Latest & greatest articles for aspirin

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Aspirin

Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) more commonly known as aspirin is a painkiller that has a wide range of uses. It is frequently used to treat fever, mild pain, tooth aches, headaches and muscle aches. Aspirin is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and can be used in the management of conditions such as heart attack, arthritis, blood clots and stroke. Aspirin, has been used for thousands of years, initially extracted from the leaves of willow trees.

Aspirin works in much the same way as other NSAIDs but has additional properties, such as antiplatelet activity which can make it additionally useful. More recently aspirin has been linked with cancer prevention. But the potential benefits of aspirin need to be weighed against the potential side effects, which includes gastrointestinal bleeding and Reye’s syndrome. It should be noted that aspirin should not be used in people who are allergic to drugs such as ibuprofen or a more generalized intolerance to NSAIDs. It should also be used cautiously in asthmatics and/or those with bronchospasm associated with NSAID use.

Research evidence, clinical trials and guidelines on Aspirin

The Trip Database has an extensive collection of articles on aspirin ranging from clinical trials, systematic reviews, clinical guidelines and case reports. These can be found via searching the site.

Top results for aspirin

161. Low-Dose Aspirin Use for the Prevention of Morbidity and Mortality From Preeclampsia: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. (PubMed)

Low-Dose Aspirin Use for the Prevention of Morbidity and Mortality From Preeclampsia: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. Update of the 1996 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on aspirin prophylaxis in pregnancy.The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the effectiveness of low-dose aspirin in preventing preeclampsia in women at increased risk and in decreasing adverse maternal and perinatal health outcomes, and assessed the maternal and fetal harms (...) of low-dose aspirin during pregnancy.This recommendation applies to asymptomatic pregnant women who are at increased risk for preeclampsia and who have no prior adverse effects with or contraindications to low-dose aspirin.The USPSTF recommends the use of low-dose aspirin (81 mg/d) as preventive medication after 12 weeks of gestation in women who are at high risk for preeclampsia. (B recommendation).

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2014 Annals of Internal Medicine

162. Aspirin as adjunctive treatment for giant cell arteritis. (PubMed)

Aspirin as adjunctive treatment for giant cell arteritis. Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a common inflammatory condition that affects medium and large-sized arteries and can cause sudden, permanent blindness. At present there is no alternative to early treatment with high-dose corticosteroids as the recommended standard management. Corticosteroid-induced side effects can develop and further disease-related ischaemic complications can still occur. Alternative and adjunctive therapies are sought (...) . Aspirin has been shown to have effects on the immune-mediated inflammation in GCA, hence it may reduce damage caused in the arterial wall.To assess the safety and effectiveness of low-dose aspirin, as an adjunctive, in the treatment of giant cell arteritis (GCA).We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2013, Issue 12), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to January 2014

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2014 Cochrane

163. Aspirin and/or heparin for women with unexplained recurrent miscarriage with or without inherited thrombophilia. (PubMed)

Aspirin and/or heparin for women with unexplained recurrent miscarriage with or without inherited thrombophilia. Since hypercoagulability might result in recurrent miscarriage, anticoagulant agents could potentially increase the chance of live birth in subsequent pregnancies in women with unexplained recurrent miscarriage, with or without inherited thrombophilia.To evaluate the efficacy and safety of anticoagulant agents, such as aspirin and heparin, in women with a history of at least two (...) unexplained miscarriages with or without inherited thrombophilia.We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (1 October 2013) and scanned bibliographies of all located articles for any unidentified articles.Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials that assessed the effect of anticoagulant treatment on live birth in women with a history of at least two unexplained miscarriages with or without inherited thrombophilia were eligible. Interventions included aspirin

2014 Cochrane

164. Aspirin for VTE prophylaxis in hip and knee replacement surgery

Aspirin for VTE prophylaxis in hip and knee replacement surgery Aspirin for VTE prophylaxis in hip and knee replacement surgery Aspirin for VTE prophylaxis in hip and knee replacement surgery Mitchell MD, Williams K Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Mitchell MD, Williams K. Aspirin for VTE prophylaxis in hip and knee replacement surgery (...) . Philadelphia: Center for Evidence-based Practice (CEP). 2014 Final publication URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip; Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee; Aspirins; Venous Thromboembolism Language Published English Country of organisation United States English summary An English language summary is available. Address for correspondence Center for Evidence-based Practice, University of Pennsylvania Health System, 3535 Market St. Suite 50, Philadelphia PA 19104

2014 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

165. Low-dose aspirin for prevention of morbidity and mortality from pre-eclampsia: a systematic evidence review for the U.S Preventive Services Task Force

