Latest & greatest articles for aspirin

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Aspirin

Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) more commonly known as aspirin is a painkiller that has a wide range of uses. It is frequently used to treat fever, mild pain, tooth aches, headaches and muscle aches. Aspirin is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and can be used in the management of conditions such as heart attack, arthritis, blood clots and stroke. Aspirin, has been used for thousands of years, initially extracted from the leaves of willow trees.

Aspirin works in much the same way as other NSAIDs but has additional properties, such as antiplatelet activity which can make it additionally useful. More recently aspirin has been linked with cancer prevention. But the potential benefits of aspirin need to be weighed against the potential side effects, which includes gastrointestinal bleeding and Reye’s syndrome. It should be noted that aspirin should not be used in people who are allergic to drugs such as ibuprofen or a more generalized intolerance to NSAIDs. It should also be used cautiously in asthmatics and/or those with bronchospasm associated with NSAID use.

Research evidence, clinical trials and guidelines on Aspirin

The Trip Database has an extensive collection of articles on aspirin ranging from clinical trials, systematic reviews, clinical guidelines and case reports. These can be found via searching the site.

Top results for aspirin

121. Enoxaparin and Aspirin Compared With Aspirin Alone to Prevent Placenta-Mediated Pregnancy Complications: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Enoxaparin and Aspirin Compared With Aspirin Alone to Prevent Placenta-Mediated Pregnancy Complications: A Randomized Controlled Trial To evaluate whether daily enoxaparin, added to low-dose aspirin, started before 14 weeks of gestation reduces placenta-mediated complications in pregnant women with previous severe preeclampsia diagnosed before 34 weeks of gestation.In this open-label multicenter randomized trial, we enrolled consenting pregnant women with previous severe preeclampsia diagnosed (...) before 34 weeks of gestation, gestational age at randomization of 7-13 weeks, singleton pregnancy, and no plan for anticoagulation. Eligible patients were randomly assigned to a one-to-one ratio to receive daily either 4,000 international units enoxaparin plus 100 mg aspirin or 100 mg aspirin alone. Randomization was done by a web-based randomization system. The primary composite outcome comprised maternal death, perinatal death, preeclampsia, small for gestational age (less than the 10th percentile

2016 EvidenceUpdates

122. Aspirin and levofloxacin for the prevention of the occurrence of prostate cancer or transformation to castration-resistant prostate cancer: a two-part, open-label, randomised, controlled study. (PubMed)

Aspirin and levofloxacin for the prevention of the occurrence of prostate cancer or transformation to castration-resistant prostate cancer: a two-part, open-label, randomised, controlled study.

2016 Lancet

123. Systematic review of aspirin for thromboprophylaxis in modern elective total hip and knee arthroplasty (PubMed)

Systematic review of aspirin for thromboprophylaxis in modern elective total hip and knee arthroplasty There is uncertainty regarding the optimal means of thromboprophylaxis following total hip and knee arthroplasty (THA, TKA). This systematic review presents the evidence for acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) as a thromboprophylactic agent in THA and TKA and compares it with other chemoprophylactic agents.A search of literature published between 2004 and 2014 was performed in accordance (...) with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. A total of 13 studies were eligible for inclusion.Evidence from one good quality randomised controlled trial (RCT) showed no difference in rates of venous thrombo-embolism (VTE) in patients given aspirin or low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) following TKA. There was insufficient evidence from trials with moderate to severe risk of bias being present to suggest aspirin is more or less effective than LMWH, warfarin

2016 EvidenceUpdates

124. Recurrent Ischemic Lesions After Acute Atherothrombotic Stroke: Clopidogrel Plus Aspirin Versus Aspirin Alone (PubMed)

