomised controlled trials found that the Epidrum reduced the time (...) for aiding access to the epidural space (MIB23) © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 2 of 24Introduction Introduction Of the 33 vertebrae in the spine, 24 have a central hole, called a foramen. The vertebrae are stacked on top of each other to form a column, and the foramina line up to create the spinal canal running through its centre. This spinal canal houses and protects the spinal cord. The outer layer

2015 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Advice

182. Quantitative Electroencephalography as a Diagnostic Aid for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Children

Quantitative Electroencephalography as a Diagnostic Aid for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Children Quantitative electroencephalography as a diagnostic aid for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children Quantitative electroencephalography as a diagnostic aid for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children BlueCross BlueShield Association Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality (...) of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation BlueCross BlueShield Association. Quantitative electroencephalography as a diagnostic aid for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children. Chicago: BlueCross BlueShield Association (BCBS). TEC Assessment 29(1). 2014 Authors' objectives The objective of this Assessment is to evaluate the use of QEEG as a diagnostic aid to confirm a clinical diagnosis of ADHD or the need for additional testing for ADHD. Authors' conclusions Correctly

2015 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

183. Rapid point of care combined Antigen/Antibody HIV test to aid in the diagnosis of HIV infection

Rapid point of care combined Antigen/Antibody HIV test to aid in the diagnosis of HIV infection 1 Public Summary Document Application No. 1391 – Rapid point-of-care combined Antigen/Antibody HIV test to aid in the diagnosis of HIV infection Applicant: ANZPI, Alere Pty Ltd Date of MSAC consideration: MSAC 64 th Meeting, 30-31 July 2015 Context for decision: MSAC makes its advice in accordance with its Terms of Reference, see at www.msac.gov.au. 1. Purpose of application and links to other (...) under the Community HIV Education and Prevention (CHEP) program. The Victorian PRONTO! Clinics also offer the test for free, in partnership with the Victorian AIDS Council and the Burnet Institute. The applicant stated that in clinics where no external funding arrangement exists, patients being tested currently pay for the test privately. One clinic reported that the cost associated with the test is $25 (for cost recovery). It is presumed that the funding arrangements in place for rapid point

2015 Medical Services Advisory Committee

184. Choosing how to birth your baby: A decision aid for women with a previous caesarean section

Choosing how to birth your baby: A decision aid for women with a previous caesarean section Choosing how to birth your baby: A decision aid for women with a previous caesarean sectionThis decision aid has been written to support women who have had one or more previous caesareans, to know what to expect and have a say in making decisions about the way they would like to birth. This decision aid provides information about two options: 1 Choose to have a vaginal birth after caesarean (VBAC) 2 (...) Choose to have a planned repeat caesarean section This decision aid will answer the following questions: » What are my options when choosing to birth my baby after a previous caesarean section? » What happens if I choose to have a vaginal birth after caesarean? » What happens if I choose to have a planned repeat caesarean section? » Will I always be able to choose? » How might I choose between a VBAC and a planned repeat caesarean section? » What are the differences between having a VBAC and having

2015 EUnetHTA

185. A decision aid for women aged 70 and older at their next screening mammogram

A decision aid for women aged 70 and older at their next screening mammogram Should I Continue Having Mammograms to Screen for Breast Cancer? A decision aid for women aged 70 and older at their next screening mammogram. AUSTRALIAN SCREENING MAMMOGRAPHY DECISION AID TRIAL 2 The University of Sydney Acknowledgement This decision aid was developed by members of the Screening and Test Evaluation Program (STEP) at the University of Sydney using the decision support format of the Ottawa Health (...) /documents/BFT_familyhistory.pdf, http://www.yourdiseaserisk.harvard.edu/english/ 21 References 1. Barratt A, Irwig L, Glasziou P, Salkeld G, Houssami H. (2002). Benefits, harms, and costs of screening mammography in women over 70 years of age: a systematic review. Medical Journal of Australia, 176(6):266-271. 2. Outcomes of screening: The estimates of outcomes of screening in this decision aid come from a mathematical model of mammography screening among women aged 40-84 years, based on Australian