Low-dose aspirin for prevention of morbidity and mortality from pre-eclampsia: a systematic evidence review for the U.S Preventive Services Task Force Low-dose aspirin for prevention of morbidity and mortality from preeclampsia: a systematic evidence review for the U.S Preventive Services Task Force Low-dose aspirin for prevention of morbidity and mortality from preeclampsia: a systematic evidence review for the U.S Preventive Services Task Force Henderson JT, Whitlock EP, O'Connor E, Senger CA (...) , Thompson JH, Rowland MG CRD summary Based on available evidence, this good-quality review concluded that daily low-dose aspirin had modest but important benefits for preventing preeclampsia and consequent illness in high-risk women during pregnancy, although rare or long-term harms could not be ruled out. The authors identified uncertainties in the evidence and their carefully considered conclusions are likely to be reliable. Authors' objectives To review the benefits and harms of low-dose aspirin

2014 DARE.

166. Low-dose aspirin for the prevention of morbidity and mortality from pre-eclampsia: a systematic evidence review for the U.S. preventive services task force

Low-dose aspirin for the prevention of morbidity and mortality from pre-eclampsia: a systematic evidence review for the U.S. preventive services task force Low-dose aspirin for the prevention of morbidity and mortality from pre-eclampsia: a systematic evidence review for the U.S. preventive services task force Low-dose aspirin for the prevention of morbidity and mortality from pre-eclampsia: a systematic evidence review for the U.S. preventive services task force Henderson JT, Whitlock EP (...) , O'Connor E, Senger CA, Thompson JH, Rowland MG Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Henderson JT, Whitlock EP, O'Connor E, Senger CA, Thompson JH, Rowland MG. Low-dose aspirin for the prevention of morbidity and mortality from pre-eclampsia: a systematic evidence review for the U.S. preventive services task force. Rockville: Agency

2014 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

167. Low-dose aspirin for prevention of morbidity and mortality from preeclampsia: a systematic evidence review for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. (PubMed)

Low-dose aspirin for prevention of morbidity and mortality from preeclampsia: a systematic evidence review for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Preeclampsia is a leading cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality.To systematically review benefits and harms of low-dose aspirin for preventing morbidity and mortality from preeclampsia.MEDLINE, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, PubMed, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (January 2006 to June 2013 (...) , in addition to 6 RCTs and 2 observational studies of average-risk women to assess harms (7 good-quality). Depending on baseline risk, aspirin use was associated with absolute risk reductions of 2% to 5% for preeclampsia (relative risk [RR], 0.76 [95% CI, 0.62 to 0.95]), 1% to 5% for intrauterine growth restriction (RR, 0.80 [CI, 0.65 to 0.99]), and 2% to 4% for preterm birth (RR, 0.86 [CI, 0.76 to 0.98]). No significant perinatal or maternal harms were identified, but rare harms could not be ruled out

2014 Annals of Internal Medicine

168. Aspirin versus vitamin K antagonist treatment guided by transoesophageal echocardiography in patients with atrial fibrillation: a pilot study (PubMed)

Aspirin versus vitamin K antagonist treatment guided by transoesophageal echocardiography in patients with atrial fibrillation: a pilot study Current stroke risk schemes need improvement of predictive value in patients with atrial fibrillation. Transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) may facilitate stroke risk assessment in such patients and guide antithrombotic treatment.We randomised 238 patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation and a moderate stroke risk to aspirin or adjusted vitamin K (...) antagonist therapy after TEE had ruled out thrombogenic features in the atria and aorta. The primary outcome was a composite of stroke, major bleeding, peripheral embolism and all-cause mortality.Mean CHA2DS2-VASc score was 2.1±1.1. The incidences of the composite primary outcome at a mean follow-up of 1.6 years were 3.2% (2.02% per year) in the aspirin group compared to 6.1% (3.84% per year) in the vitamin K antagonists group with an absolute advantage of 2.9 percentage points. Aspirin was non-inferior

2014 EvidenceUpdates

169. Randomised controlled trial: Questions linger over POISE-2 and perioperative aspirin management

Randomised controlled trial: Questions linger over POISE-2 and perioperative aspirin management Questions linger over POISE-2 and perioperative aspirin management | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional (...) accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Questions linger over POISE-2 and perioperative aspirin management Article Text Therapeutics Randomised controlled trial Questions linger over POISE-2 and perioperative aspirin management Neal Stuart Gerstein 1 , Gerald

