Latest & greatest articles for anticoagulation

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Top results for anticoagulation

161. Patent Foramen Ovale Closure or Anticoagulation vs. Antiplatelets after Stroke. (PubMed)

Patent Foramen Ovale Closure or Anticoagulation vs. Antiplatelets after Stroke. Trials of patent foramen ovale (PFO) closure to prevent recurrent stroke have been inconclusive. We investigated whether patients with cryptogenic stroke and echocardiographic features representing risk of stroke would benefit from PFO closure or anticoagulation, as compared with antiplatelet therapy.In a multicenter, randomized, open-label trial, we assigned, in a 1:1:1 ratio, patients 16 to 60 years of age who had (...) had a recent stroke attributed to PFO, with an associated atrial septal aneurysm or large interatrial shunt, to transcatheter PFO closure plus long-term antiplatelet therapy (PFO closure group), antiplatelet therapy alone (antiplatelet-only group), or oral anticoagulation (anticoagulation group) (randomization group 1). Patients with contraindications to anticoagulants or to PFO closure were randomly assigned to the alternative noncontraindicated treatment or to antiplatelet therapy (randomization

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2017 NEJM

162. Parenteral anticoagulation in ambulatory patients with cancer. (PubMed)

Parenteral anticoagulation in ambulatory patients with cancer. Anticoagulation may improve survival in patients with cancer through a speculated anti-tumour effect, in addition to the antithrombotic effect, although may increase the risk of bleeding.To evaluate the efficacy and safety of parenteral anticoagulants in ambulatory patients with cancer who, typically, are undergoing chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, immunotherapy or radiotherapy, but otherwise have no standard therapeutic (...) in trial registries. As part of the living systematic review approach, we are running searches continually and we will incorporate new evidence rapidly after it is identified. This update of the systematic review is based on the findings of a literature search conducted on 14 August, 2017.Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the benefits and harms of parenteral anticoagulation in ambulatory patients with cancer. Typically, these patients are undergoing chemotherapy, hormonal therapy

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2017 Cochrane

163. Comparison of the CHA2DS2-VASc, CHADS2, HAS-BLED, ORBIT, and ATRIA Risk Scores in Predicting Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants-Associated Bleeding in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation

Comparison of the CHA2DS2-VASc, CHADS2, HAS-BLED, ORBIT, and ATRIA Risk Scores in Predicting Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants-Associated Bleeding in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation The increasing adoption of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) necessitates a reassessment of bleeding risk scores. Because known risk factors for bleeding are largely the same as for stroke, we hypothesize that stroke risk scores could (...) years], drugs/alcohol concomitantly [1 point each] [HAS-BLED], Outcomes Registry for Better Informed Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation [ORBIT], and AnTicoagulation and Risk factors In Atrial fibrillation [ATRIA]) in predicting major and intracranial bleeding. Using a large US commercial insurance database, we identified 39,539 patients with nonvalvular AF who started NOACs between October 1, 2010 and June 30, 2015. The performance of risk scores was compared using C-statistic and net reclassification

2017 EvidenceUpdates

164. A multifaceted intervention to improve treatment with oral anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation (IMPACT-AF): an international, cluster-randomised trial. (PubMed)

A multifaceted intervention to improve treatment with oral anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation (IMPACT-AF): an international, cluster-randomised trial. Oral anticoagulation is underused in patients with atrial fibrillation. We assessed the impact of a multifaceted educational intervention, versus usual care, on oral anticoagulant use in patients with atrial fibrillation.This study was a two-arm, prospective, international, cluster-randomised, controlled trial. Patients were included who had (...) atrial fibrillation and an indication for oral anticoagulation. Clusters were randomised (1:1) to receive a quality improvement educational intervention (intervention group) or usual care (control group). Randomisation was carried out centrally, using the eClinicalOS electronic data capture system. The intervention involved education of providers and patients, with regular monitoring and feedback. The primary outcome was the change in the proportion of patients treated with oral anticoagulants from

2017 Lancet

165. Effectiveness and Safety of Standard-Dose Nonvitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants and Warfarin Among Patients With Atrial Fibrillation With a Single Stroke Risk Factor: A Nationwide Cohort Study (PubMed)

