Latest & greatest articles for anaesthesia

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on anaesthesia or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on anaesthesia and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Anaesthesia

Clinical Anaesthesia is used to induce a temporary medical state of controlled unconsciousness, inducing a loss of sensation or awareness. There are three main types of Anaesthesia:

  • Local and Regional
  • General
  • Sedation

Anaesthesia is primarily used during surgical procedures to block pain. While unconscious, blood flow and heart rate is monitored.

Research and development in the use of Anaesthesia has helped anesthesiologists in the progression of patient safety before and after surgery and medical procedures. The developments and research of Anaesthesia through the years has massively influences medicine and surgery today.

Case studies and clinical trials help aid researchers in the development of aftercare during postoperative recovery. Research is a vital part in the field of Anaesthesia, it allows anesthesiologists to improve the delivery of patient safety while unconscious.

Learn more on the emerging technology in Anaesthesia and the advancements in Anaesthesia practise by searching Trip.

Top results for anaesthesia

1. Combined spinal-epidural versus spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section. (PubMed)

Combined spinal-epidural versus spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section. Single-shot spinal anaesthesia (SSS) and combined spinal-epidural (CSE) anaesthesia are both commonly used for caesarean section anaesthesia. Spinals offer technical simplicity and rapid onset of nerve blockade which can be associated with hypotension. CSE anaesthesia allows for more gradual onset and also prolongation of the anaesthesia through use of a catheter.To compare the effectiveness and adverse effects of CSE (...) anaesthesia to single-shot spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section.We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth's Trials Register, ClinicalTrials.gov, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), and reference lists of retrieved studies (search date: 8 August 2019).We considered all published randomised controlled trials (RCTs) involving a comparison of CSE anaesthesia with single-shot spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section. We further subgrouped spinal anaesthesia as either

2019 Cochrane

2. Statement on Environmental Sustainability in Anaesthesia and Pain Medicine Practice

Statement on Environmental Sustainability in Anaesthesia and Pain Medicine Practice PS64 2019 Page 1 PS64 2019 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Faculty of Pain Medicine Statement on Environmental Sustainability in Anaesthesia and Pain Medicine Practice 1. PURPOSE The purpose of this statement is: 1.1 to affirm ANZCA’s commitment to minimising the health impact of climate change and promoting environmental sustainability. 1.2 to serve as a resource for clinicians (...) to promote environmentally sustainable practices in their workplace. 1.3 to assist healthcare facilities in embedding sustainable practices in the delivery of safe patient care. 2. SCOPE This document is intended to apply to all clinicians practising anaesthesia, perioperative medicine and pain medicine, and all healthcare facilities in which anaesthesia, perioperative and pain medicine services are provided. 3. BACKGROUND The healthcare sector is highly interconnected with activities that emit pollution

2019 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

3. Guidelines for crises in anaesthesia - Quick Reference Handbook

Guidelines for crises in anaesthesia - Quick Reference Handbook QRH Quick Reference Handbook Guidelines for crises in anaesthesia To ensure you have the most up to date edition, refer to contents page and website. This handbook remains the property of the Department of Anaesthesia This copy belongs in the following location:_________________________ Return immediately when not in use (or if found) DO NOT add or remove documents DO NOT alter the order of documents The guidelines in this handbook (...) and APL valve (Box E) 100 bpm sinus rhythm, treat as hypovolaemia: give i.v fluid bolus. • If heart rate >100 bpm and non-sinus ? 2-7 Tachycardia. ? Depth • Ensure correct depth of anaesthesia AND analgesia (consider risk of awareness). ? Exclude potential surgical causes (Box D) – discuss with surgical team. ? Consider causes in Box E and call for help if problem not resolving quickly. 2-4 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain & Ireland 2018. www.aagbi.org/qrh Subject to Creative Commons

2019 Association of Anaesthetists of GB and Ireland

4. Safe provision of anaesthesia in magnetic resonance units

Safe provision of anaesthesia in magnetic resonance units Guidelines Safe provision of anaesthesia in magnetic resonance units 2019 February 2019Guidelines Guidelinesforthesafeprovisionofanaesthesiainmagnetic resonanceunits2019 GuidelinesfromtheAssociationofAnaesthetistsandtheNeuroAnaesthesiaand CriticalCareSocietyofGreatBritainandIreland S.R.Wilson, 1 S.Shinde, 2 I.Appleby, 3 M.Boscoe, 4 D.Conway, 5 C.Dryden, 6 K.Ferguson, 7 W.Gedroyc, 8 S.M.Kinsella, 9 M.H.Nathanson, 10 J.Thorne, 11 M.White (...) 8ConsultantRadiologist,ImperialCollege,London,UKandRoyalCollegeofRadiologists 9Consultant,DepartmentofAnaesthesia,StMichaelsHospital,Bristol,UKandEditor,Anaesthesia 10Consultant,DepartmentofAnaesthesia,NottinghamUniversityHospital,Nottingham,UKandImmediatePast HonorarySecretary,AssociationofAnaesthetists 11Consultant,DepartmentofNeurosurgery,SalfordRoyalFoundationTrust,Salford,UKandSocietyofBritish NeurologicalSurgeons 12MedicalPhysicist,UniversityCollegeLondon,UK 13Consultant

