Latest & greatest articles for anticoagulation

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This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on anticoagulation and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Top results for anticoagulation

141. Prothrombin Complex Concentrates for Perioperative Vitamin K Antagonist and Non-vitamin K Anticoagulant Reversal Full Text available with Trip Pro

Prothrombin Complex Concentrates for Perioperative Vitamin K Antagonist and Non-vitamin K Anticoagulant Reversal Vitamin K antagonist therapy is associated with an increased bleeding risk, and clinicians often reverse anticoagulation in patients who require emergency surgical procedures. Current guidelines for rapid anticoagulation reversal for emergency surgery recommend four-factor prothrombin complex concentrate and vitamin K coadministration. The authors reviewed the current evidence

2018 EvidenceUpdates

142. Effect of Variation in Published Stroke Rates on the Net Clinical Benefit of Anticoagulation for Atrial Fibrillation. (Abstract)

Effect of Variation in Published Stroke Rates on the Net Clinical Benefit of Anticoagulation for Atrial Fibrillation. Stroke rates in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF) who are not receiving anticoagulant therapy vary widely across published studies; the resulting effect on the net clinical benefit of anticoagulation in AF is unknown.To determine the effect of variation in published AF stroke rates on the net clinical benefit of anticoagulation.Markov model decision analysis (...) . Warfarin was the base case, and non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) were modeled in a secondary analysis.Community-dwelling adults.33 434 adults with incident AF.Quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs).Of the 33 434 patients, 27 179 had a CHA2DS2-VASc (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age, diabetes, stroke, and vascular disease) score of 2 or more. The population benefit of warfarin anticoagulation for these patients was least using stroke rates from the ATRIA (AnTicoagulation

2018 Annals of Internal Medicine

143. Meta-Analysis Comparing the Efficacy, Safety, and Cost-Benefit of Direct Acting Oral Anticoagulants Versus Enoxaparin Thromboprophylaxis to Prevent Venous Thromboembolism Among Hospitalized Patients (Abstract)

Meta-Analysis Comparing the Efficacy, Safety, and Cost-Benefit of Direct Acting Oral Anticoagulants Versus Enoxaparin Thromboprophylaxis to Prevent Venous Thromboembolism Among Hospitalized Patients Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a potentially fatal complication of hospitalization. Thromboprophylaxis using subcutaneous low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) can result in local irritation, pain, and ecchymoses, leading to nonadherence. Direct acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are an alternative

2018 EvidenceUpdates

144. "HERDOO2" clinical decision rule to guide duration of anticoagulation in women with unprovoked venous thromboembolism. Can I use any d-Dimer? Full Text available with Trip Pro

"HERDOO2" clinical decision rule to guide duration of anticoagulation in women with unprovoked venous thromboembolism. Can I use any d-Dimer? The "HERDOO2 rule" is a prospectively validated clinical decision rule used to identify low-risk women who can safely discontinue anticoagulants after completing 5-12 months of anticoagulant treatment for unprovoked venous thromboembolism. The VIDAS®d-Dimer (DD) assay, a component of the rule, was used in the derivation and validation of the rule at half (...) , -0.004-0.07)).The "HERDOO2 rule" is the only prospectively validated clinical decision rule that can be used to identify low-risk women with unprovoked venous thrombosis who can safely discontinue anticoagulants. An important implementation issue is whether any commercial DD assay can be used in the HERDOO2 rule, and at what cut-point. Our analysis shows that the HemosIL®, Innovance®, Liatest® and Tina-quant® DD assays should not be used in the "HERDOO2" rule due to poor concordance with the VIDAS®

2018 EvidenceUpdates

145. The efficacy and safety of anticoagulation in cerebral vein thrombosis: A systematic review and meta-analysis (Abstract)

The efficacy and safety of anticoagulation in cerebral vein thrombosis: A systematic review and meta-analysis Anticoagulation with unfractionated heparin (UFH) or low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is the mainstay for the treatment of patients with acute cerebral vein thrombosis (CVT) with or without intracranial hemorrhage (ICH).We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the efficacy and safety of LMWH compared to UFH for the treatment of acute CVT.An electronic search (...) of MEDLINE, Pubmed, CENTRAL and Google Scholar was performed. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) reporting on the efficacy and safety of anticoagulation for acute treatment of CVT were included. Outcomes of interest included mortality, disability, new ICH and pulmonary embolism (PE).Overall, 4 RCTs were included in the meta-analysis. Two trials compared anticoagulation (UFH (N = 1) and LMWH (N = 1)) to placebo. The use of anticoagulation therapy was associated with an odd ratio (OR) for mortality

