Latest & greatest articles for babies

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on babies or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on babies and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Top results for babies

101. Antenatal blood pressure for prediction of pre-eclampsia, preterm birth, and small for gestational age babies: development and validation in two general population cohorts. (PubMed)

Antenatal blood pressure for prediction of pre-eclampsia, preterm birth, and small for gestational age babies: development and validation in two general population cohorts. Can routine antenatal blood pressure measurements between 20 and 36 weeks' gestation contribute to the prediction of pre-eclampsia and its associated adverse outcomes?This study used repeated antenatal measurements of blood pressure from 12 996 women in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) to develop

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2015 BMJ

102. Early detection of parenting and developmental problems in toddlers: A randomized trial of home visits versus well-baby clinic visits in the Netherlands (PubMed)

Early detection of parenting and developmental problems in toddlers: A randomized trial of home visits versus well-baby clinic visits in the Netherlands The early detection of parenting and developmental problems by preventive child health care (CHC) services in the Netherlands takes place almost exclusively at the well-baby clinic. This study assesses whether, compared to a visit to the well-baby clinic, a home visit improves early detection.4481 eligible 18-month-old children (...) and their parents were randomized to either a visit to the well-baby clinic or a home visit in the period from December 2006 to January 2008. A CHC nurse held structured interviews using the validated Structured Problem Analysis of Raising Kids (SPARK). Differences in the percentage of children with high or increased risks of parenting and developmental problems as assessed by the SPARK were analyzed with ordinal regression. Secondary outcomes included the percentage of parents attending, parents' concerns

2015 EvidenceUpdates

103. Probiotics and crying time in babies with infantile colic

Probiotics and crying time in babies with infantile colic BestBets: Probiotics and crying time in babies with infantile colic Probiotics and crying time in babies with infantile colic Report By: Nina Batchelor, Jennifer Kelly, Hyun Choi, Brona Geary - GPST1, FY2 Institution: University Hospital Lewisham Date Submitted: 5th April 2015 Date Completed: 1st July 2015 Last Modified: 1st July 2015 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [babies presenting with infantile colic], does [the use (...) of probiotics] [reduce crying time]? Clinical Scenario A mother attends the Emergency Department with her breastfed 8-week-old baby girl who is crying inconsolably. History and examination point towards a diagnosis of infantile colic. You wonder whether you should suggest a proprietary over-the-counter remedy or whether you should just say that this is a self-limiting condition. A passing paediatrician notices your dilemma and suggests probiotic therapy to reduce the baby's distress. You wonder

2015 BestBETS

104. Exercise Supplement Creatine May Prevent Brain Injury in Unborn Babies

Exercise Supplement Creatine May Prevent Brain Injury in Unborn Babies Exercise Supplement Creatine May Prevent Brain Injury in Unborn Babies - Evidently Cochrane Search and hit Go By January 30, 2015 // Experiments in animals suggest the exercise supplement Creatine may prevent a baby’s brain being damaged during pregnancy and childbirth. Human studies are needed. Creatine packs a punch at the gym Creatine is a popular nutritional supplement among athletes as it improves muscle performance (...) in healthy individuals. Athletes rave about the flavoured powder which, when mixed with water or milk, produces a “delicious energy shake”. Athletes believe Creatine can sustain their performance during short but intense periods of exercise such as weight training, sprinting, and baseball. It works by releasing energy during periods of high and fluctuating energy demand. Creatine may hold the key to preventing an unborn baby’s brain from being injured during pregnancy and childbirth. Why pregnancy

2015 Evidently Cochrane

105. Randomised controlled trial: Antithrombotic therapy for pregnancy complications: let's not throw the baby out with the bath water

Randomised controlled trial: Antithrombotic therapy for pregnancy complications: let's not throw the baby out with the bath water Antithrombotic therapy for pregnancy complications: let's not throw the baby out with the bath water | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username (...) and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Antithrombotic therapy for pregnancy complications: let's not throw the baby out with the bath water Article Text Therapeutics/prevention Randomised controlled trial

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2015 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

106. Choosing how to birth your baby: A decision aid for women with a previous caesarean section

Choosing how to birth your baby: A decision aid for women with a previous caesarean section Choosing how to birth your baby: A decision aid for women with a previous caesarean sectionThis decision aid has been written to support women who have had one or more previous caesareans, to know what to expect and have a say in making decisions about the way they would like to birth. This decision aid provides information about two options: 1 Choose to have a vaginal birth after caesarean (VBAC) 2 (...) Choose to have a planned repeat caesarean section This decision aid will answer the following questions: » What are my options when choosing to birth my baby after a previous caesarean section? » What happens if I choose to have a vaginal birth after caesarean? » What happens if I choose to have a planned repeat caesarean section? » Will I always be able to choose? » How might I choose between a VBAC and a planned repeat caesarean section? » What are the differences between having a VBAC and having

