Latest & greatest articles for anticoagulation

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Top results for anticoagulation

21. Extended Anticoagulation for VTE: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis (Abstract)

Extended Anticoagulation for VTE: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis The efficacy and safety of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) and vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) during extended anticoagulation for a VTE remains largely unknown, especially in terms of potential survival benefit. The goal of this study was to assess the effects of VKAs and DOACs on overall mortality and VTE-related mortality, as well as VTE recurrence and safety.PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were searched from (...) January 1990 through September 2018 for randomized controlled trials evaluating the effect of extended anticoagulants as secondary prevention for VTE compared with placebo. The primary outcome was the specific effects of standard-intensity VKAs and DOACs on overall mortality.Sixteen studies (12,458 patients) were included. DOACs were associated with a reduction in overall (risk ratio [RR], 0.48; 95% CI, 0.27-0.86; P = .01) and VTE-related (RR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.15-0.89; P = .03) mortality, whereas VKAs

2019 EvidenceUpdates

22. Society of Interventional Radiology Consensus Guidelines for the Periprocedural Management of Thrombotic and Bleeding Risk in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Image-Guided Interventions—Part I: Review of Anticoagulation Agents and Clinical Considerations Full Text available with Trip Pro

Society of Interventional Radiology Consensus Guidelines for the Periprocedural Management of Thrombotic and Bleeding Risk in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Image-Guided Interventions—Part I: Review of Anticoagulation Agents and Clinical Considerations Society of Interventional Radiology Consensus Guidelines for the Periprocedural Management of Thrombotic and Bleeding Risk in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Image-Guided Interventions—Part I: Review of Anticoagulation Agents and Clinical (...) Considerations - Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology Email/Username: Password: Remember me Available now: Use your SIR login to access JVIR. Search Terms Search within Search Share this page Access provided by Article in Press Society of Interventional Radiology Consensus Guidelines for the Periprocedural Management of Thrombotic and Bleeding Risk in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Image-Guided Interventions—Part I: Review of Anticoagulation Agents and Clinical Considerations Endorsed

2019 Society of Interventional Radiology

23. Oral anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation with valvular heart disease and bioprosthetic heart valves (Abstract)

Oral anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation with valvular heart disease and bioprosthetic heart valves Current guidelines endorse the use of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, little is known about their safety and efficacy in valvular heart disease (VHD). Similarly, there is a paucity of data regarding NOACs use in patients with a bioprosthetic heart valve (BPHV). We, therefore, performed a network meta-analysis

2019 EvidenceUpdates

24. Oral anticoagulation in patients with chronic kidney disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis (Abstract)

Oral anticoagulation in patients with chronic kidney disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis Data regarding the efficacy and safety of warfarin and non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant (NOAC) among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain scarce.Systematic review and meta-analysis of studies involving patients with CKD treated with oral anticoagulants were conducted to evaluate the following outcomes: ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), combined ischemic (...) and hemorrhagic stroke (strokecombined), stroke or systemic embolism, mortality, and major bleeding events. CKD was defined based on creatinine clearance (CrCl) ranging from mild (CrCl: 60-89 mL/min), moderate (CrCl: 30-59 mL/min), to severe (CrCl: 15-29 mL/min).Fifteen studies (7 comparing NOAC vs warfarin and 8 comparing warfarin vs no anticoagulant) were identified comprising 78,053 patients. Warfarin (vs no anticoagulant) was associated with reduced risk of ischemic stroke (risk ratio [RR] = 0.68; 95

2019 EvidenceUpdates

25. Direct oral anticoagulants in patients undergoing cardioversion: insight from randomized clinical trials. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Direct oral anticoagulants in patients undergoing cardioversion: insight from randomized clinical trials. Anticoagulation, reducing the risk of thromboembolic events in patients undergoing cardioversion, is a cornerstone of peri-cardioversion management in patients with atrial fibrillation. We aimed to analyse published data on the efficacy and safety of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in patients undergoing cardioversion. We performed a systematic review of randomized prospective clinical (...) ). The incidence rate of adverse events during DOAC treatment was found to be very similar to that observed with warfarin anticoagulation. In RCTs DOAC treatment in patients undergoing cardioversion appears to be effective and safe. However, because evidence in this clinical setting is still weak, observational reports could be useful in providing further data about peri-procedural outcomes.