2018 EvidenceUpdates

146. Anticoagulation

Anticoagulation Top results for anticoagulation - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Liberating the literature ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button. An example search might look like (#1 or #2 (...) ) and (#3 or #4) Loading history... Population: Intervention: Comparison: Outcome: Population: Intervention: Latest & greatest articles for anticoagulation The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

147. Practical Guide to Ablation for Epicardial Ventricular Tachycardia: When to Get Access, How to Deal with Anticoagulation and How to Prevent Complications Full Text available with Trip Pro

Practical Guide to Ablation for Epicardial Ventricular Tachycardia: When to Get Access, How to Deal with Anticoagulation and How to Prevent Complications Epicardial ablation is needed to eliminate ventricular tachycardia (VT) in some patients with nonischaemic cardiomyopathy. The 12-lead electrocardiogram of VT, pre-procedural imaging and endocardial unipolar voltage maps can predict a high likelihood of epicardial substrate and VT. A septal VT substrate may preclude the need for epicardial (...) access and mapping and can be identified with imaging, pacing and voltage mapping. Pericardial access is usually obtained prior to systemic anticoagulation or after reversal of systemic anticoagulation. A unique set of complications can be encountered with epicardial access, mapping and ablation, which include haemopericardium, phrenic nerve injury, damage to major coronary arteries and pericarditis. Anticipating, preventing and, if necessary, managing these complications are paramount for patient

2018 Arrhythmia & electrophysiology review

148. A systematic review and Bayesian network meta-analysis of risk of intracranial hemorrhage with direct oral anticoagulants Full Text available with Trip Pro

A systematic review and Bayesian network meta-analysis of risk of intracranial hemorrhage with direct oral anticoagulants Essentials Risk of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) may differ between direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs). We compared the risk of ICH between DOACs using network meta-analysis. Dabigatran 110 mg and 150 mg were safer than rivaroxaban on Bayesian analysis. Dabigatran 110 mg ranked as the safest DOAC while rivaroxaban ranked last.Background The comparative risk of intracranial (...) hemorrhage (ICH) among direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) remains unclear. Objective To determine the difference in risk of ICH between DOACs Methods Seventeen randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were selected using PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL (Inception, 31 December 2017). Estimates were reported as odds ratio (OR) with 95% credible interval (CR.I) in Bayesian network meta-analysis (NMA), and OR with 95% confidence interval (CI) in traditional meta

2018 EvidenceUpdates

149. Reduced-dose direct oral anticoagulants in the extended treatment of venous thromboembolism: a systematic review and meta-analysis Full Text available with Trip Pro

Reduced-dose direct oral anticoagulants in the extended treatment of venous thromboembolism: a systematic review and meta-analysis Essentials In venous thromboembolism (VTE), benefits of extended treatment are balanced by bleeding risks. This is a meta-analysis of reduced-dose direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in extended treatment. Reduced-dose DOACs are as effective as full anticoagulation with bleeding risks similar to placebo. Reduced-dose DOACs are an attractive option for patients (...) in the extended phase of VTE treatment.Background Extended-duration anticoagulation is beneficial for preventing recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE). Reduced-dose direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) may be preferable if they preserve efficacy and cause less bleeding. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of trials comparing reduced-dose DOACs with full-dose DOACs and aspirin or placebo in the extended phase of VTE treatment. Methods A literature search was conducted by use of the MEDLINE

2018 EvidenceUpdates

150. Antiplatelet and anticoagulant agents for primary prevention of thrombosis in individuals with antiphospholipid antibodies. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Antiplatelet and anticoagulant agents for primary prevention of thrombosis in individuals with antiphospholipid antibodies. Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease characterised by the presence of antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies that have prothrombotic activity. Antiphospholipid antibodies are associated with an increased risk of pregnancy complications (recurrent miscarriage, premature birth, intrauterine growth retardation) and thrombotic events (both arterial and venous (...) ). The most common thrombotic events include brain ischaemia (stroke or transient ischaemic attack) and deep vein thrombosis. To diagnose APS, the presence of aPL antibodies in two measurements and at least one thrombotic event or pregnancy complication are required. It is unclear if people with positive aPL antibodies but without any previous thrombotic events should receive primary antithrombotic prophylaxis.To assess the effects of antiplatelet or anticoagulant agents versus placebo or no intervention

