Latest & greatest articles for anticoagulation

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Top results for anticoagulation

141. Oral anticoagulation in people with cancer who have no therapeutic or prophylactic indication for anticoagulation. (Full text)

Oral anticoagulation in people with cancer who have no therapeutic or prophylactic indication for anticoagulation. Oral anticoagulants may improve the survival of people with cancer through both an antitumor effect and antithrombotic effect, yet increase the risk of bleeding.To evaluate the efficacy and safety of oral anticoagulants in ambulatory people with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, immunotherapy or radiotherapy, but otherwise have no standard therapeutic (...) and will incorporate new evidence rapidly after it is identified. This update of the systematic review is based on the findings of a literature search conducted on 14 December 2017.Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the benefits and harms of vitamin K antagonist (VKA) or direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) in ambulatory people with cancer. These participants are typically undergoing systemic anticancer therapy, possibly including chemotherapy, target therapy, immunotherapy or radiotherapy, but otherwise

2017 Cochrane PubMed

142. Should We Maintain Anticoagulation after Successful Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation? The Need for a Randomized Study (Full text)

Should We Maintain Anticoagulation after Successful Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation? The Need for a Randomized Study Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with a high risk of thromboembolic stroke and oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT) is able to reduce the rate of ischemic events. Nevertheless, the actual benefit of prolonged OAT after successful radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is not clear yet.Scientific investigations were assumed suitable if they assessed (...) the clinical significance of the use of anticoagulation versus no anticoagulation in AF patients undergoing successful RFCA. The odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was used as the study summary measure.At meta-analysis, the rate of total thromboembolic events was not significantly different between the groups (OR 1.83, 95% CI 0.69-4.88; p = 0.221), while a lower incidence of total bleeding events in patients not treated with OAT was found (OR 6.5, 95% CI 1.93-21.86; p = 0.002).This meta

2017 Frontiers in cardiovascular medicine PubMed

143. Secondary prevention of recurrent venous thromboembolism after initial oral anticoagulation therapy in patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism. (Full text)

Secondary prevention of recurrent venous thromboembolism after initial oral anticoagulation therapy in patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism. Currently, little evidence is available on the length and type of anticoagulation used for extended treatment for prevention of recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with unprovoked VTE who have completed initial oral anticoagulation therapy.To compare the efficacy and safety of available oral therapeutic options (aspirin, warfarin (...) , direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs)) for extended thromboprophylaxis in adults with a first unprovoked VTE, to prevent VTE recurrence after completion of an acceptable initial oral anticoagulant treatment period, as defined in individual studies.For this review, the Cochrane Vascular Information Specialist (CIS) searched the Specialised Register (March 2017) as well as the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2017, Issue 2). We also searched trials registries (March 2017

2017 Cochrane PubMed

144. Sociodemographic factors in patients continuing warfarin vs those transitioning to direct oral anticoagulants (Full text)

Sociodemographic factors in patients continuing warfarin vs those transitioning to direct oral anticoagulants Clinical factors and patient preferences are important for selecting oral anticoagulants for venous thromboembolism (VTE) and atrial fibrillation (AF). The relative association of sociodemographic factors with anticoagulant use is unknown. We evaluated a prospective cohort to compare sociodemographic variables in patients who continued on warfarin for AF or VTE to those who transitioned (...) to 1 of the direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs). Adult patients, newly started on warfarin, were enrolled through 6 anticoagulation clinics across Michigan. Of 8468 patients, 53.3% had AF, 45.6% had VTE, and 1.1% had both. Of these, 696 (8.2%) switched from warfarin to a DOAC. There were no significant differences between switchers and nonswitchers for percentage of time with a therapeutic international normalized ratio on warfarin, urban-rural residence status, or health insurance. Switchers were

2017 Blood advances PubMed

145. American Geriatrics Society Beers Criteria and Anticoagulant Use in Older Adults With Renal Impairment (Full text)

American Geriatrics Society Beers Criteria and Anticoagulant Use in Older Adults With Renal Impairment 29340340 2018 11 13 2468-0249 3 1 2018 Jan Kidney international reports Kidney Int Rep American Geriatrics Society Beers Criteria and Anticoagulant Use in Older Adults With Renal Impairment. 222-223 10.1016/j.ekir.2017.11.006 Foody JoAnne J Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc, Titusville, New Jersey, USA. Moore Kenneth Todd KT Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc, Titusville, New Jersey, USA. eng Journal

2017 Kidney international reports PubMed

146. Renal Outcomes in Anticoagulated Patients With Atrial Fibrillation

Renal Outcomes in Anticoagulated Patients With Atrial Fibrillation Lifelong oral anticoagulation, either with warfarin or a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant (NOAC), is indicated for stroke prevention in most patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Emerging evidence suggests that NOACs may be associated with better renal outcomes than warfarin.This study aimed to compare 4 oral anticoagulant agents (apixaban, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and warfarin) for their effects on 4 renal outcomes (...) : ≥30% decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), doubling of the serum creatinine level, acute kidney injury (AKI), and kidney failure.Using a large U.S. administrative database linked to laboratory results, the authors identified 9,769 patients with nonvalvular AF who started taking an oral anticoagulant agent between October 1, 2010 and April 30, 2016. Inverse probability of treatment weighting was used to balance more than 60 baseline characteristics among patients in the 4 drug