2019 Association of Anaesthetists of GB and Ireland

5. Concise practice guidance on the prevention and management of accidental awareness during general anaesthesia

Concise practice guidance on the prevention and management of accidental awareness during general anaesthesia Guidelines The ‘NAP5 Handbook’ Concise practice guidance on the prevention and management of accidental awareness during general anaesthesia March 2019 Published by the Association of Anaesthetists and the Royal College of Anaesthetists2 Association of Anaesthetists Association of Anaesthetists 2 The ‘NAP5 Handbook’ Concise practice guidance on the prevention and management (...) of accidental awareness during general anaesthesia Membership of the working party J. J Pandit 1 , T. M Cook 2 , S. Shinde 3 , K. Ferguson 4 , J. Hitchman 5 , W. Jonker 6 , P . M Odor 7 , T. Meek 8 1 Consultant, Nuffield Department of Anaesthesia, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Oxford, UK (Co-Chair, Working Party on behalf of the Royal College of Anaesthetists) 2 Consultant, Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, Royal United Hospital, Bath, UK (on behalf of Royal College

2019 Association of Anaesthetists of GB and Ireland

6. Neurodevelopmental outcome at 5 years of age after general anaesthesia or awake-regional anaesthesia in infancy (GAS): an international, multicentre, randomised, controlled equivalence trial. (PubMed)

Neurodevelopmental outcome at 5 years of age after general anaesthesia or awake-regional anaesthesia in infancy (GAS): an international, multicentre, randomised, controlled equivalence trial. In laboratory animals, exposure to most general anaesthetics leads to neurotoxicity manifested by neuronal cell death and abnormal behaviour and cognition. Some large human cohort studies have shown an association between general anaesthesia at a young age and subsequent neurodevelopmental deficits (...) , but these studies are prone to bias. Others have found no evidence for an association. We aimed to establish whether general anaesthesia in early infancy affects neurodevelopmental outcomes.In this international, assessor-masked, equivalence, randomised, controlled trial conducted at 28 hospitals in Australia, Italy, the USA, the UK, Canada, the Netherlands, and New Zealand, we recruited infants of less than 60 weeks' postmenstrual age who were born at more than 26 weeks' gestation and were undergoing inguinal

2019 Lancet

7. Inhaled anaesthesia with anti-sickness medication in children has the same risk of vomiting as intravenous anaesthesia

Inhaled anaesthesia with anti-sickness medication in children has the same risk of vomiting as intravenous anaesthesia Inhaled anaesthesia with anti-sickness medication in children has the same risk of vomiting as intravenous anaesthesia Discover Portal Discover Portal Inhaled anaesthesia with anti-sickness medication in children has the same risk of vomiting as intravenous anaesthesia Published on 27 February 2018 doi: Post-operative vomiting is common in children. One strategy is to use (...) group versus 32% inhalation anaesthetic plus antiemetic group (risk ratio 0.99, 95% CI 0.77 to 1.27; 4 trials, 558 children). A similar amount of time was spent in the post-anaesthesia unit (mean difference ‑8.93 minutes, 95% CI ‑22.0 to 4.18). No other adverse events were reported in the trials. What does current guidance say on this issue? The Association of Paediatric Anaesthetists of Great Britain & Ireland (2016) suggest intravenous anaesthesia is considered in children at high risk of sickness

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

8. Regional anaesthesia could improve fistula function for kidney dialysis

Regional anaesthesia could improve fistula function for kidney dialysis Regional anaesthesia could improve fistula function for kidney dialysis Discover Portal Discover Portal Regional anaesthesia could improve fistula function for kidney dialysis Published on 25 July 2017 doi: Use of regional anaesthesia when creating a fistula for vascular access may reduce the risk of failure by about 70%. Easy access to blood vessels is important when someone needs kidney dialysis and the commonest (...) procedure is forming of an artificial link between arteries and veins, called a fistula. Unfortunately some newly formed fistulas fail because the blood vessel is not “patent” or open wide enough to work properly. This systematic review found four randomised controlled trials of adults having surgery to make an arteriovenous fistula for kidney dialysis. The trials compared how well the fistulas worked when they had been formed using regional anaesthesia compared with those formed using local anaesthesia