Recurrent Ischemic Lesions After Acute Atherothrombotic Stroke: Clopidogrel Plus Aspirin Versus Aspirin Alone In patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by large artery atherosclerosis, clopidogrel plus aspirin versus aspirin alone might be more effective to prevent recurrent cerebral ischemia. However, there is no clear evidence.In this multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomized 358 patients with acute ischemic stroke of presumed large artery atherosclerosis origin (...) within 48 hours of onset to clopidogrel (75 mg/d without loading dose) plus aspirin (300-mg loading followed by 100 mg/d) or to aspirin alone (300-mg loading followed by 100 mg/d) for 30 days. The primary outcome was new symptomatic or asymptomatic ischemic lesion on magnetic resonance imaging within 30 days. Secondary outcomes were 30-day functional disability, clinical stroke recurrence, and composite of major vascular events. Safety outcome was any bleeding.Of 358 patients enrolled, 334 (167

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2016 EvidenceUpdates

125. Prevention of Stroke with Ticagrelor in Patients with Prior Myocardial Infarction: Insights from PEGASUS-TIMI 54 (Prevention of Cardiovascular Events in Patients With Prior Heart Attack Using Ticagrelor Compared to Placebo on a Background of Aspirin-Throm (PubMed)

Prevention of Stroke with Ticagrelor in Patients with Prior Myocardial Infarction: Insights from PEGASUS-TIMI 54 (Prevention of Cardiovascular Events in Patients With Prior Heart Attack Using Ticagrelor Compared to Placebo on a Background of Aspirin-Throm In the PEGASUS-TIMI 54 trial (Prevention of Cardiovascular Events in Patients With Prior Heart Attack Using Ticagrelor Compared to Placebo on a Background of Aspirin-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction 54), ticagrelor reduced the risk (...) of major adverse cardiovascular events when added to low-dose aspirin in stable patients with prior myocardial infarction, resulting in the approval of ticagrelor 60 mg twice daily for long-term secondary prevention. We investigated the incidence of stroke, outcomes after stroke, and the efficacy of ticagrelor focusing on the approved 60 mg twice daily dose for reducing stroke in this population.Patients were followed for a median of 33 months. Stroke events were adjudicated by a central committee

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2016 EvidenceUpdates

126. Aspirin before Coronary Artery Surgery. (PubMed)

Aspirin before Coronary Artery Surgery. 27406359 2016 07 14 2018 12 02 1533-4406 375 1 2016 07 07 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Aspirin before Coronary Artery Surgery. 91-2 10.1056/NEJMc1603852 Myles Paul S PS Smith Julian A JA Painter Thomas T eng Letter Comment United States N Engl J Med 0255562 0028-4793 0 Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors R16CO5Y76E Aspirin AIM IM N Engl J Med. 2016 Feb 25;374(8):728-37 26933848 N Engl J Med. 2016 Jul 7;375(1):90-1 27406360 N Engl J Med (...) . 2016 Jul 7;375(1):91 27406361 Aspirin administration & dosage Coronary Artery Bypass Female Humans Male Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors administration & dosage Postoperative Complications mortality Postoperative Hemorrhage chemically induced Preoperative Care Thrombosis prevention & control 2016 7 14 6 0 2016 7 15 6 0 2016 7 15 6 1 ppublish 27406359 10.1056/NEJMc1603852 10.1056/NEJMc1603852#SA3

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2016 NEJM

127. Aspirin before Coronary Artery Surgery. (PubMed)

Aspirin before Coronary Artery Surgery. 27406360 2016 07 14 2018 12 02 1533-4406 375 1 2016 07 07 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Aspirin before Coronary Artery Surgery. 90-1 10.1056/NEJMc1603852 Alkhodair Abdullah A University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada alkhodair@alumni.ubc.ca. Cairns John J University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada alkhodair@alumni.ubc.ca. eng Letter Comment United States N Engl J Med 0255562 0028-4793 0 Platelet Aggregation (...) Inhibitors R16CO5Y76E Aspirin AIM IM N Engl J Med. 2016 Feb 25;374(8):728-37 26933848 N Engl J Med. 2016 Jul 7;375(1):91-2 27406359 Aspirin administration & dosage Coronary Artery Bypass Female Humans Male Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors administration & dosage Postoperative Complications mortality Postoperative Hemorrhage chemically induced Preoperative Care Thrombosis prevention & control 2016 7 14 6 0 2016 7 15 6 0 2016 7 15 6 1 ppublish 27406360 10.1056/NEJMc1603852 10.1056/NEJMc1603852#SA1