2014 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

170. Aspirin

Aspirin USE OF ASPIRIN IN PREGNANCY 0344 892 0909 USE OF ASPIRIN IN PREGNANCY (Date of issue: July 2014 , Version: 2 ) This is a UKTIS monograph for use by health care professionals. For case-specific advice please contact UKTIS on 0344 892 0909. To report an exposure please download and complete a . Please encourage all women to complete an . A corresponding patient information leaflet on is available at . Summary Low-dose aspirin (75-300mg/day) is used as an antiplatelet medication (...) in the prophylaxis of thromboembolic cerebrovascular disease, myocardial infarction and pre-eclampsia. Higher doses of aspirin (up to 4g/day) are used in the control of mild to moderate pain and pyrexia. There is a large body of evidence that shows no association between the use of low-dose aspirin (LDA) during pregnancy and increased risk of spontaneous abortion or stillbirth. Fewer data are available regarding aspirin use at analgesic doses, but again no association with these two outcomes has been reported

2014 UK Teratology Information Service

171. Aspirin overdose

Aspirin overdose ASPIRIN OVERDOSE IN PREGNANCY 0344 892 0909 ASPIRIN OVERDOSE IN PREGNANCY (Date of issue: December 2012 , Version: 2 ) This is a UKTIS monograph for use by health care professionals. For case-specific advice please contact UKTIS on 0344 892 0909. To report an exposure please download and complete a . Please encourage all women to complete an . Summary Low-dose aspirin (75-300mg/day) is used as an antiplatelet medication to reduce the risk of thrombosis in cerebrovascular (...) disease and myocardial infarction, and in the prevention of pre-eclampsia. Higher doses of aspirin (up to 4g/day) are used in the control of mild to moderate pain and pyrexia. Various malformations have been reported following therapeutic maternal use of aspirin during pregnancy, however with the exception of a possible increased incidence of gastroschisis, no specific pattern of malformations has been observed and a causative role for aspirin has not been proven. The available data on fetal outcome

2014 UK Teratology Information Service

172. Low-Dose Aspirin Use for the Prevention of Morbidity and Mortality From Preeclampsia: Preventive Medication

Low-Dose Aspirin Use for the Prevention of Morbidity and Mortality From Preeclampsia: Preventive Medication Final Update Summary: Low-Dose Aspirin Use for the Prevention of Morbidity and Mortality From Preeclampsia: Preventive Medication - US Preventive Services Task Force Search USPSTF Website Text size: Assembly version: 1.0.0.308 Last Build: 11/16/2018 6:27:19 PM You are here: Final Summary Low-Dose Aspirin Use for the Prevention of Morbidity and Mortality From Preeclampsia: Preventive (...) Medication Release Date: September 2014 Recommendation Summary Low-Dose Aspirin Use for the Prevention of Morbidity and Mortality From Preeclampsia Population Recommendation Grade Pregnant Women Who Are At High Risk for Preeclampsia The USPSTF recommends the use of low-dose aspirin (81 mg/d) as preventive medication after 12 weeks of gestation in women who are at high risk for preeclampsia. ( ) Related Information for Consumers Related Information for Health Professionals There is no related information

2014 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

173. Safety of renal biopsy for patients taking aspirin

Safety of renal biopsy for patients taking aspirin Safety of renal biopsy for patients taking aspirin Safety of renal biopsy for patients taking aspirin Mitchell MD, Berns JS, Rudnick MR, Umscheid CA Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Mitchell MD, Berns JS, Rudnick MR, Umscheid CA. Safety of renal biopsy for patients taking (...) aspirin. Philadelphia: Center for Evidence-based Practice (CEP). 2014 Final publication URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Aspirin; Biopsy; Humans; Nephrectomy; Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors Language Published English Country of organisation United States English summary An English language summary is available. Address for correspondence Center for Evidence-based Practice, University of Pennsylvania Health System, 3535 Market St. Suite 50, Philadelphia PA 19104 Email: Cep2

2014 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

174. Cohort study: Long-term aspirin use and neovascular age-related macular degeneration: association or causation?

Cohort study: Long-term aspirin use and neovascular age-related macular degeneration: association or causation? Long-term aspirin use and neovascular age-related macular degeneration: association or causation? | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password (...) For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Long-term aspirin use and neovascular age-related macular degeneration: association or causation? Article Text Aetiology Cohort study Long-term aspirin use and neovascular age

