Latest & greatest articles for aspirin

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Aspirin

Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) more commonly known as aspirin is a painkiller that has a wide range of uses. It is frequently used to treat fever, mild pain, tooth aches, headaches and muscle aches. Aspirin is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and can be used in the management of conditions such as heart attack, arthritis, blood clots and stroke. Aspirin, has been used for thousands of years, initially extracted from the leaves of willow trees.

Aspirin works in much the same way as other NSAIDs but has additional properties, such as antiplatelet activity which can make it additionally useful. More recently aspirin has been linked with cancer prevention. But the potential benefits of aspirin need to be weighed against the potential side effects, which includes gastrointestinal bleeding and Reye’s syndrome. It should be noted that aspirin should not be used in people who are allergic to drugs such as ibuprofen or a more generalized intolerance to NSAIDs. It should also be used cautiously in asthmatics and/or those with bronchospasm associated with NSAID use.

Research evidence, clinical trials and guidelines on Aspirin

The Trip Database has an extensive collection of articles on aspirin ranging from clinical trials, systematic reviews, clinical guidelines and case reports. These can be found via searching the site.

Top results for aspirin

81. Aspirin for Evidence-Based Preeclampsia Prevention trial: effect of aspirin on length of stay in the neonatal intensive care unit (Full text)

Aspirin for Evidence-Based Preeclampsia Prevention trial: effect of aspirin on length of stay in the neonatal intensive care unit Preeclampsia is a major pregnancy complication with adverse short- and long-term implications for both the mother and baby. Screening for preeclampsia at 11-13 weeks' gestation by a combination of maternal demographic characteristics and medical history with measurements of biomarkers can identify about 75% of women who develop preterm preeclampsia with delivery (...) at <37 weeks' gestation and 90% of those with early preeclampsia at <32 weeks, at a screen-positive rate of 10%. A recent trial (Combined Multimarker Screening and Randomized Patient Treatment with Aspirin for Evidence-Based Preeclampsia Prevention) has reported that in women identified by first-trimester screening as being at high risk for preeclampsia, use of aspirin (150 mg/d from the first to the third trimester), compared to placebo, reduced the incidence of preterm preeclampsia, which

2018 EvidenceUpdates PubMed

82. Clopidogrel and Aspirin in Acute Ischemic Stroke and High-Risk TIA. (PubMed)

Clopidogrel and Aspirin in Acute Ischemic Stroke and High-Risk TIA. Combination antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel and aspirin may reduce the rate of recurrent stroke during the first 3 months after a minor ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). A trial of combination antiplatelet therapy in a Chinese population has shown a reduction in the risk of recurrent stroke. We tested this combination in an international population.In a randomized trial, we assigned patients with minor (...) ischemic stroke or high-risk TIA to receive either clopidogrel at a loading dose of 600 mg on day 1, followed by 75 mg per day, plus aspirin (at a dose of 50 to 325 mg per day) or the same range of doses of aspirin alone. The dose of aspirin in each group was selected by the site investigator. The primary efficacy outcome in a time-to-event analysis was the risk of a composite of major ischemic events, which was defined as ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, or death from an ischemic vascular event

2018 NEJM

83. Meta-analysis on the effect of aspirin use for prevention of preeclampsia on placental abruption and antepartum hemorrhage (Full text)

Meta-analysis on the effect of aspirin use for prevention of preeclampsia on placental abruption and antepartum hemorrhage Impaired placentation in the first 16 weeks of pregnancy is associated with increased risk of subsequent development of preeclampsia, birth of small-for-gestational-age neonates, and placental abruption. Previous studies reported that prophylactic use of aspirin reduces the risk of preeclampsia and small-for-gestational-age neonates with no significant effect on placental (...) abruption. However, meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials that examined the effect of aspirin in relation to gestational age at onset of therapy and dosage of the drug reported that significant reduction in the risk of preeclampsia and small-for-gestational-age neonates is achieved only if the onset of treatment is at ≤16 weeks of gestation and the daily dosage of the drug is ≥100 mg.We aimed to estimate the effect of aspirin on the risk of placental abruption or antepartum hemorrhage