2018 Cochrane

151. Anticoagulation for perioperative thromboprophylaxis in people with cancer. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Anticoagulation for perioperative thromboprophylaxis in people with cancer. The choice of the appropriate perioperative thromboprophylaxis for people with cancer depends on the relative benefits and harms of different anticoagulants.To systematically review the evidence for the relative efficacy and safety of anticoagulants for perioperative thromboprophylaxis in people with cancer.This update of the systematic review was based on the findings of a comprehensive literature search conducted (...) , and thrombocytopenia. We assessed the certainty of evidence for each outcome using the GRADE approach (GRADE Handbook).Of 7670 identified unique citations, we included 20 RCTs with 9771 randomized people with cancer receiving preoperative prophylactic anticoagulation. We identified seven reports for seven new RCTs for this update.The meta-analyses did not conclusively rule out either a beneficial or harmful effect of LMWH compared with UFH for the following outcomes: mortality (risk ratio (RR) 0.82, 95% confidence

2018 Cochrane

152. Risks and benefits of direct oral anticoagulants versus warfarin in a real world setting: cohort study in primary care. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Risks and benefits of direct oral anticoagulants versus warfarin in a real world setting: cohort study in primary care. To investigate the associations between direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) and risks of bleeding, ischaemic stroke, venous thromboembolism, and all cause mortality compared with warfarin.Prospective open cohort study.UK general practices contributing to QResearch or Clinical Practice Research Datalink.132 231 warfarin, 7744 dabigatran, 37 863 rivaroxaban, and 18 223 apixaban (...) users without anticoagulant prescriptions for 12 months before study entry, subgrouped into 103 270 patients with atrial fibrillation and 92 791 without atrial fibrillation between 2011 and 2016.Major bleeding leading to hospital admission or death. Specific sites of bleeding and all cause mortality were also studied.In patients with atrial fibrillation, compared with warfarin, apixaban was associated with a decreased risk of major bleeding (adjusted hazard ratio 0.66, 95% confidence interval 0.54

2018 BMJ

153. Antifibrinolytic therapy for preventing oral bleeding in people on anticoagulants undergoing minor oral surgery or dental extractions. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Antifibrinolytic therapy for preventing oral bleeding in people on anticoagulants undergoing minor oral surgery or dental extractions. Individuals on continuous treatment with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) or direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are at increased risk of bleeding complications during and after oral or dental procedures. Anticoagulant treatment is preferably continued at the same dose, since dose reduction or discontinuation of treatment is associated with an increased risk (...) of thromboembolism. The use of haemostatic measures during or after the procedure (or both) could enable continuation of the oral anticoagulant treatment.We aimed to assess the efficacy of antifibrinolytic agents for preventing bleeding complications in people on oral anticoagulants undergoing minor oral surgery or dental extractions.We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Coagulopathies Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals

2018 Cochrane

154. Interventional Spine and Pain Procedures in Patients on Antiplatelet and Anticoagulant Medications

Interventional Spine and Pain Procedures in Patients on Antiplatelet and Anticoagulant Medications Interventional Spine and Pain Procedures in Patients on Anti... : Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine You may be trying to access this site from a secured browser on the server. Please enable scripts and reload this page. Login No user account? Lippincott Journals Subscribers , use your username or email along with your password to log in. Remember me on this computer Register for a free account (...) Procite Reference Manager Save my selection doi: 10.1097/AAP.0000000000000700 CHRONIC AND INTERVENTIONAL PAIN: SPECIAL ARTICLE Free The American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA) 2012 survey of meeting attendees showed that existing ASRA anticoagulation guidelines for regional anesthesia were insufficient for their needs. Those surveyed agreed that procedure-specific and patient-specific factors required separate guidelines for pain and spine procedures. In response, a guidelines

2018 American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine

155. Anticoagulation and Antiplatelet Strategies After On-X Mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement Full Text available with Trip Pro

Anticoagulation and Antiplatelet Strategies After On-X Mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement The burden oral anticoagulation is a limitation of mechanical valve prostheses.The aim of this study was to test whether patients could be safely managed with dual-antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) (aspirin 325 mg and clopidogrel 75 mg) or lower warfarin after On-X mechanical aortic valve replacement (mAVR).PROACT (Prospective Randomized On-X Anticoagulation Trial) (n = 576) is a multicenter (41 sites (...) . (Randomized On-X Anticoagulation Trial [PROACT]; NCT00291525).Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