2015 EUnetHTA

107. Choices about clamping your baby?s umbilical cord: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth

Choices about clamping your baby?s umbilical cord: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth Choices about clamping your baby’s umbilical cord: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birthThis decision aid has been written to support women having an actively managed third stage of labour to know what to expect and to have a say in making decisions about clamping their baby’s umbilical cord. An actively managed third stage of labour is when a woman is given Syntocinon® to help her birth (...) the placenta. Syntocinon® makes the uterus continue contracting after the baby is born. The alternative to active management is a physiological third stage of labour. A physiological third stage of labour is when a woman relies on her own production of oxytocin (a natural hormone produced during labour and birth) to birth her placenta. Oxytocin makes a woman’s uterus continue contracting after her baby is born and helps the placenta separate from the uterus. In Queensland, if a woman does not choose

2015 EUnetHTA

108. Monitoring your baby during labour: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth

Monitoring your baby during labour: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth Monitoring your baby during labour A decision aid for women having a vaginal birthThis decision aid has been written to support women planning a vaginal birth to know what to expect, and to have a say in making decisions about how their baby will be monitored during labour and birth. This decision aid provides information about two options: 1. Choose to have intermittent monitoring 2. Choose to have continuous (...) monitoring This decision aid will answer the following questions: » What is monitoring? » Why might my baby be monitored during labour? » How can my baby be monitored during labour? » How accurate is monitoring? » What are my options? » What happens if I choose intermittent monitoring? » What happens if I choose continuous monitoring? » Will I always be able to choose? » How might I choose between intermittent monitoring and continuous monitoring? » What are the differences between intermittent

2015 EUnetHTA

109. A decision aid for women having their first baby and considering their choices for labour pain relief

A decision aid for women having their first baby and considering their choices for labour pain relief 1 PAIN RELIEF FOR LABOUR For women having their first baby 2 59 Please note: Research studies that support statements made in this book have been referenced by a number. The complete list of references is at the back of the book. All differences are statistically significant, see “More Information”. The information in this book is correct at the time of publication. However, as research (...) . S69-S77. 18. Paech, M.J., R. Godkin, and S. Webster, Complications of obstetric epidural analgesia and anaesthesia: a prospective analysis of 10995 cases. Int J Obstet Anesth, 1998. 7: p. 5-11. Contributors This booklet is designed to help you make informed choices about pain relief for your labour and birth. The information is written for women having their first baby and has been assessed by women just like you. Development and review were conducted by: Dr Christine Roberts Clinical

2015 SickKids Supportive Care Guidelines

110. A decision aid for pregnant woman with a breech baby

A decision aid for pregnant woman with a breech baby A decision aid for women Making choices: options for a pregnant woman with a breech baby This workbook and tape/CD will prepare you for an informed discussion with your doctor or midwife. It will give you information about the two options available to you when having a breech baby. Instructions: 1. Set aside 30-40 minutes 2. Have a pencil ready 3. Place the cassette tape/CD in the player and press play 4. Stay on the page until you are asked (...) to turn to the next page Please Note: Research studies that support the information provided in this workbook are referenced by numbers such as “1”. The complete list of references is at the back of this workbook. Welcome 1 • a breech baby • turning a breech baby using external cephalic version (ECV) • the benefits and risks of ECV • a planned caesarean section if you don’t choose ECV • how to weigh up your own reasons to choose or not to choose an ECV • decisions made by other women This decision aid

2015 SickKids Supportive Care Guidelines

111. Baby-led compared with scheduled (or mixed) breastfeeding for successful breastfeeding. (PubMed)

Baby-led compared with scheduled (or mixed) breastfeeding for successful breastfeeding. Baby-led breastfeeding is recommended as best practice in determining the frequency and duration of a breastfeed. An alternative approach is described as scheduled, where breastfeeding is timed and restricted in frequency and duration. It is necessary to review the evidence that supports current recommendations, so that mothers are provided with high-quality evidence to inform their feeding decisions.To (...) evaluate the effects of baby-led compared with scheduled (or mixed) breastfeeding for successful breastfeeding, for healthy newborns.We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (13 November 2013), CINAHL (1981 to 13 November 2013), EThOS, Index to Theses and ProQuest database and World Health Organization's 1998 evidence to support the 'Ten Steps' to successful breastfeeding (6 November 2013).Randomised and quasi-randomised trials with randomisation at both the individual