2018 EvidenceUpdates PubMed

84. Effect of Ticagrelor Plus Aspirin, Ticagrelor Alone, or Aspirin Alone on Saphenous Vein Graft Patency 1 Year After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: A Randomized Clinical Trial. (Full text)

Effect of Ticagrelor Plus Aspirin, Ticagrelor Alone, or Aspirin Alone on Saphenous Vein Graft Patency 1 Year After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: A Randomized Clinical Trial. The effect of ticagrelor with or without aspirin on saphenous vein graft patency in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is unknown.To compare the effect of ticagrelor + aspirin or ticagrelor alone vs aspirin alone on saphenous vein graft patency 1 year after CABG.Randomized, multicenter, open-label (...) mg twice daily) + aspirin (100 mg once daily) (n = 168), ticagrelor (90 mg twice daily) (n = 166), or aspirin (100 mg once daily) (n = 166) within 24 hours post-CABG. Neither patients nor treating physicians were blinded to allocation.Primary outcome was saphenous vein graft patency 1 year after CABG (FitzGibbon grade A) adjudicated independently by a committee blinded to allocation. Saphenous vein graft patency was assessed by multislice computed tomographic angiography or coronary

2018 JAMA PubMed

85. Aspirin reduces a woman’s chance of developing pre-eclampsia in pregnancy

Aspirin reduces a woman’s chance of developing pre-eclampsia in pregnancy Aspirin reduces a woman’s chance of developing pre-eclampsia in pregnancy Discover Portal Discover Portal Aspirin reduces a woman’s chance of developing pre-eclampsia in pregnancy Published on 31 October 2017 doi: Giving low dose aspirin to high-risk women reduced their risk of pre-eclampsia before 37 weeks of pregnancy. Preterm pre-eclampsia developed in 1.6% of women given 150mg aspirin daily compared with 4.3% who took (...) a placebo. Pre-eclampsia is a condition which can harm mother and baby. In the mother, it causes high blood pressure and protein in the urine, which can show in pregnancy after 20 weeks. Women with risk factors, such as previous pre-eclampsia, diabetes or high blood pressure, are often prescribed 75mg aspirin from 12 weeks onwards. This study aimed to test double this dose (still classified as a `low dose’) after using a new risk assessment with additional clinical tests to better identify those at high

2018 NIHR Dissemination Centre

86. Daily aspirin reduces pre-eclampsia for ‘at-risk’ women

Daily aspirin reduces pre-eclampsia for ‘at-risk’ women Daily aspirin reduces pre-eclampsia for ‘at-risk’ women Discover Portal Discover Portal Daily aspirin reduces pre-eclampsia for ‘at-risk’ women Published on 24 January 2017 doi: Starting daily low-dose aspirin before 16 weeks of pregnancy in women at risk reduces pre-eclampsia, severe pre-eclampsia and foetal growth restriction. Aspirin started after 16 weeks is less beneficial, giving smaller risk reduction for pre-eclampsia and no effect (...) on other outcomes. Defining who is ‘at risk’ remains challenging. Pre-eclampsia is a rare pregnancy complication, but one that can be dangerous for both mother and baby. Pregnant women are screened for pre-eclampsia risk factors at the antenatal booking appointment. NICE recommend women identified to be at risk are given preventative treatment with 75mg of aspirin from 12 weeks onwards. This large systematic review assessed doses between 50 and 150mg daily and suggests the higher of these low dose

2018 NIHR Dissemination Centre

87. Rivaroxaban plus aspirin may reduce heart attack and strokes in people with peripheral arterial disease, but with an added risk of bleeding

Rivaroxaban plus aspirin may reduce heart attack and strokes in people with peripheral arterial disease, but with an added risk of bleeding Rivaroxaban plus aspirin may reduce heart attack and strokes in people with peripheral arterial disease, but with an added risk of bleeding Discover Portal Discover Portal Rivaroxaban plus aspirin may reduce heart attack and strokes in people with peripheral arterial disease, but with an added risk of bleeding Published on 14 February 2018 doi: People (...) with peripheral arterial disease who took rivaroxaban plus aspirin daily over an average of 21 months reduced their risk of cardiovascular death, heart attack or stroke from seven to five in every 100 people treated compared with those given aspirin alone. The rivaroxaban plus aspirin group also reduced their risk of major limb problems or amputation but increased their risk of bleeding from one to two for every hundred people treated. Peripheral arterial disease is a condition in which the arteries