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

9. Epidural anaesthesia helps return of bowel function after abdominal surgery

Epidural anaesthesia helps return of bowel function after abdominal surgery Epidural anaesthesia helps return of bowel function after abdominal surgery Discover Portal Discover Portal Epidural anaesthesia helps return of bowel function after abdominal surgery Published on 27 September 2016 doi: High quality evidence suggests that an epidural anaesthetic (with or without an opioid) promotes the return of gut function after abdominal surgery. This is when compared to an opioid based regimen (...) and may reduce the need for opioids. This updated Cochrane review compared the effects of giving an epidural anaesthetic with giving opioids after abdominal surgery. Opioids could either be injected directly into the bloodstream or given through an epidural. What did this study do? The review pooled the results of 94 randomised controlled trials including 5,846 adults undergoing any form of abdominal surgery under general anaesthesia. Treatment groups received an epidural containing local anaesthetic

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

10. Two types of anaesthesia are safe for hip and knee replacements but one may reduce the time spent in hospital by a few hours

Two types of anaesthesia are safe for hip and knee replacements but one may reduce the time spent in hospital by a few hours Two types of anaesthesia are safe for hip and knee replacements but one may reduce the time spent in hospital by a few hours Discover Portal Discover Portal Two types of anaesthesia are safe for hip and knee replacements but one may reduce the time spent in hospital by a few hours Published on 15 March 2016 doi: Neuraxial anaesthesia, administered around the nerves (...) in the spine, was found to be as safe as general anaesthesia for people undergoing total hip or knee replacements. This review found a similar risk of dying, infection, nerve damage and blood clots in people regardless of the type of anaesthesia. Hospital stay was reduced on average by 0.4 days in the neuraxial anaesthesia group, though the significance to patients or impact on costs was not explored. Using neuraxial anaesthesia took no longer to perform than general anaesthesia. Hip and knee replacements

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

11. The Anaesthesia Team 2018

The Anaesthesia Team 2018 Guidelines The Anaesthesia Team 2018 July 20182 Association of Anaesthetists | The Anaesthesia Team Association of Anaesthetists | The Anaesthesia Team 3 The Anaesthesia Team Membership of the working party Prof Richard Griffiths, Consultant Anaesthetist, Peterborough; Association of Anaesthetists (Chair) Mrs Hannah Abbott, President, College of Operating Department Practitioners Dr Paul Barker, Consultant Anaesthetist, Norwich; Hon Treasurer, Association (...) of Anaesthetists Dr William Harrop-Griffiths, Consultant Anaesthetist, London; Council Member, Royal College of Anaesthetists Dr Gerry Keenan, Consultant Anaesthetist, Edinburgh; Council Member, Association of Anaesthetists Mr Bill Kilvington, Patient Safety Lead and Immediate Past President, College of Operating Department Practitioners Ms Marina Quantick, Association of Physicians’ Assistants Anaesthesia This guideline has been seen and approved by the Board of the Association of Anaesthetists

2019 Association of Anaesthetists of GB and Ireland

12. VivaSight double lumen-tube or conventional double-lumen tube for tracheal intubation in adults requiring general anaesthesia with thoracic surgery--a systematic review and net-work meta analysis

VivaSight double lumen-tube or conventional double-lumen tube for tracheal intubation in adults requiring general anaesthesia with thoracic surgery--a systematic review and net-work meta analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears

2019 PROSPERO

13. Should we routinely use neuromuscular blocking agents in anaesthesia? A systematic review of adverse effects

Should we routinely use neuromuscular blocking agents in anaesthesia? A systematic review of adverse effects Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files

2019 PROSPERO

14. The effect of EEG- guided anaesthesia on postoperative delirium in patients undergoing surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis

The effect of EEG- guided anaesthesia on postoperative delirium in patients undergoing surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record

2019 PROSPERO

15. Influence of xenon anaesthesia on postoperative pulmonary complications: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Influence of xenon anaesthesia on postoperative pulmonary complications: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files

2019 PROSPERO

16. Efficacy of dexmedetomidine as adjuvant for peribulbar anaesthesia: systematic review and meta-analysis

Efficacy of dexmedetomidine as adjuvant for peribulbar anaesthesia: systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files

2019 PROSPERO

17. Local anaesthesia for pain control during outpatient hysteroscopy

Local anaesthesia for pain control during outpatient hysteroscopy Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g

2019 PROSPERO

18. Is a combined intravenous-volatile anaesthesia superior compared to an intravenous or volatile anesthesia alone: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Is a combined intravenous-volatile anaesthesia superior compared to an intravenous or volatile anesthesia alone: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content

2019 PROSPERO

19. What is the optimum mode of anaesthesia for rigid bronchoscopy in children? A systematic review of the literature

What is the optimum mode of anaesthesia for rigid bronchoscopy in children? A systematic review of the literature Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated

2019 PROSPERO

20. Maternal position in the second stage of labour for women with epidural anaesthesia. (PubMed)

Maternal position in the second stage of labour for women with epidural anaesthesia. Epidural analgesia in labour prolongs the second stage and increases instrumental delivery. It has been suggested that a more upright maternal position during all or part of the second stage may counteract these adverse effects. This is an update of a Cochrane Review published in 2017.To assess the effects of different birthing positions (upright or recumbent) during the second stage of labour, on maternal

2018 Cochrane