Effectiveness and Safety of Standard-Dose Nonvitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants and Warfarin Among Patients With Atrial Fibrillation With a Single Stroke Risk Factor: A Nationwide Cohort Study The randomized clinical trials comparing nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) vs warfarin largely focused on recruiting high-risk patients with atrial fibrillation with more than 2 stroke risk factors, with only the trials testing dabigatran or apixaban including few patients with 1

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2017 JAMA cardiology

166. Activated protein C light chain provides an extended binding surface for its anticoagulant cofactor, protein S (PubMed)

Activated protein C light chain provides an extended binding surface for its anticoagulant cofactor, protein S Protein S anticoagulant cofactor sensitivity and PAR1 cleavage activity were assayed for 9 recombinant APC mutants.Residues L38, K43, I73, F95, and W115 on one face of the APC light chain define an extended surface containing the protein S binding site.

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2017 Blood advances

167. Influence of renal function on anticoagulation control in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation taking vitamin K antagonists

Influence of renal function on anticoagulation control in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation taking vitamin K antagonists Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been related to poor anticoagulation control and an increased risk of bleeding. This study aims to evaluate the association between impaired renal function (eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 ) and anticoagulation control in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) on vitamin K antagonists (VKA) therapy. We also assessed whether (...) the predictive value of the SAMe-TT2 R2 score prevailed for subgroups both with and without CKD.This is an ancillary analysis of 1381 patients from the PAULA study, which was a cross-sectional, retrospective and nationwide multicenter study.A total of 370 patients had eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 . Anticoagulation control levels progressively worsened across each stage of CKD. Multiple linear regression analysis showed CKD as an independent predictor of time in therapeutic range (TTR). In the subgroup of patients

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2017 EvidenceUpdates

168. Can I Safely Use Anticoagulants in my Patient with a Brain Tumor?

Can I Safely Use Anticoagulants in my Patient with a Brain Tumor? Can I Safely Use Anticoagulants in my Patient with a Brain Tumor? – Clinical Correlations Search Can I Safely Use Anticoagulants in my Patient with a Brain Tumor? August 3, 2017 7 min read By Christopher Sonne, MD Peer Reviewed It is the last admission of your admitting night shift. You are called to assess a pleasant, oriented 65-year-old man with lung cancer and metastases to the bone, liver, and brain. You review his history (...) to bleed. In this case, the patient has metastatic lung adenocarcinoma. Brain metastases from melanoma, thyroid cancer, renal cell carcinoma, and choriocarcinoma are traditionally known to [7]. For your patient, rate of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) from metastatic lung adenocarcinoma appears to be comparatively low [8]. You breathe a little easier. You then consider alternatives to anticoagulation. Pooled data using varied patient populations with malignancy shows a statistically

2017 Clinical Correlations

169. Risk Delayed Traumatic ICH in Patients on Anticoagulation

Risk Delayed Traumatic ICH in Patients on Anticoagulation Emergency Medicine > Journal Club > Archive > May 2017 Toggle navigation May 2017 Risk of Delayed Traumatic ICH in Patients on Anticoagulation Vignette You are working a moonlighting shift at a local level II trauma center when you meet Mr. X, a 68 year old gentleman with a history of atrial fibrillation, for which he takes diltiazem for rate control and warfarin for anticoagulation. He sees his primary care physician on a regular basis (...) the fall. On exam he has a GCS of 15, a super@icial abrasion to his forehead with a small 4 cm hematoma, no cervical spine pain or tenderness, and a normal neurologic examination. His INR today is 3.2. Being an astute reader of the literature, you remember that the studies on the Canadian Head CT rules excluded patients on anticoagulation, and proceed to order a head CT, which is read as normal by the attending radiologist (not a neuroradiologist). After updating the patient’s tetanus booster you