2014 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

175. Preconception low-dose aspirin and pregnancy outcomes: results from the EAGeR randomised trial. (PubMed)

Preconception low-dose aspirin and pregnancy outcomes: results from the EAGeR randomised trial. Preconception-initiated low-dose aspirin might positively affect pregnancy outcomes, but this possibility has not been adequately assessed. Our aim was to investigate whether low-dose aspirin improved livebirth rates in women with one to two previous pregnancy losses.In this multicentre, block-randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, women aged 18-40 years who were attempting to become (...) pregnant were recruited from four medical centres in the USA. Participants were stratified by eligibility criteria--the original stratum was restricted to women with one loss at less than 20 weeks' gestation during the previous year, whereas the expanded stratum included women with one to two previous losses, with no restrictions on gestational age or time of loss. Women were block-randomised by centre and eligibility stratum in a 1:1 ratio. Preconception-initiated daily low-dose aspirin (81 mg per day

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2014 Lancet

176. Aspirin in Patients Undergoing Noncardiac Surgery. (PubMed)

Aspirin in Patients Undergoing Noncardiac Surgery. There is substantial variability in the perioperative administration of aspirin in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery, both among patients who are already on an aspirin regimen and among those who are not.Using a 2-by-2 factorial trial design, we randomly assigned 10,010 patients who were preparing to undergo noncardiac surgery and were at risk for vascular complications to receive aspirin or placebo and clonidine or placebo. The results (...) of the aspirin trial are reported here. The patients were stratified according to whether they had not been taking aspirin before the study (initiation stratum, with 5628 patients) or they were already on an aspirin regimen (continuation stratum, with 4382 patients). Patients started taking aspirin (at a dose of 200 mg) or placebo just before surgery and continued it daily (at a dose of 100 mg) for 30 days in the initiation stratum and for 7 days in the continuation stratum, after which patients resumed

2014 NEJM

177. Cohort study: In infants born extremely preterm, aspirin or NSAID use during pregnancy are associated with increased risk of quadriparetic cerebral palsy

Cohort study: In infants born extremely preterm, aspirin or NSAID use during pregnancy are associated with increased risk of quadriparetic cerebral palsy In infants born extremely preterm, aspirin or NSAID use during pregnancy are associated with increased risk of quadriparetic cerebral palsy | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we (...) use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here In infants born extremely preterm, aspirin or NSAID use during pregnancy are associated

2014 Evidence-Based Nursing

178. Aspirin for prophylactic use in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease and cancer. A systematic review and overview of reviews

Aspirin for prophylactic use in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease and cancer. A systematic review and overview of reviews Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2013 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

179. Aspirin for prophylactic use in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease and cancer: a systematic review and overview of reviews

Aspirin for prophylactic use in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease and cancer: a systematic review and overview of reviews DOI 10.3310/hta17430 Aspirin for prophylactic use in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease and cancer: a systematic review and overview of reviews P Sutcliffe, M Connock, T Gurung, K Freeman, S Johnson, N-B Kandala, A Grove, B Gurung, S Morrow and A Clarke HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT VOLUME 17 ISSUE 43 SEPTEMBER 2013 ISSN 1366-5278Aspirin (...) , Freeman K, Johnson S, Kandala N-B, et al. Aspirin for prophylactic use in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease and cancer: a systematic review and overview of reviews. Health Technol Assess 2013;17(43). Health Technology Assessment is indexed and abstracted in Index Medicus/MEDLINE, Excerpta Medica/EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch ® ) and Current Contents ® / Clinical Medicine.Health Technology Assessment NICE TAR and DAR ISSN 1366-5278 (Print) ISSN 2046-4924 (Online

2013 NIHR HTA programme

180. Meta-Analysis of Cilostazol Versus Aspirin for the Secondary Prevention of Stroke (PubMed)

Meta-Analysis of Cilostazol Versus Aspirin for the Secondary Prevention of Stroke Aspirin is the most widely prescribed antiplatelet agent for the secondary prevention of stroke. Cilostazol, an antiplatelet and vasodilating agent, has shown promise for the secondary prevention of stroke. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials using Ovid MEDLINE, PubMed, and Excerpta Medica (EMBASE) was searched up to October 2012. Four trials, in 3,917 patients, comparing (...) cilostazol with aspirin were identified. Compared with aspirin, cilostazol was associated with a 73% reduction in hemorrhagic stroke (relative risk [RR] 0.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.13 to 0.54, p = 0.0002), 28% reduction in the composite end point of stroke, myocardial infarction, or vascular death (RR 0.72, 95% CI 0.57 to 0.89, p = 0.003), and 48% reduction in total hemorrhagic events (RR 0.52, 95% CI 0.34 to 0.79, p = 0.002), with trend for lesser gastrointestinal bleeds (RR 0.60, 95% CI 0.34

2013 EvidenceUpdates