2015 SickKids Supportive Care Guidelines

186. Choices about first trimester ultrasound scans: A decision aid for pregnant women

Choices about first trimester ultrasound scans: A decision aid for pregnant women Choices about first trimester ultrasound scans: A decision aid for pregnant womenThis decision aid has been written to support pregnant women to know what to expect and to have a say in making decisions about first trimester ultrasound scans. An ultrasound scan is when a small handheld device is used to create a picture of a woman’s uterus (womb) and baby during pregnancy. A first trimester ultrasound scan (...) is an ultrasound scan done in a woman’s first trimester of pregnancy (the first 14 weeks of a woman’s pregnancy). This decision aid provides information about two options: 1. Choosing not to have a first trimester ultrasound scan 2. Choosing to have a first trimester ultrasound scan This decision aid will answer the following questions: » What is an ultrasound scan? » Why might a first trimester ultrasound scan be offered? » What are my options? » What happens if I choose not to have a first trimester

2015 EUnetHTA

187. Choices about clamping your baby?s umbilical cord: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth

Choices about clamping your baby?s umbilical cord: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth Choices about clamping your baby’s umbilical cord: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birthThis decision aid has been written to support women having an actively managed third stage of labour to know what to expect and to have a say in making decisions about clamping their baby’s umbilical cord. An actively managed third stage of labour is when a woman is given Syntocinon® to help her birth (...) to have a physiological third stage, she will have active management of the third stage. If you haven’t chosen how you would like to birth your placenta or would like more information about choosing how to birth your placenta, you might like to read the decision aid ‘Choosing how to birth your placenta: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth.’ This decision aid does not apply to women having a physiological third stage of labour. This decision aid provides information about two options: 1

2015 EUnetHTA

188. Monitoring your baby during labour: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth

Monitoring your baby during labour: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth Monitoring your baby during labour A decision aid for women having a vaginal birthThis decision aid has been written to support women planning a vaginal birth to know what to expect, and to have a say in making decisions about how their baby will be monitored during labour and birth. This decision aid provides information about two options: 1. Choose to have intermittent monitoring 2. Choose to have continuous (...) monitoring This decision aid will answer the following questions: » What is monitoring? » Why might my baby be monitored during labour? » How can my baby be monitored during labour? » How accurate is monitoring? » What are my options? » What happens if I choose intermittent monitoring? » What happens if I choose continuous monitoring? » Will I always be able to choose? » How might I choose between intermittent monitoring and continuous monitoring? » What are the differences between intermittent

2015 EUnetHTA

189. Making Choices: A Decision Aid for Women with Breast Cancer. Deciding whether to join the SNAC2 trial

Making Choices: A Decision Aid for Women with Breast Cancer. Deciding whether to join the SNAC2 trial Deciding whether to join the SNAC2 trial (Sentinel Node Biopsy versus Axillary Clearance) A decision aid for women with breast cancerMaking Choices A Decision Aid for Women with Breast Cancer Deciding whether to join the SNAC2 trial (Sentinel Node Biopsy versus Axillary Clearance) © Centre for Medical Psychology & Evidence-based Decision-making (CeMPED), University of Sydney 2008. All rights (...) of Decision Aids. British Medical Journal 2003; 327:736-40. NBOCC. Recommendations for use of Sentinel node biopsy in early (operable) breast cancer – Clinical practice guidelines. National Breast and Ovarian Cancer Centre, 2008. Silberman AW, McVay C, Cohen JS. Comparative morbidity of axillary lymph node dissection and the sentinel lymph node technique. Annals of Surgery 2004; 240:1–6. Stebbing J, Delaney G, and Thompson A. Primary operable breast cancer: Sentinel node biopsy. BMJ Clinical Evidence 2006

2015 SickKids Supportive Care Guidelines

190. Using a bath or pool during first stage labour: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth

Using a bath or pool during first stage labour: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth Using a bath or pool during first stage labour: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birthThis decision aid has been written to support women who are wanting to have a vaginal birth to know what to expect and to have a say in making decisions about using a bath or pool during labour. This decision aid provides information about two options: 1. Not using a bath or pool during labour 2 Using (...) a bath or pool during labour This decision aid will also answer the following questions: » What is labour and what might it feel like? › What is first stage labour and what sort of pain might I experience? › What are Braxton Hicks contractions? › What is second stage labour and what sort of pain might I experience? › What is third stage labour and what sort of pain might I experience? » What are my choices for managing and working with pain? » What are my options for using a bath or pool in the first