2018 NIHR Dissemination Centre

88. Early aspirin reduces stroke recurrence following warning symptoms

Early aspirin reduces stroke recurrence following warning symptoms Early aspirin reduces stroke recurrence following warning symptoms Discover Portal Discover Portal Early aspirin reduces stroke recurrence following warning symptoms Published on 7 July 2016 doi: Aspirin taken as soon as possible after a stroke or symptoms of a stroke reduces the risk of further stroke within the next six weeks by about 60%. This is much better than the 13% reduction previously estimated. People with warning (...) strokes, where symptoms resolve within 24 hours, stand to benefit by self-administering aspirin even before a scan can be organised. This analysis of 12 large randomised controlled trials compared outcomes for adults taking aspirin, other drugs that prevent blood clots and no treatment. Aspirin importantly and significantly reduced the risk of early recurrent stroke in people with warning strokes and strokes perceived as less severe. The results support current recommendations that aspirin should

2018 NIHR Dissemination Centre

89. Regular Use of Aspirin or Non-Aspirin Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Is Not Associated With Risk of Incident Pancreatic Cancer in Two Large Cohort Studies

Regular Use of Aspirin or Non-Aspirin Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Is Not Associated With Risk of Incident Pancreatic Cancer in Two Large Cohort Studies Use of aspirin and/or non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduces the risk of several cancers, but it is not clear if use of these drugs is associated with risk of pancreatic cancer.We evaluated aspirin and non-aspirin NSAID use and risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in 141,940 participants from the Health (...) Professionals Follow-up Study and Nurses' Health Study using multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression. We considered several exposure classifications to model differing lag times between NSAID exposure and cancer development. We also conducted a nested case-control study of participants from 3 prospective cohorts using conditional logistic regression to evaluate pre-diagnosis levels of plasma salicylurate, a major metabolite of aspirin, in 396 pancreatic cancer cases and 784 matched

2018 EvidenceUpdates

90. Aspirin or Rivaroxaban for VTE Prophylaxis after Hip or Knee Arthroplasty. (PubMed)

Aspirin or Rivaroxaban for VTE Prophylaxis after Hip or Knee Arthroplasty. Clinical trials and meta-analyses have suggested that aspirin may be effective for the prevention of venous thromboembolism (proximal deep-vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism) after total hip or total knee arthroplasty, but comparisons with direct oral anticoagulants are lacking for prophylaxis beyond hospital discharge.We performed a multicenter, double-blind, randomized, controlled trial involving patients who were (...) undergoing total hip or knee arthroplasty. All the patients received once-daily oral rivaroxaban (10 mg) until postoperative day 5 and then were randomly assigned to continue rivaroxaban or switch to aspirin (81 mg daily) for an additional 9 days after total knee arthroplasty or for 30 days after total hip arthroplasty. Patients were followed for 90 days for symptomatic venous thromboembolism (the primary effectiveness outcome) and bleeding complications, including major or clinically relevant nonmajor

2018 NEJM

91. CRACKCast Episode 149 – Aspirin and Nonsteroidal Agents

CRACKCast Episode 149 – Aspirin and Nonsteroidal Agents CRACKCast Episode 149 - Aspirin and Nonsteroidal Agents - CanadiEM CRACKCast Episode 149 – Aspirin and Nonsteroidal Agents In , by Chris Lipp February 1, 2018 This episode of CRACKCast covers Rosen’s Chapter 149, Aspirin and Nonsteroidal agents. You will become well-versed in the presentation of Salicylism and how to manage it. The episode also touches on NSAID overdose, with rare severe complications. Shownotes: PDF Key concepts (...) ingestion. Rosen’s In Perspective Aspirin, or acetylsalicylic acid, is widely consumed for its analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antiplatelet effects… however salicylate toxicity is not a benign condition and causes a complex set of life-threatening metabolic derangements with significant morbidity and mortality. 20-30 people die every year from ASA overdoses. The very young and very old are at particular risk! It’s not just ASA that we worry about: other potential sources of salicylate toxicity include

2018 CandiEM

92. Effect of low dose aspirin and dipyridamole on primary patency of arteriovenous grafts in hemodialysis patients: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial (Full text)