2017 Washington University Emergency Medicine Journal Club

170. The direct oral anticoagulants: can we finally stop using rat poison? (PubMed)

The direct oral anticoagulants: can we finally stop using rat poison? 29296740 2018 01 03 2473-9529 1 14 2017 Jun 13 Blood advances Blood Adv The direct oral anticoagulants: can we finally stop using rat poison? 980 10.1182/bloodadvances.2017002907 Crowther Mark M Section of Hematology, St. Joseph's Hospital, Hamilton, ON, Canada; and McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada. eng Journal Article 2017 06 13 United States Blood Adv 101698425 2473-9529 Conflict-of-interest disclosure: M.C. serves

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2017 Blood advances

171. Practical Implementation of Anticoagulation Strategy for Patients Undergoing Cardioversion of Atrial Fibrillation (PubMed)

Practical Implementation of Anticoagulation Strategy for Patients Undergoing Cardioversion of Atrial Fibrillation Anticoagulation is routinely prescribed to patients with persistent AF before cardioversion to reduce the risk of thromboembolic events. As direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have a rapid onset of action, a consistent anticoagulant effect, if taken correctly, and do not need monitoring or dose adjustments, there is considerable interest in their use for patients with AF undergoing

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2017 Arrhythmia & electrophysiology review

172. Atrial Fibrillation and Anticoagulation in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (PubMed)

Atrial Fibrillation and Anticoagulation in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) represents a common inherited cardiac disorder with well-known complications Including stroke and sudden cardiac death. There is a recognised association between HCM and the development of AF. This review describes the epidemiology of AF within the HCM population and analyses the risk factors for the development of AF. It further discusses the outcomes associated with AF in this population (...) , including the evidence in support of higher stroke risk in patients with HCM with AF compared with the general AF population. Finally, the evidence and recommendations for anticoagulation in this patient group are addressed.

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2017 Arrhythmia & electrophysiology review

173. Gastrointestinal Safety of Direct Oral Anticoagulants: A Large Population-Based Study

Gastrointestinal Safety of Direct Oral Anticoagulants: A Large Population-Based Study Direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) agents increase the risk of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. We investigated which DOAC had the most favorable GI safety profile and compared differences among these drugs in age-related risk of GI bleeding.We conducted a retrospective, propensity-matched study using administrative claims data from the OptumLabs Data Warehouse of privately insured individuals and Medicare

2017 EvidenceUpdates

174. External validation of the VTE-BLEED score for predicting major bleeding in stable anticoagulated patients with venous thromboembolism

External validation of the VTE-BLEED score for predicting major bleeding in stable anticoagulated patients with venous thromboembolism One of the main determinants of establishing the optimal treatment duration of patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) is the risk of major bleeding during long-term anticoagulant therapy. The 6-variable VTE-BLEED score was recently developed to enable estimation of this bleeding risk. This study aimed at externally validating VTE-BLEED. This was a post-hoc (...) study of the randomised, double-blind, double-dummy, Hokusai-VTE study that compared edoxaban versus warfarin for treatment of VTE. VTE-BLEED was calculated in all 8,240 study patients. The numbers of adjudicated major bleeding events during 'stable anticoagulation', i. e. occurring after day 30, in patients with low (total score <2 points) and high risk of bleeding (total score ≥2 points) were compared for the overall study population, patients randomised to edoxaban or warfarin, and for important

2017 EvidenceUpdates

175. Edoxaban (Roteas) - anticoagulant

Edoxaban (Roteas) - anticoagulant 30 Churchill Place ? Canary Wharf ? London E14 5EU ? United Kingdom An agency of the European Union Telephone +44 (0)20 3660 6000 Facsimile +44 (0)20 3660 5520 Send a question via our website www.ema.europa.eu/contact 23 February 2017 EMA/158410/2017 Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) Assessment report Roteas International non-proprietary name: edoxaban Procedure No. EMEA/H/C/004339/0000 Note Assessment report as adopted by the CHMP with all (...) COPD Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease eCTD Electronic Common Technical Document DOAC Direct oral anticoagulants DVT Deep vein thrombosis EC European Commission EEA European Economic Area EMA European Medicines Agency EPAR European Public Assessment Report EU European Union eg exampli gratia (for example) FXa Factor Xa ie id est (that is) INR International normalised ratio LMWH Low molecular weight heparin MA Marketing authorisation MAA Marketing authorisation application MAH Marketing