2015 EUnetHTA

191. A decision aid for women considering further chemotherapy for refractory or resistant ovarian cancer

A decision aid for women considering further chemotherapy for refractory or resistant ovarian cancer Making a decision that’s right for you. A decision aid for women considering further chemotherapy for refractory or resistant ovarian cancer .Contents This booklet and you Summary of the different options available Coping with resistant and refractory ovarian cancer Goals of treatment for resistant and refractory ovarian cancer Understanding resistant and refractory ovarian cancer Palliative (...) : www.palliativecare.org.au Palliative Care Information Service (PCIS) Phone: 1800 772 273 Website: www.pcis.org.au Care Search – Palliative care knowledge network Website: www.caresearch.com.au Cancer Council – Website about palliative care www.cancercouncil.com.au/editorial.asp?pageid=1957 Asking Questions Can Help: An aid for people seeing the palliative care team by Dr Josephine Clayton, Prof. Phyllis Butow & Prof. Martin Tattersall, Medical Psychology Research Unit, University of Sydney, 2002 at: http

2015 SickKids Supportive Care Guidelines

192. Choices about epidural: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth

Choices about epidural: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth Choices about epidural: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birthThis decision aid has been written to support women who are planning a vaginal birth to know what to expect and to have a say in making decisions about an epidural. This decision aid provides information about two options: 1. Choose not to have an epidural 2. Choose to have an epidural This decision aid will also answer the following questions: » What (...) /babies and want to talk to someone, please call: » your family doctor » 13 HEALTH telephone line (13 432 584) » Lifeline counselling service (131 114) » Stillbirth and Neonatal Death Support (SANDS) helpline (1800 228 655) » Pregnancy, Birth & Baby Helpline (1800 882 436) 2 The research and development of this decision aid was conducted by Natasha Hayes, a health researcher at the Queensland Centre for Mothers & Babies, and updated by Aimée Dane, a health psychology researcher at the Queensland

2015 EUnetHTA

193. Choosing how to birth your placenta: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth

Choosing how to birth your placenta: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth Birthing your placenta Choosing how to birth your placenta: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth. This decision aid has been written to support women who have a vaginal birth to know what to expect and to have a say in making decisions about the third stage of labour. The third stage of labour (or just the third stage) is the time from when a woman births her baby to when she births her placenta (...) (or the afterbirth). This decision aid provides information about two options: 1. Choose to have a physiological third stage of labour 2. Choose to have an actively managed third stage of labour This decision aid will answer the following questions: » What is the placenta and what is third stage of labour? » How can I be cared for during the third stage? » What happens if I choose a physiological third stage? » What happens if I choose an actively managed third stage? » How might cord clamping and cutting affect

2015 EUnetHTA

194. A decision aid for women having their first baby and considering their choices for labour pain relief

A decision aid for women having their first baby and considering their choices for labour pain relief 1 PAIN RELIEF FOR LABOUR For women having their first baby 2 59 Please note: Research studies that support statements made in this book have been referenced by a number. The complete list of references is at the back of the book. All differences are statistically significant, see “More Information”. The information in this book is correct at the time of publication. However, as research (...) Epidemiologist Dr Lyndal Trevena General Practitioner, Epidemiologist Ms Camille Raynes-Greenow Epidemiologist Dr Kirsten McCaffery Health and Social Psychologist Ms Natasha Nassar Epidemiologist, Decision Aid expert Dr Emily Olive Obstetrician Ms Maree Reynolds Midwife Dr Daniela Eugster Anaesthetist Acknowledgement This decision aid was developed using the decision support format of the Ottawa Health Decision Centre at the University of Ottawa and Ottawa Health Research Institute, Ontario, Canada. Camille

2015 SickKids Supportive Care Guidelines

195. Choices about episiotomy: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth

Choices about episiotomy: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth Choices about episiotomy: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birthThis decision aid has been written to support women who are planning a vaginal birth to know what to expect and to have a say in making decisions about episiotomy (when a care provider uses scissors to make a cut to increase the size of the opening of the vagina). This decision aid provides information about two options: 1. Choosing not to have (...) an episiotomy 2. Choosing to have an episiotomy This decision aid will answer the following questions: » What happens during vaginal birth? » What can affect my chance of having a tear during vaginal birth? » What is an episiotomy? » What are my options? » What happens if I choose not to have an episiotomy? » What happens if I choose to have an episiotomy? » Will I always be able to choose? » How might I choose between not having and having an episiotomy? » What are the differences between selective use

2015 EUnetHTA

196. Choosing your positions during labour and birth: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth

Choosing your positions during labour and birth: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth Choosing your positions during labour and birth: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birthThis decision aid has been written to support women who are planning a vaginal birth to know what to expect and to have a say in making decisions about positions in labour and birth. This decision aid provides information about two options: 1. Being upright 2 Lying down This decision aid will also answer (...) to get more information? If you have any concerns about yourself or your baby/babies and want to talk to someone, please call: » your family doctor » 13 HEALTH telephone line (13 432 584) » Lifeline counselling service (131 114) » Stillbirth and Neonatal Death Support (SANDS) helpline (1800 228 655) » Pregnancy, Birth & Baby Helpline (1800 882 436) What is this decision aid about? 2 The research and development of this decision aid was conducted by Natasha Hayes, a health researcher at the Queensland