2017 EvidenceUpdates

147. Management of Complications in Anticoagulated Patients with Atrial Fibrillation (Full text)

Management of Complications in Anticoagulated Patients with Atrial Fibrillation Oral anticoagulation is mandatory for patients at high risk of thromboembolism, but the risk of bleeding should also be taken into account. Direct oral anticoagulants are now recommended for non-valvular AF as a potential alternative to warfarin. In this article we discuss methods to assess the anticoagulant effect of these agents, specific and general antidotes, and management of complications such as embolic

2017 Arrhythmia & electrophysiology review PubMed

148. Oral anticoagulants for prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation: systematic review, network meta-analysis, and cost effectiveness analysis. (Full text)

Oral anticoagulants for prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation: systematic review, network meta-analysis, and cost effectiveness analysis. Objective To compare the efficacy, safety, and cost effectiveness of direct acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) for patients with atrial fibrillation.Design Systematic review, network meta-analysis, and cost effectiveness analysis. Data sources Medline, PreMedline, Embase, and The Cochrane Library.Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Published

2017 BMJ PubMed

149. Direct oral anticoagulants versus warfarin for preventing stroke and systemic embolic events among atrial fibrillation patients with chronic kidney disease. (Full text)

Direct oral anticoagulants versus warfarin for preventing stroke and systemic embolic events among atrial fibrillation patients with chronic kidney disease. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an independent risk factor for atrial fibrillation (AF), which is more prevalent among CKD patients than the general population. AF causes stroke or systemic embolism, leading to increased mortality. The conventional antithrombotic prophylaxis agent warfarin is often prescribed for the prevention of stroke (...) , but risk of bleeding necessitates regular therapeutic monitoring. Recently developed direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) are expected to be useful as alternatives to warfarin.To assess the efficacy and safety of DOAC including apixaban, dabigatran, edoxaban, and rivaroxaban versus warfarin among AF patients with CKD.We searched the Cochrane Kidney and Transplant Specialised Register (up to 1 August 2017) through contact with the Information Specialist using search terms relevant to this review. Studies

2017 Cochrane PubMed

150. Cyclophosphamide and regional citrate anticoagulation: A sour combination? (Full text)

Cyclophosphamide and regional citrate anticoagulation: A sour combination? We present a case of a woman in her 70 s, on cyclophosphamide for multiple myeloma, who was admitted to critical care with grade III acute kidney injury. Renal replacement therapy with regional citrate anticoagulation was commenced. Shortly thereafter her systemic-ionised calcium levels fell and remained stubbornly low until post-filter calcium return was doubled. Her total-to-ionised calcium ratio gradually increased (...) and so, to avoid further accumulation of citrate, anticoagulation was changed to heparin. Cyclophosphamide, which accumulates in renal failure, is known to interfere with key enzymes involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. We postulate that cyclophosphamide interfered with her citrate metabolism, resulting in persistent systemic chelation of calcium.

2017 Journal of the Intensive Care Society PubMed

151. Comparative safety of direct oral anticoagulants and warfarin in venous thromboembolism: multicentre, population based, observational study. (Full text)

Comparative safety of direct oral anticoagulants and warfarin in venous thromboembolism: multicentre, population based, observational study. Objective To determine the safety of direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) use compared with warfarin use for the treatment of venous thromboembolism.Design Retrospective matched cohort study conducted between 1 January 2009 and 31 March 2016.Setting Community based, using healthcare data from six jurisdictions in Canada and the United States.Participants 59

2017 BMJ PubMed

152. Association Between Use of Non-Vitamin K Oral Anticoagulants With and Without Concurrent Medications and Risk of Major Bleeding in Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation. (Full text)

Association Between Use of Non-Vitamin K Oral Anticoagulants With and Without Concurrent Medications and Risk of Major Bleeding in Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation. Non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are commonly prescribed with other medications that share metabolic pathways that may increase major bleeding risk.To assess the association between use of NOACs with and without concurrent medications and risk of major bleeding in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.Retrospective

2017 JAMA PubMed

153. Antiplatelet and anticoagulant agents for secondary prevention of stroke and other thromboembolic events in people with antiphospholipid syndrome. (Full text)

Antiplatelet and anticoagulant agents for secondary prevention of stroke and other thromboembolic events in people with antiphospholipid syndrome. Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by arterial or venous thrombosis (or both) and/or pregnancy morbidity in association with the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. The prevalence is estimated at 40 to 50 cases per 100,000 people. The most common sites of thrombosis are cerebral arteries and deep veins (...) of the lower limbs. People with a definite APS diagnosis have an increased lifetime risk of recurrent thrombotic events.To assess the effects of antiplatelet or anticoagulant agents, or both, for the secondary prevention of recurrent thrombosis, particularly ischemic stroke, in people with antiphospholipid syndrome.We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (February 2017), CENTRAL (last search February 2017), MEDLINE (from 1948 to February 2017), Embase (from 1980 to February 2017), and several