2019 Monaldi archives for chest disease = Archivio Monaldi per le malattie del torace Controlled trial quality: uncertain

26. Incident Atrial Fibrillation, Dementia and the Role of Anticoagulation: A Population-Based Cohort Study (Abstract)

Incident Atrial Fibrillation, Dementia and the Role of Anticoagulation: A Population-Based Cohort Study  Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with dementia. Anticoagulation may modify this relationship, but it is unclear if this is due to stroke reduction alone. Age- and sex-matched individuals from the U.K. Clinical Practice Research Datalink (2008-2016) with and without an incident diagnosis of AF were followed for a new dementia diagnosis. We estimated adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs (...) ) for incident dementia diagnosis in the AF cohort, overall and stratified by anticoagulation status, using the matched non-AF cohorts as reference. We performed a sensitivity analysis excluding individuals with stroke/transient ischaemic attack (TIA) before the observation period. Over 193,082 person-years (mean follow-up 25.7 ± 0.1 months), 347/15,276 AF (2.3%) and 1,085/76,096 non-AF (1.4%) were newly diagnosed with dementia (aHR, 1.31, 95% confidence interval, 1.15-1.49). The AF group had more co

2019 EvidenceUpdates

27. Anticoagulation therapy in heart failure and sinus rhythm: a systematic review and meta-analysis Full Text available with Trip Pro

Anticoagulation therapy in heart failure and sinus rhythm: a systematic review and meta-analysis Heart failure is a prothrombotic state, and it has been hypothesised that thrombosis and embolism cause non-fatal and fatal events in heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). We sought to determine the effect of anticoagulant therapy on clinical outcomes in patients with HFrEF who are in sinus rhythm.We conducted an updated systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the effect (...) of anticoagulation therapy in patients with HFrEF in sinus rhythm. Our analysis compared patients randomised to anticoagulant therapy with those randomised to antiplatelet therapy, placebo or control, and examined the endpoints of all-cause mortality, (re)hospitalisation for worsening heart failure, non-fatal myocardial infarction, non-fatal stroke of any aetiology and major haemorrhage.Five trials were identified that met the prespecified search criteria. Compared with control therapy, anticoagulant treatment

2019 EvidenceUpdates

28. Meta-Analysis of Direct-Acting Oral Anticoagulants Compared With Warfarin in Patients >75 Years of Age (Abstract)

Meta-Analysis of Direct-Acting Oral Anticoagulants Compared With Warfarin in Patients >75 Years of Age Older patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) are at higher risk of thromboembolic events and oral anticoagulant (OAC)-related bleeding complications. This meta-analysis evaluates the efficacy and safety of direct-acting OACs (DOACs) compared with warfarin in older patients with nonvalvular AF. PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Central databases were searched for randomized controlled trials

2019 EvidenceUpdates

29. Canadian Urological Association guideline: Perioperative thromboprophylaxis and management of anticoagulation

Canadian Urological Association guideline: Perioperative thromboprophylaxis and management of anticoagulation CUAJ • April 2019 • Volume 13, Issue 4 © 2019 Canadian Urological Association 105 CUA GUIDELINE Cite as: Can Urol Assoc J 2019;13(4):105-14. http://dx.doi.org/10.5489/cuaj.5828 Published online December 14, 2018 Supplementary material available at cuaj.ca Introduction Surgery exposes patients to a risk of venous thromboembo- lism (VTE) and bleeding. VTE includes deep vein thrombosis (...) - laxis are considered. The first is prophylaxis used for primary prevention VTE for patients undergoing surgery. The second is management of an anticoagulant or antiplatelet agent used for treatment or as a form of secondary prevention dur - ing the perioperative period. The CUA thromboprophylaxis guideline panel feels that it is important for urologists to be engaged in the discussion and management in each of these situations. The panel recognizes that in many clinical contexts, other specialists

2019 Canadian Urological Association

30. Direct oral anticoagulants in patients with venous thromboembolism and thrombophilia: a systematic review and meta-analysis (Abstract)

Direct oral anticoagulants in patients with venous thromboembolism and thrombophilia: a systematic review and meta-analysis Essentials We investigated direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) use in venous thromboembolism and thrombophilia. A comprehensive search identified 10 studies, 8 of which were included in a meta-analysis. DOACs were overall safe and effective in patients with venous thromboembolism and thrombophilia. Efficacy/safety of DOACs was maintained in low-risk antiphospholipid syndrome (...) patient subgroup. SUMMARY: Background Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are increasingly used in acute and long-term treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE). However, their role in management of thrombophilia-associated VTE is controversial. Methods Through a comprehensive search on MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Clinicaltrials.gov, we identified 10 eligible studies, 8 of which reporting data on 1994 thrombophilia patients were included in a random-effects meta-analysis. Eligible studies were phase