2015 EUnetHTA

197. A decision aid for pregnant woman with a breech baby

A decision aid for pregnant woman with a breech baby A decision aid for women Making choices: options for a pregnant woman with a breech baby This workbook and tape/CD will prepare you for an informed discussion with your doctor or midwife. It will give you information about the two options available to you when having a breech baby. Instructions: 1. Set aside 30-40 minutes 2. Have a pencil ready 3. Place the cassette tape/CD in the player and press play 4. Stay on the page until you are asked (...) to turn to the next page Please Note: Research studies that support the information provided in this workbook are referenced by numbers such as “1”. The complete list of references is at the back of this workbook. Welcome 1 • a breech baby • turning a breech baby using external cephalic version (ECV) • the benefits and risks of ECV • a planned caesarean section if you don’t choose ECV • how to weigh up your own reasons to choose or not to choose an ECV • decisions made by other women This decision aid

2015 SickKids Supportive Care Guidelines

198. A decision aid for women with a mildly abnormal Pap smear

A decision aid for women with a mildly abnormal Pap smear Making Choices TM A Decision Aid for Women with a mildly abnormal Pap smear If you have any questions or concerns about this booklet, please call the IMAP Study Team: 1300 363 803 Screening & Test Evaluation Program School of Public Health Edward Ford Building (A27) University of Sydney NSW 2006 Screening & Test Evaluation Program School of Public Health University of Sydney R159914_SYDU_MC_a5 23/1/04 9:21 AM Page 12 This Decision Aid (...) colposcopy." Br J Obstet Gynaecol 97(9): 859-61. IMAP Study Decision Aid group Kirsten McCaffery Senior Research Fellow, STEP, School of Public Health, University of Sydney Les Irwig Professor, STEP, School of Public Health, University of Sydney Alex Barratt Senior Lecturer, STEP, School of Public Health, University of Sydney Edith Weisberg Research Director, FPA Health, NSW Mary Lewicka Research Assistant, STEP, School of Public Health, University of Sydney This Decision Aid was reviewed by: Natasha

2015 SickKids Supportive Care Guidelines

199. Choosing your model of care: A decision aid for pregnant women choosing their maternity care provider

Choosing your model of care: A decision aid for pregnant women choosing their maternity care provider Choosing your model of care A decision aid for pregnant women choosing their maternity care providerThis decision aid has been written to support women to know what to expect and to have a say in making decisions about their care during pregnancy, labour, birth and after birth. This decision aid provides information about four options: 1. Shared care 2. Public midwifery models of care 3 (...) . Private obstetric care 4. Private midwifery care This decision aid will answer the following questions: » What is maternity care? » What is a model of care? » Who can provide my maternity care? » What are my options? » What happens if I choose shared care? » What happens if I choose midwifery models of care? » What happens if I choose private obstetric care? » What happens if I choose private midwifery care? » Will I always be able to choose? » How might I choose my model of care? » What

2015 EUnetHTA

200. Deciding whether to join the IBIS-II DCIS study: A Decision Aid for Women with DCIS

Deciding whether to join the IBIS-II DCIS study: A Decision Aid for Women with DCIS Deciding whether to join the IBIS-II DCIS study A Decision Aid for Women with DCIS Making Choices© Medical Psychology Research Unit, University of Sydney & Australian New Zealand Breast Cancer Trials Group Making Choices Deciding whether to join the IBIS-II DCIS study A Decision Aid for Post-Menopausal Women with DCIS. Contents Introduction 4 Understanding breast cancer risk 5 Increased risk of breast cancer 5 (...) www.nbcc.org.au The Cancer Council Australia www.cancer.org.au The IBIS-II DCIS Research Protocol, Decision Aid Booklet, and Questionnaires have been reviewed and endorsed by the ANZ BCTG Consumer Advisory Panel.. References • Buzdar AU, Jonat W, Howell A et al. Arimidex: A potent and selective aromatase inhibitor for the treatment of advanced breast cancer. Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 1997; 61:145-149. • Fisher B, Dignam J, Wolmark N et al. Tamoxifen in treatment of intraductal

2015 SickKids Supportive Care Guidelines