Latest & greatest articles for babies

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This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on babies and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Top results for babies

201. Two controlled trials of dry artificial surfactant: early effects and later outcome in babies with surfactant deficiency. (PubMed)

Two controlled trials of dry artificial surfactant: early effects and later outcome in babies with surfactant deficiency. Dry powdered surfactant was used in two randomised, controlled trials to study its immediate effects, influence on mortality, and safety in babies born after less than 32 weeks' gestation. The lecithin/sphingomyelin (L/S) ratio was measured in pharyngeal aspirate taken before surfactant therapy to establish surfactant deficiency. 32 babies intubated during resuscitation (...) (trial I) and a group of 24 other babies, all with immature L/S ratios, in whom severe hyaline membrane disease developed (trial II), were stratified for sex. In half 25 mg surfactant was insufflated through the endotracheal tube; it could be detected in tracheal secretions for at least the next 24 h. There was no significant difference in ventilator pressures or oxygen therapy used nor in neonatal mortality and morbidity in the first 2 years of life between the surfactant-treated and control groups

1985 Lancet

202. Pancuronium prevents pneumothoraces in ventilated premature babies who actively expire against positive pressure inflation. (PubMed)

Pancuronium prevents pneumothoraces in ventilated premature babies who actively expire against positive pressure inflation. Preterm infants who were making expiratory efforts against ventilator inflation were randomised to be paralysed with pancuronium or to receive no paralysing agent during ventilation. Pneumothoraces developed in all 11 unparalysed babies but in only 1 of 11 (p less than 0.0004) of those managed with pancuronium, which had no serious side-effects. In 34 infants excluded from

1984 Lancet

203. Weight gain and movement patterns of very low birthweight babies nursed on lambswool. (PubMed)

Weight gain and movement patterns of very low birthweight babies nursed on lambswool. 34 very low birthweight babies (mean 1143 g) in incubators were randomly assigned to be continuously nursed on lambswool (n = 17) or ordinary cotton sheets (n = 17). The weight gain for the periods when babies were well was significantly larger for the wool group, 22.7 g/day vs 18.6 g/day for cotton control (p less than 0.02). The overall weight gain (which included weight change during periods of illness (...) ) revealed a similar picture in favour of the wool group, 21.5 g/day vs 18.2 g/day (p less than 0.05). Movement patterns for the two groups showed no differences, but for all babies a strong correlation was noted between moving and lying suspine (p less than 0.001), having eyes open (p less than 0.001), a cooler incubator (p less than 0.01), and faster weight gain (p less than 0.01). Lambswool seems to have advantages over cotton sheets as a bedding material for very low birth weight babies.

1983 Lancet

204. When should pre-term babies be sent home from neonatal units? (PubMed)

When should pre-term babies be sent home from neonatal units? 20 randomly selected infants of 33 weeks gestation and under at birth were allowed to go home from the neonatal unit provided they were clinically well and had passed the nadir of their postnatal weight-loss and provided home conditions were satisfactory. Weight-gain at home was satisfactory and there was no increased rate of hospital readmission compared with 20 randomly selected pre-term infants who were discharged at a more

1979 Lancet