2019 EvidenceUpdates

31. Resumption of anticoagulant therapy after anticoagulant-related gastrointestinal bleeding: A systematic review and meta-analysis (Abstract)

Resumption of anticoagulant therapy after anticoagulant-related gastrointestinal bleeding: A systematic review and meta-analysis Oral anticoagulation (OAC) is permanently discontinued in up to 50% of patients following a gastrointestinal (GI) bleed. A previous meta-analysis showed a reduced risk of thromboembolism and death, and a non-statistically significant increased risk of re-bleeding associated with resumption. We conducted an updated meta-analysis to determine the risks of recurrent GI

2019 EvidenceUpdates

32. Responsible, Safe, and Effective Use of Antithrombotics and Anticoagulants in Patients Undergoing Interventional Techniques: American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians (ASIPP) Guidelines (Abstract)

Responsible, Safe, and Effective Use of Antithrombotics and Anticoagulants in Patients Undergoing Interventional Techniques: American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians (ASIPP) Guidelines Interventional pain management involves diagnosis and treatment of chronic pain. This specialty utilizes minimally invasive procedures to target therapeutics to the central nervous system and the spinal column. A subset of patients encountered in interventional pain are medicated using anticoagulant (...) or antithrombotic drugs to mitigate thrombosis risk. Since these drugs target the clotting system, bleeding risk is a consideration accompanying interventional procedures. Importantly, discontinuation of anticoagulant or antithrombotic drugs exposes underlying thrombosis risk, which can lead to significant morbidity and mortality especially in those with coronary artery or cerebrovascular disease. This review summarizes the literature and provides guidelines based on best evidence for patients receiving anti

2019 EvidenceUpdates

33. Improving the Prescription of Oral Anticoagulants in Atrial Fibrillation: A Systematic Review Full Text available with Trip Pro

Improving the Prescription of Oral Anticoagulants in Atrial Fibrillation: A Systematic Review  Oral anticoagulant (OAC) prescription for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients frequently does not follow current guidelines, with underuse in patients at high risk of stroke and substantial overuse in those at low risk. This review aims to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of interventions to improve appropriate OAC prescription in eligible AF patients for stroke prevention

2019 EvidenceUpdates

34. Concomitant Use of Direct Oral Anticoagulants with Antiplatelet Agents and the Risk of Major Bleeding in Patients with Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation Full Text available with Trip Pro

Concomitant Use of Direct Oral Anticoagulants with Antiplatelet Agents and the Risk of Major Bleeding in Patients with Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation Patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation commonly have comorbidities requiring concurrent use of oral anticoagulants and antiplatelets. There are no real-world data on the comparative safety of concomitant antithrombotic treatments in the era of direct oral anticoagulant (DOACs). Thus, we compared the incidence of intracranial hemorrhage (...) (HR 0.46; 95% CI, 0.24-0.91) and other major bleeding (HR 0.68; 95% CI, 0.51-0.91) compared with concomitant VKA-antiplatelet use.Concomitant DOAC-antiplatelet use was associated with a similar risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, and a lower risk of intracranial hemorrhage and other major bleeding than concomitant VKA-antiplatelet use. These findings could inform physician decision-making in patients requiring concomitant treatment with oral anticoagulants and antiplatelets.Copyright © 2018

2019 EvidenceUpdates

35. Antiplatelet Therapy versus Anticoagulation after Surgical Bioprosthetic Aortic Valve Replacement: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis (Abstract)

Antiplatelet Therapy versus Anticoagulation after Surgical Bioprosthetic Aortic Valve Replacement: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis  The optimal antithrombotic therapy after surgical bioprosthetic aortic valve replacement (BAVR) is uncertain. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing antiplatelet therapy and anticoagulation in patients with surgical BAVR. We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE (...) from inception to 3 November 2017 for studies evaluating antiplatelet therapy versus anticoagulation early after surgical BAVR. We performed title and abstract screening, full-text review, risk of bias evaluation and data collection independently and in duplicate. We evaluated overall quality of evidence using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation framework, and pooled data using a random effects model. We identified 2 RCTs (n = 397) and 5 observational studies (n

2019 EvidenceUpdates

36. Effect of anticoagulant treatment on pain in distal deep vein thrombosis: an ancillary analysis from the cactus trial (Abstract)