Effect of low dose aspirin and dipyridamole on primary patency of arteriovenous grafts in hemodialysis patients: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial There is some evidence for the efficacy of antiplatelet therapies in increasing the vascular access patency duration or decreasing the thrombosis of arteriovenous grafts.To determine the effect of low dose aspirin and dipyridamole on primary patency of arteriovenous grafts in hemodialysis patients.This randomized, double-blind (...) , placebo-controlled trial was done at Imam Reza Hospital in Mashhad, Iran from September 10, 2015 to July 05, 2016. Sixty hemodialysis patients, after the placement of a new arteriovenous graft, were divided into three study groups which including; Group 1, who received 80 mg aspirin tablet daily, Group 2 received 80 mg aspirin plus 75 mg dipyridamole daily and Group 3 received placebo daily. Primary unassisted patency was recorded in follow-up until 12 months and the outcomes were analysed using one

2018 Electronic physician PubMed

93. A Systematic Review on the Use of Aspirin in the Prevention of Deep Vein Thrombosis in Major Elective Lower Limb Orthopedic Surgery: An Update from the Past 3 Years. (Full text)

A Systematic Review on the Use of Aspirin in the Prevention of Deep Vein Thrombosis in Major Elective Lower Limb Orthopedic Surgery: An Update from the Past 3 Years. Introduction  Currently there are no consensuses in the national guidance on thromboprophylaxis following major elective lower limb surgery. Emerging clinical evidence suggests that aspirin could be just as effective as anticoagulants with a lower cost. The aim of this study was to provide an update based on literature of the past (...) 3 years for the use of aspirin as thromboprophylaxis after knee and hip arthroplasty. Materials and Methods  MEDLINE/EMBASE search was performed with appropriate terms for original articles from 2014 to 2017. Results  Eight articles were found. Five articles concluded that aspirin was an effective prophylactic. The collation of results on the deep vein thrombosis rate involved 43,012 patients who were prescribed aspirin, of which 283 (0.66%) suffered from symptomatic deep vein thromboses

2018 Surgery journal (New York, N.Y.) PubMed

94. Aspirin versus placebo in pregnancies at high risk for preterm pre-eclampsia. (PubMed)

Aspirin versus placebo in pregnancies at high risk for preterm pre-eclampsia. A recent multicentre placebo-controlled trial by Rolnick et al. has indicated that taking 150 mg aspirin daily in women at high risk of pre-eclampsia reduced the incidence of the disease from 4.3% to 1.5% in comparison with placebo. Although the findings of this study are important, a high proportion of women withdrew their consent and not all safety outcomes have been reported. This journal watch article discusses

2018 Obstetric medicine

95. Comparison of 1-Year Outcomes of Triple (Aspirin + Clopidogrel + Cilostazol) Versus Dual Antiplatelet Therapy (Aspirin + Clopidogrel + Placebo) After Implantation of Second-Generation Drug-Eluting Stents into One or More Coronary Arteries: from the DECREA

Comparison of 1-Year Outcomes of Triple (Aspirin + Clopidogrel + Cilostazol) Versus Dual Antiplatelet Therapy (Aspirin + Clopidogrel + Placebo) After Implantation of Second-Generation Drug-Eluting Stents into One or More Coronary Arteries: from the DECREA This study sought to evaluate the impact of triple antiplatelet therapy on clinical outcomes in patients treated with second-generation drug-eluting stents (DES) for coronary artery disease. There are limited data regarding the impact (...) of triple antiplatelet therapy in patients who underwent implantation of second-generation DES. We planned to randomly assign 2,110 patients treated with second-generation DES to triple (aspirin, clopidogrel, and cilostazol) and dual (aspirin, clopidogrel, and placebo) antiplatelet therapy groups. The primary end point was a composite of death, myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, or target vessel revascularization (TVR) at 1 year since randomization. The study was stopped early owing to slow

2018 EvidenceUpdates

96. Aspirin for Evidence-Based Preeclampsia Prevention trial: effect of aspirin in prevention of preterm preeclampsia in subgroups of women according to their characteristics and medical and obstetrical history (Full text)