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2016 NEJM

128. Aspirin before Coronary Artery Surgery. (PubMed)

Aspirin before Coronary Artery Surgery. 27406361 2016 07 14 2018 12 02 1533-4406 375 1 2016 07 07 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Aspirin before Coronary Artery Surgery. 91 10.1056/NEJMc1603852 Li Wilson W L WW Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands wilson.li@radboudumc.nl. Wollersheim Laurens W LW Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands wilson.li@radboudumc.nl. Morshuis Wim J WJ Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen (...) , the Netherlands wilson.li@radboudumc.nl. eng Letter Comment United States N Engl J Med 0255562 0028-4793 0 Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors R16CO5Y76E Aspirin AIM IM N Engl J Med. 2016 Feb 25;374(8):728-37 26933848 N Engl J Med. 2016 Jul 7;375(1):91-2 27406359 Aspirin administration & dosage Coronary Artery Bypass Female Humans Male Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors administration & dosage Postoperative Complications mortality Postoperative Hemorrhage chemically induced Preoperative Care Thrombosis prevention

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2016 NEJM

129. Effect of Aspirin on Development of ARDS in At-Risk Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department: The LIPS-A Randomized Clinical Trial. (PubMed)

Effect of Aspirin on Development of ARDS in At-Risk Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department: The LIPS-A Randomized Clinical Trial. Management of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains largely supportive. Whether early intervention can prevent development of ARDS remains unclear.To evaluate the efficacy and safety of early aspirin administration for the prevention of ARDS.A multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial conducted at 16 US academic (...) hospitals. Between January 2, 2012, and November 17, 2014, 7673 patients at risk for ARDS (Lung Injury Prediction Score ≥4) in the emergency department were screened and 400 were randomized. Ten patients were excluded, leaving 390 in the final modified intention-to-treat analysis cohort.Administration of aspirin, 325-mg loading dose followed by 81 mg/d (n = 195) or placebo (n = 195) within 24 hours of emergency department presentation and continued to hospital day 7, discharge, or death.The primary

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2016 JAMA

130. Ticagrelor versus Aspirin in Acute Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack. (PubMed)

Ticagrelor versus Aspirin in Acute Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack. Ticagrelor may be a more effective antiplatelet therapy than aspirin for the prevention of recurrent stroke and cardiovascular events in patients with acute cerebral ischemia.We conducted an international double-blind, controlled trial in 674 centers in 33 countries, in which 13,199 patients with a nonsevere ischemic stroke or high-risk transient ischemic attack who had not received intravenous or intraarterial thrombolysis (...) and were not considered to have had a cardioembolic stroke were randomly assigned within 24 hours after symptom onset, in a 1:1 ratio, to receive either ticagrelor (180 mg loading dose on day 1 followed by 90 mg twice daily for days 2 through 90) or aspirin (300 mg on day 1 followed by 100 mg daily for days 2 through 90). The primary end point was the time to the occurrence of stroke, myocardial infarction, or death within 90 days.During the 90 days of treatment, a primary end-point event occurred

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2016 NEJM

131. Complications and Safety of Preconception Low-Dose Aspirin Among Women With Prior Pregnancy Losses (PubMed)

Complications and Safety of Preconception Low-Dose Aspirin Among Women With Prior Pregnancy Losses To evaluate complications and safety of preconception low-dose aspirin in 1,228 U.S. women (2007-2011).Evaluation of the safety of low-dose aspirin in the participants and their fetuses was a planned secondary analysis of the Effects of Aspirin in Gestation and Reproduction trial, a multicenter, block-randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial investigating the effect of low-dose aspirin (...) on the incidence of live birth. Women aged 18-40 years with a history of one to two pregnancy losses trying to conceive were randomized to daily low-dose aspirin (81 mg, n=615) or placebo (n=613) and were followed for up to six menstrual cycles or through gestation if they became pregnant. Emergency care visits and possible aspirin-related symptoms were assessed at each study follow-up using standardized safety interviews. In addition, complications for both the participant and her fetus or neonate were