2017 Cochrane PubMed

154. D-dimer to guide the intensity of anticoagulation in Chinese patients after mechanical heart valve replacement: a randomized controlled trial (Full text)

D-dimer to guide the intensity of anticoagulation in Chinese patients after mechanical heart valve replacement: a randomized controlled trial Essentials Low anticoagulation intensity reduces bleeding but increases thrombosis during warfarin therapy. Elevated D-dimer level is associated with increased thrombosis events. D-dimer can be used to find potential thrombosis in those receiving low intensity therapy. D-dimer-guided therapy may be the optimal strategy for those with mechanical heart (...) valve replacement.Background Controversies remain regarding the optimal anticoagulation intensity for Chinese patients after mechanical heart valve replacement despite guidelines having recommended a standard anticoagulation intensity. Objectives To investigate whether D-dimer could be used to determine the optimal anticoagulation intensity in Chinese patients after mechanical heart valve replacement. Patients/Methods This was a prospective, randomized controlled clinical study. A total of 748

2017 EvidenceUpdates PubMed

155. Therapeutic endoscopy-related GI bleeding and thromboembolic events in patients using warfarin or direct oral anticoagulants: results from a large nationwide database analysis (Full text)

Therapeutic endoscopy-related GI bleeding and thromboembolic events in patients using warfarin or direct oral anticoagulants: results from a large nationwide database analysis To compare the risks of postendoscopy outcomes associated with warfarin with direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), taking into account heparin bridging and various types of endoscopic procedures.Using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database, we identified 16 977 patients who underwent 13 types of high-risk

2017 EvidenceUpdates PubMed

156. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation and valvular heart disease: systematic review and meta-analysis. (PubMed)

Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation and valvular heart disease: systematic review and meta-analysis. The non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) were approved for non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) but this term may be misnomer. Thus, the term non-mechanical and rheumatic mitral valvular (non-MARM) AF was proposed to exclude patients with valvular heart disease (VHD) without contraindications for NOACs. We aimed to review

2017 European heart journal. Cardiovascular pharmacotherapy

157. Effect of Genotype-Guided Warfarin Dosing on Clinical Events and Anticoagulation Control Among Patients Undergoing Hip or Knee Arthroplasty: The GIFT Randomized Clinical Trial. (Full text)

Effect of Genotype-Guided Warfarin Dosing on Clinical Events and Anticoagulation Control Among Patients Undergoing Hip or Knee Arthroplasty: The GIFT Randomized Clinical Trial. Warfarin use accounts for more medication-related emergency department visits among older patients than any other drug. Whether genotype-guided warfarin dosing can prevent these adverse events is unknown.To determine whether genotype-guided dosing improves the safety of warfarin initiation.The randomized clinical Genetic

2017 JAMA PubMed

158. Safety, pharmacokinetics, and reversal of apixaban anticoagulation with andexanet alfa (Full text)

Safety, pharmacokinetics, and reversal of apixaban anticoagulation with andexanet alfa Direct factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors lack a specific reversal agent for emergencies such as major bleeding or urgent surgery. Andexanet alfa, a modified, catalytically inactive, recombinant human FXa derivative, reverses anticoagulant effect by binding and sequestering FXa inhibitors. This original report of safety and dose-finding, phase 1 and 2 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, investigated (...) or respiratory compromise that generally resolved without intervention or dose reduction. There were no thrombotic events or other serious safety issues. In conclusion, andexanet reversed apixaban-mediated effects on pharmacodynamic markers of anticoagulation in healthy volunteers within minutes after administration and for the duration of infusion. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01758432.

2017 Blood advances PubMed

159. Management of anticoagulation in hip fractures: A pragmatic approach (Full text)

Management of anticoagulation in hip fractures: A pragmatic approach Hip fractures are common and increasing with an ageing population. In the United Kingdom, the national guidelines recommend operative intervention within 36 hours of diagnosis. However, long-term anticoagulant treatment is frequently encountered in these patients which can delay surgical intervention. Despite this, there are no set national standards for management of drug-induced coagulopathy pre-operatively in the context (...) , evidence regarding the use of more novel antiplatelet medications (e.g. ticagrelor) and direct oral anticoagulants remains a largely unexplored area in the context of hip fracture surgery. We suggest treatment protocols based on best available evidence and guidance from allied specialties.Hip fracture surgery presents a common management dilemma where semi-urgent surgery is required. In this article, we advocate an evidence-based algorithm as a guide for managing these anticoagulated patients. Cite

2017 EFORT open reviews PubMed

160. Complete Resolution of a Large Bicuspid Aortic Valve Thrombus with Anticoagulation in Primary Antiphospholipid Syndrome (Full text)

Complete Resolution of a Large Bicuspid Aortic Valve Thrombus with Anticoagulation in Primary Antiphospholipid Syndrome Native aortic valve thrombosis in primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APLS) is a rare entity. We describe a 38-year-old man who presented with neurological symptoms and a cardiac murmur. Transthoracic echocardiography detected a large bicuspid aortic valve thrombus. Laboratory evaluation showed the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. Anticoagulation was started, and serial

2017 Frontiers in cardiovascular medicine PubMed