2017 European Medicines Agency - EPARs

176. Effect of International Normalized Ratio monitoring at home versus the clinic on monitoring adherence in adults taking oral anticoagulant medications: a systematic review protocol. (PubMed)

Effect of International Normalized Ratio monitoring at home versus the clinic on monitoring adherence in adults taking oral anticoagulant medications: a systematic review protocol. The objective of this review is to compare International Normalized Ratio (INR) monitoring adherence in two different settings: the outpatient INR clinic and the patient's home or residence. The review seeks to identify non-adherence trends in both settings to help providers determine which setting is best (...) for patients on warfarin to improve INR monitoring adherence. Improved INR monitoring adherence correlates with maintaining routine INR testing.Specifically, the review question is what is the effect of home point-of-care INR monitoring compared to clinic monitoring on INR monitoring adherence in adults taking oral anticoagulant medications?

2017 JBI database of systematic reviews and implementation reports

177. Educational and behavioural interventions for anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation. (PubMed)

Educational and behavioural interventions for anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation. Current guidelines recommend oral anticoagulation therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) with one or more risk factors for stroke; however, anticoagulation control (time in therapeutic range (TTR)) with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) is dependent on many factors. Educational and behavioural interventions may impact patients' ability to maintain their international normalised ratio (...) (INR) control. This is an updated version of the original review first published in 2013.To evaluate the effects of educational and behavioural interventions for oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT) on TTR in patients with AF.We updated searches from the previous review by searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) in The Cochrane Library (January 2016, Issue 1), MEDLINE Ovid (1949 to February week 1 2016), EMBASE

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2017 Cochrane

178. Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation and Valvular Heart Disease

Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation and Valvular Heart Disease Valvular heart disease (VHD) and atrial fibrillation (AF) often coexist. Phase III trials comparing non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) with warfarin excluded patients with moderate/severe mitral stenosis or mechanical heart valves, but variably included patients with other VHD and valve surgeries.This study aimed to determine relative safety and efficacy of NOACs

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2017 EvidenceUpdates

179. Evaluating the safety and efficacy of regional citrate compared to systemic heparin as anticoagulation for continuous renal replacement therapy in critically ill patients: A service evaluation following a change in practice (PubMed)

Evaluating the safety and efficacy of regional citrate compared to systemic heparin as anticoagulation for continuous renal replacement therapy in critically ill patients: A service evaluation following a change in practice Following the implementation of citrate anticoagulation for continuous renal replacement therapy, we evaluate its first year of use and compare it to the previously used heparin, to assess whether our patients benefit from the recently reported advantages of citrate. We (...) retrospectively analysed 2 years of data to compare the safety and efficacy of citrate versus heparin. The results have shown that 43 patients received continuous renal replacement therapy with heparin, 37 patients with citrate. We found no significant difference in metabolic control of pH, urea and creatinine after 72 h. Filters anticoagulated with citrate had significantly longer median lifespan (33 h vs 17 h; p = 0.001), shorter downtime (0 h vs 5 h; p = 0.015) and less filter sets per patient day (0.37 vs

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2017 Journal of the Intensive Care Society

180. Oral anticoagulants for primary prevention, treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolic disease, and for prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation: systematic review, network meta-analysis and cost-effectiveness analysis

Oral anticoagulants for primary prevention, treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolic disease, and for prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation: systematic review, network meta-analysis and cost-effectiveness analysis Oral anticoagulants for primary prevention, treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolic disease, and for prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation: systematic review, network meta-analysis and cost-effectiveness analysis Journals Library (...) A Davies 1 , Jose A López-López 1 , George N Okoli 1 , Howard HZ Thom 1 , Deborah M Caldwell 1 , Sofia Dias 1 , Diane Eaton 4 , Julian PT Higgins 1 , Will Hollingworth 1 , Chris Salisbury 1 , Jelena Savović 1 , Reecha Sofat 5, 6 , Annya Stephens-Boal 7 , Nicky J Welton 1 , Aroon D Hingorani 5, 6 1 School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK 2 University College London Hospitals, NHS, London, UK 3 Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, NHS, London, UK 4 AntiCoagulation

2017 NIHR HTA programme