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2016 EvidenceUpdates

132. Aspirin resistance in coronary heart disease: Current understandings and strategies (PubMed)

Aspirin resistance in coronary heart disease: Current understandings and strategies 28191510 2019 01 28 2450-131X 4 1 2016 Apr 01 Journal of translational internal medicine J Transl Int Med Aspirin resistance in coronary heart disease: Current understandings and strategies. 7-10 10.1515/jtim-2016-0002 Han Ya-Ling YL Department of Cardiology, General Hospital of Shenyang Military Command, Shenyang 110016, Liaoning Province, China. eng Journal Article 2016 04 14 Poland J Transl Int Med 101673826

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2016 Journal of translational internal medicine

133. Aspirin for the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Colorectal Cancer: A Decision Analysis for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. (PubMed)

Aspirin for the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Colorectal Cancer: A Decision Analysis for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Evidence indicates that aspirin is effective for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and colorectal cancer (CRC) but also increases the risk for gastrointestinal (GI) and cerebral hemorrhages.To assess the net balance of benefits and harms from routine aspirin use across clinically relevant age, sex, and CVD risk groups.Decision (...) analysis using a microsimulation model.3 systematic evidence reviews.Men and women aged 40 to 79 years with a 10-year CVD risk of 20% or less, and no history of CVD and without elevated risk for GI or cerebral hemorrhages that would contraindicate aspirin use.Lifetime, 20 years, and 10 years.Clinical.Low-dose aspirin (≤100 mg/d).Primary outcomes are length and quality of life measured in net life-years and quality-adjusted life-years. Benefits include reduced nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal

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2016 Annals of Internal Medicine

134. Aspirin Use for the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Colorectal Cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. (PubMed)

Aspirin Use for the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Colorectal Cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. Update of the 2009 USPSTF recommendation on aspirin use to prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and the 2007 recommendation on aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use to prevent colorectal cancer (CRC).The USPSTF reviewed 5 additional studies of aspirin for the primary prevention of CVD and several additional analyses of CRC (...) follow-up data. The USPSTF also relied on commissioned systematic reviews of all-cause mortality and total cancer incidence and mortality and a comprehensive review of harms. The USPSTF then used a microsimulation model to systematically estimate the balance of benefits and harms.This recommendation applies to adults aged 40 years or older without known CVD and without increased bleeding risk.The USPSTF recommends initiating low-dose aspirin use for the primary prevention of CVD and CRC in adults

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2016 Annals of Internal Medicine

135. Bleeding Risks With Aspirin Use for Primary Prevention in Adults: A Systematic Review for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. (PubMed)

Bleeding Risks With Aspirin Use for Primary Prevention in Adults: A Systematic Review for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. The balance between potential aspirin-related risks and benefits is critical in primary prevention.To evaluate the risk for serious bleeding with regular aspirin use in cardiovascular disease (CVD) primary prevention.PubMed, MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (2010 through 6 January 2015), and relevant references from other reviews.Randomized (...) , controlled trials; cohort studies; and meta-analyses comparing aspirin with placebo or no treatment to prevent CVD or cancer in adults.One investigator abstracted data, another checked for accuracy, and 2 assessed study quality.In CVD primary prevention studies, very-low-dose aspirin use (≤100 mg daily or every other day) increased major gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding risk by 58% (odds ratio [OR], 1.58 [95% CI, 1.29 to 1.95]) and hemorrhagic stroke risk by 27% (OR, 1.27 [CI, 0.96 to 1.68]). Projected

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2016 Annals of Internal Medicine

136. Aspirin as DVT prophylaxis for high risk long-haul travellers

Aspirin as DVT prophylaxis for high risk long-haul travellers Aspirin as DVT prophylaxis for high risk long-haul travellers – Morsels of Evidence \t\t\t\r\n\t\t\t \t\t\t\r\n\t\t\t Like this: Like Loading... ","author":{"@type":"Person","name":"Michael Tam"},"image":["https:\/\/evidencebasedmedicine.com.au\/wp-content\/uploads\/2016\/02\/MO_19-February_22-219x300.png"]} Toggle search form Toggle navigation Evidence-based medicine for general practitioners Feb 19 2016 Aspirin as DVT prophylaxis (...) for high risk long-haul travellers By in , Journal reference: Cesarone MR, Belcaro G, Nicolaides AN, et al. Venous thrombosis from air travel: the LONFLIT3 study–prevention with aspirin vs low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) in high-risk subjects: a randomized trial. Angiology 2002 Jan-Feb;53(1):1-6. Link: Published: Jan 2002 Evidence cookie says… It is unclear whether aspirin is effective as DVT prophylaxis for high risk long-haul travellers. the single, poorly described study suggests that it may