Aspirin for Evidence-Based Preeclampsia Prevention trial: effect of aspirin in prevention of preterm preeclampsia in subgroups of women according to their characteristics and medical and obstetrical history The Combined Multimarker Screening and Randomized Patient Treatment with Aspirin for Evidence-Based Preeclampsia Prevention trial demonstrated that in women who were at high risk for preterm preeclampsia with delivery at <37 weeks' gestation identified by screening by means of an algorithm (...) that combines maternal factors and biomarkers at 11-13 weeks' gestation, aspirin administration from 11 to 14 until 36 weeks' gestation was associated with a significant reduction in the incidence of preterm preeclampsia (odds ratio 0.38; 95% confidence interval, 0.20 to 0.74; P=0.004).We sought to examine whether there are differences in the effect of aspirin on the incidence of preterm preeclampsia in the Aspirin for Evidence-Based Preeclampsia Prevention trial in subgroups defined according to maternal

2018 EvidenceUpdates PubMed

97. Vonoprazan prevents low-dose aspirin-associated ulcer recurrence: randomised phase 3 study (Full text)

Vonoprazan prevents low-dose aspirin-associated ulcer recurrence: randomised phase 3 study Compare efficacy and safety of vonoprazan and lansoprazole for secondary prevention of low-dose aspirin (LDA)-associated peptic ulcers in a 24-week study and long-term extension therapy in separate study.Double-blind, randomised, non-inferiority study; single-blind extension study at 104 Japanese sites, including 621 patients (439 in extension) with a history of peptic ulcers who required long-term LDA

2018 EvidenceUpdates PubMed

98. Maternal and child health: Associations between the timing and dosing of aspirin prophylaxis and term and preterm pre-eclampsia

Maternal and child health: Associations between the timing and dosing of aspirin prophylaxis and term and preterm pre-eclampsia Associations between the timing and dosing of aspirin prophylaxis and term and preterm pre-eclampsia | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username (...) and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Associations between the timing and dosing of aspirin prophylaxis and term and preterm pre-eclampsia Article Text Commentary Maternal and child health Associations

2018 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

99. Primary care: Rivaroxaban plus aspirin, compared with aspirin alone, reduced cardiovascular events in patients with stable peripheral or carotid artery disease, but increased the risk of major bleeding

Primary care: Rivaroxaban plus aspirin, compared with aspirin alone, reduced cardiovascular events in patients with stable peripheral or carotid artery disease, but increased the risk of major bleeding Rivaroxaban plus aspirin, compared with aspirin alone, reduced cardiovascular events in patients with stable peripheral or carotid artery disease, but increased the risk of major bleeding | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising (...) Rivaroxaban plus aspirin, compared with aspirin alone, reduced cardiovascular events in patients with stable peripheral or carotid artery disease, but increased the risk of major bleeding Article Text Commentary Primary care Rivaroxaban plus aspirin, compared with aspirin alone, reduced cardiovascular events in patients with stable peripheral or carotid artery disease, but increased the risk of major bleeding Jonathan Mant Statistics from Altmetric.com Commentary on: Anand SS, Bosch J, Eikelboom JW, et al

2018 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

100. Antiplatelet therapy with aspirin, clopidogrel, and dipyridamole versus clopidogrel alone or aspirin and dipyridamole in patients with acute cerebral ischaemia (TARDIS): a randomised, open-label, phase 3 superiority trial. (Full text)

Antiplatelet therapy with aspirin, clopidogrel, and dipyridamole versus clopidogrel alone or aspirin and dipyridamole in patients with acute cerebral ischaemia (TARDIS): a randomised, open-label, phase 3 superiority trial. Intensive antiplatelet therapy with three agents might be more effective than guideline treatment for preventing recurrent events in patients with acute cerebral ischaemia. We aimed to compare the safety and efficacy of intensive antiplatelet therapy (combined aspirin (...) , clopidogrel, and dipyridamole) with that of guideline-based antiplatelet therapy.We did an international, prospective, randomised, open-label, blinded-endpoint trial in adult participants with ischaemic stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) within 48 h of onset. Participants were assigned in a 1:1 ratio using computer randomisation to receive loading doses and then 30 days of intensive antiplatelet therapy (combined aspirin 75 mg, clopidogrel 75 mg, and dipyridamole 200 mg twice daily) or guideline

2017 Lancet PubMed