2018 EvidenceUpdates

156. Anticoagulation for the long-term treatment of venous thromboembolism in people with cancer. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Anticoagulation for the long-term treatment of venous thromboembolism in people with cancer. Cancer increases the risk of thromboembolic events, especially in people receiving anticoagulation treatments.To compare the efficacy and safety of low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs), direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) and vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) for the long-term treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in people with cancer.We conducted a literature search including a major electronic search (...) compared to VKAs (RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.43 to 0.77; RD 53 fewer per 1000, 95% CI 29 fewer to 72 fewer, moderate-certainty evidence).Direct oral anticoagulants versus vitamin K antagonistsFive studies enrolling 982 participants compared DOACs with VKAs. Meta-analysis of four studies may not rule out a beneficial or harmful effect of DOACs compared to VKAs on mortality (RR 0.93, 95% CI 0.71 to 1.21; RD 12 fewer per 1000, 95% CI 51 fewer to 37 more; low-certainty evidence), recurrent VTE (RR 0.66, 95% CI 0.33

2018 Cochrane

157. Asian patients versus non-Asian patients in the efficacy and safety of direct oral anticoagulants relative to vitamin K antagonist for venous thromboembolism: A systemic review and meta-analysis (Abstract)

Asian patients versus non-Asian patients in the efficacy and safety of direct oral anticoagulants relative to vitamin K antagonist for venous thromboembolism: A systemic review and meta-analysis The standard for treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) has been vitamin K antagonist (VKA), which might be associated with a higher risk of bleeding particularly in Asian patients. Direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) have been shown to be safer alternatives for VTE. It remains

2018 EvidenceUpdates

158. Anticoagulation for people with cancer and central venous catheters. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Anticoagulation for people with cancer and central venous catheters. Central venous catheter (CVC) placement increases the risk of thrombosis in people with cancer. Thrombosis often necessitates the removal of the CVC, resulting in treatment delays and thrombosis-related morbidity and mortality. This is an update of the Cochrane Review published in 2014.To evaluate the efficacy and safety of anticoagulation for thromboprophylaxis in people with cancer with a CVC.We conducted a comprehensive (...) and harms of unfractionated heparin (UFH), low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), vitamin K antagonists (VKA), or fondaparinux or comparing the effects of two of these anticoagulants in people with cancer and a CVC.Using a standardized form, we extracted data and assessed risk of bias. Outcomes included all-cause mortality, symptomatic catheter-related venous thromboembolism (VTE), pulmonary embolism (PE), major bleeding, minor bleeding, catheter-related infection, thrombocytopenia, and health-related

2018 Cochrane

159. Incident Risk Factors and Major Bleeding in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation Treated with Oral Anticoagulants: A Comparison of Baseline, Follow-up and Delta HAS-BLED Scores with an Approach Focused on Modifiable Bleeding Risk Factors (Abstract)

Incident Risk Factors and Major Bleeding in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation Treated with Oral Anticoagulants: A Comparison of Baseline, Follow-up and Delta HAS-BLED Scores with an Approach Focused on Modifiable Bleeding Risk Factors When assessing bleeding risk in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), risk stratification is often based on the baseline risks. We aimed to investigate changes in bleeding risk factors and alterations in the HAS-BLED score in AF patients. We hypothesized

2018 EvidenceUpdates

160. A clinical decision support tool for improving adherence to guidelines on anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation at risk of stroke: A cluster-randomized trial in a Swedish primary care setting (the CDS-AF study) Full Text available with Trip Pro

A clinical decision support tool for improving adherence to guidelines on anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation at risk of stroke: A cluster-randomized trial in a Swedish primary care setting (the CDS-AF study) Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with substantial morbidity, in particular stroke. Despite good evidence for the reduction of stroke risk with anticoagulant therapy, there remains significant undertreatment. The main aim of the current study was to investigate (...) for thromboembolism (according to the CHA2DS2-VASc algorithm) without anticoagulant therapy. The primary endpoint was adherence to guidelines after 1 year. After randomization, there were 22 and 21 primary care clinics in the CDS and control groups, respectively. There were no significant differences in baseline adherence to guidelines regarding anticoagulant therapy between the 2 groups (CDS group 70.3% [5,186/7,370; 95% CI 62.9%-77.7%], control group 70.0% [4,187/6,009; 95% CI 60.4%-79.6%], p = 0.83). After 12

2018 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: predicted high