Effect of anticoagulant treatment on pain in distal deep vein thrombosis: an ancillary analysis from the cactus trial Essentials Management of patients with calf deep vein thrombosis remains controversial. We conducted a post-hoc analysis of a placebo controlled LMWH randomized clinical trial. Pain was assessed using visual analogue scale at inclusion, one and six weeks. There was no difference in pain control between the two arms. SUMMARY: Background The optimal management of distal deep vein (...) thrombosis (DVT) is highly debated. The only available placebo-controlled trial suggested the absence of clear benefit of anticoagulation. Many physicians feel that, beyond preventing thromboembolic complications, anticoagulation with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) has the potential to improve pain control. Objectives To analyze whether LMWHs decrease pain in patients with distal deep vein thrombosis. Patients and methods Two-hundred and fifty-two patients included in a multicenter, placebo

2019 EvidenceUpdates

37. Performing non-neuraxial bedside procedures on patients taking anticoagulants

Performing non-neuraxial bedside procedures on patients taking anticoagulants Blood&Clots Series: Performing non-neuraxial bedside procedures on patients taking anticoagulants - CanadiEM Blood&Clots Series: Performing non-neuraxial bedside procedures on patients taking anticoagulants In , by Calvin Yeh February 19, 2019 All the content from the Blood & Clots series can be found . CanMEDS Roles addressed: Medical expert Case Description You are assessing a patient in the emergency room who (...) is presenting with a unilateral large pleural effusion that is causing hypoxia and shortness of breath. She needs a thoracentesis but her INR is 3.0 due to the Warfarin she takes for atrial fibrillation. How can this procedure be performed safely? What about other common (non-neuraxial) bedside procedures (thoracentesis, NG tube, paracentesis, arthrocentesis) – when is it safe to perform these procedures while on anticoagulants (DOACs, Warfarin)? Main Text Thoracentesis-associated Risk Case series

2019 CandiEM

38. Anticoagulation for patients with moderate to severe renal dysfunction Full Text available with Trip Pro

Anticoagulation for patients with moderate to severe renal dysfunction Blood&Clots Series: Anticoagulation for patients with moderate to severe renal dysfunction - CanadiEM Blood&Clots Series: Anticoagulation for patients with moderate to severe renal dysfunction In , by Menaka Pai February 5, 2019 All the content from the Blood & Clots series can be found . CanMEDS Roles addressed: Medical expert, Manager Case Description You are called to assess an active and energetic 79 year old man who has (...) come to the ER complaining of palpitations for three months. You do an EKG which shows atrial fibrillation. The patient has a history of gout, hemorrhoids, hypertension, and diabetes. His only medications are a thiazide diuretic and insulin. You feel his annual stroke risk is high enough to merit stroke prevention. He’s interested in starting an anticoagulant, but his creatinine is 245 umol/L, and his weight is 25 kg. This gives him a creatinine clearance of 15 mL/minute. Which anticoagulant should

2019 CandiEM

39. Open-Label Randomized Trial Comparing Oral Anticoagulation With and Without Single Antiplatelet Therapy in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation and Stable Coronary Artery Disease Beyond 1 Year After Coronary Stent Implantation Full Text available with Trip Pro

Open-Label Randomized Trial Comparing Oral Anticoagulation With and Without Single Antiplatelet Therapy in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation and Stable Coronary Artery Disease Beyond 1 Year After Coronary Stent Implantation Despite recommendations in the guidelines and consensus documents, there has been no randomized controlled trial evaluating oral anticoagulation (OAC) alone without antiplatelet therapy (APT) in patients with atrial fibrillation and stable coronary artery disease beyond 1 (...) on Thrombosis and Haemostasis classification. Although the trial was designed to enroll 2000 patients during 12 months, enrollment was prematurely terminated after enrolling 696 patients in 38 months.Mean age was 75.0±7.6 years, and 85.2% of patients were men. OAC was warfarin in 75.2% and direct oral anticoagulants in 24.8% of patients. The mean CHADS2 score was 2.5±1.2. During a median follow-up interval of 2.5 years, the primary end point occurred in 54 patients (15.7%) in the OAC-alone group and in 47

2019 EvidenceUpdates

40. Decreased risk of renal impairment in atrial fibrillation patients receiving non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants: A pooled analysis of randomized controlled trials and real-world studies (Abstract)

Decreased risk of renal impairment in atrial fibrillation patients receiving non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants: A pooled analysis of randomized controlled trials and real-world studies Patients with warfarin have a potential risk of warfarin-related nephropathy, which could result in the discontinuation of anticoagulation therapy. The question of whether non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) use is associated with increased risk of renal impairment in atrial

2019 EvidenceUpdates