2016 Morsels of Evidence

137. Oral aspirin for treating venous leg ulcers. (PubMed)

Oral aspirin for treating venous leg ulcers. Venous leg ulcers (VLUs) or varicose ulcers are the final stage of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI), and are the most common type of leg ulcer. The development of VLUs on ankles and lower legs can occur spontaneously or after minor trauma. The ulcers are often painful and exudative, healing is often protracted and recurrence is common. This cycle of healing and recurrence has a considerable impact on the health and quality of life of individuals (...) of compression. Non-adherence may be the principal cause of these poor results, but presence of inflammation in people with CVI may be another factor, so a treatment that suppresses inflammation (healing ulcers more quickly) and reduces the frequency of ulcer recurrence (thereby prolonging time between recurrent episodes) would be an invaluable intervention to complement compression treatments. Oral aspirin may have a significant impact on VLU clinical practice worldwide. Evidence for the effectiveness

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2016 Cochrane

138. Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease - New Prime Suspects. (PubMed)

Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease - New Prime Suspects. 26840139 2016 02 12 2016 02 04 1533-4406 374 5 2016 Feb 04 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease--New Prime Suspects. 484-8 10.1056/NEJMcibr1514013 Laidlaw Tanya M TM Boyce Joshua A JA eng Journal Article United States N Engl J Med 0255562 0028-4793 0 Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors EC 1.14.99.1 Cyclooxygenase 1 EC 1.14.99.1 PTGS1 protein, human K7Q1JQR04M Dinoprostone R16CO5Y76E (...) Aspirin RXY07S6CZ2 Prostaglandin D2 AIM IM Aspirin adverse effects Asthma chemically induced Cyclooxygenase 1 metabolism Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors adverse effects Dinoprostone metabolism Homeostasis physiology Humans Nasal Polyps chemically induced Prostaglandin D2 metabolism Sinusitis chemically induced 2016 2 4 6 0 2016 2 4 6 0 2016 2 13 6 0 ppublish 26840139 10.1056/NEJMcibr1514013

2016 NEJM

139. Systematic review with meta analysis: Aspirin reduces cardiovascular events in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease but at a near equivalent risk of increased bleeding

Systematic review with meta analysis: Aspirin reduces cardiovascular events in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease but at a near equivalent risk of increased bleeding Aspirin reduces cardiovascular events in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease but at a near equivalent risk of increased bleeding | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time (...) . To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Aspirin reduces cardiovascular events in primary prevention of cardiovascular

2016 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

140. Aspirin Use to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease and Colorectal Cancer: Preventive Medication

Aspirin Use to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease and Colorectal Cancer: Preventive Medication Final Update Summary: Aspirin Use to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease and Colorectal Cancer: Preventive Medication - US Preventive Services Task Force Search USPSTF Website Text size: Assembly version: 1.0.0.308 Last Build: 11/16/2018 6:27:19 PM You are here: Final Summary Aspirin Use to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease and Colorectal Cancer: Preventive Medication Release Date: April 2016 Recommendation (...) Summary Population Recommendation Grade Adults aged 50 to 59 years with a ≥10% 10-year CVD risk The USPSTF recommends initiating low-dose aspirin use for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and colorectal cancer (CRC) in adults aged 50 to 59 years who have a 10% or greater 10-year CVD risk, are not at increased risk for bleeding, have a life expectancy of at least 10 years, and are willing to take low-dose aspirin daily for at least 10 years. Adults aged 60 to 69 years with a ≥10

2016 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force