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2014 Cochrane

112. Who has been caring for the baby? (PubMed)

Who has been caring for the baby? Nearly a decade ago, The Lancet published the Neonatal Survival Series, with an ambitious call for integration of newborn care across the continuum of reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health and nutrition (RMNCH). In this first of five papers in the Every Newborn Series, we consider what has changed during this decade, assessing progress on the basis of a systematic policy heuristic including agenda-setting, policy formulation and adoption, leadership

2014 Lancet

113. Can available interventions end preventable deaths in mothers, newborn babies, and stillbirths, and at what cost? (PubMed)

Can available interventions end preventable deaths in mothers, newborn babies, and stillbirths, and at what cost? Progress in newborn survival has been slow, and even more so for reductions in stillbirths. To meet Every Newborn targets of ten or fewer neonatal deaths and ten or fewer stillbirths per 1000 births in every country by 2035 will necessitate accelerated scale-up of the most effective care targeting major causes of newborn deaths. We have systematically reviewed interventions across (...) the continuum of care and various delivery platforms, and then modelled the effect and cost of scale-up in the 75 high-burden Countdown countries. Closure of the quality gap through the provision of effective care for all women and newborn babies delivering in facilities could prevent an estimated 113,000 maternal deaths, 531,000 stillbirths, and 1·325 million neonatal deaths annually by 2020 at an estimated running cost of US$4·5 billion per year (US$0·9 per person). Increased coverage and quality

2014 Lancet

114. Relieve baby’s pain without drugs. Little things that help during a painful procedure

Relieve baby’s pain without drugs. Little things that help during a painful procedure Relieve baby’s pain without drugs. Little things that help during a painful procedure | Evidently Cochrane sharing the latest Cochrane Reviews Search Main menu Post navigation by Key message: if your baby has to have a painful procedure, evidence shows that there are things you can do to minimise their pain, including holding their bare chest to yours, giving a sugar solution or breast milk and allowing them (...) to suck or to breastfeed. Nothing cuts a parent to the quick like seeing their child in pain, especially new mums (in whom, as I well remember, even the mildest news item can prompt a fresh bout of weeping). We’d rather take anything ourselves than have our children suffer, even briefly, wouldn’t we? For babies born prematurely or in need of medical intervention, potentially painful procedures go with the territory. Giving painkilling drugs can be problematic and creams that numb the skin have

2014 Evidently Cochrane

115. Relieve baby’s pain without drugs. Little things that help during a painful procedure

Relieve baby’s pain without drugs. Little things that help during a painful procedure Relieve baby’s pain without drugs. Little things that help during a painful procedure | Evidently Cochrane sharing the latest Cochrane Reviews Search Main menu Post navigation by Key message: if your baby has to have a painful procedure, evidence shows that there are things you can do to minimise their pain, including holding their bare chest to yours, giving a sugar solution or breast milk and allowing them (...) to suck or to breastfeed. Nothing cuts a parent to the quick like seeing their child in pain, especially new mums (in whom, as I well remember, even the mildest news item can prompt a fresh bout of weeping). We’d rather take anything ourselves than have our children suffer, even briefly, wouldn’t we? For babies born prematurely or in need of medical intervention, potentially painful procedures go with the territory. Giving painkilling drugs can be problematic and creams that numb the skin have

2014 Evidently Cochrane

116. Relieve baby’s pain without drugs. Little things that help during a painful procedure

Relieve baby’s pain without drugs. Little things that help during a painful procedure Relieve baby's pain without drugs. Little things that help during a painful procedure - Evidently Cochrane Search and hit Go By February 28, 2014 // Key message: if your baby has to have a painful procedure, evidence shows that there are things you can do to minimise their pain, including holding their bare chest to yours, giving a sugar solution or breast milk and allowing them to suck or to breastfeed (...) . Nothing cuts a parent to the quick like seeing their child in pain, especially new mums (in whom, as I well remember, even the mildest news item can prompt a fresh bout of weeping). We’d rather take anything ourselves than have our children suffer, even briefly, wouldn’t we? For babies born prematurely or in need of medical intervention, potentially painful procedures go with the territory. Giving painkilling drugs can be problematic and creams that numb the skin have not been shown to be effective

2014 Evidently Cochrane

117. Relieve baby’s pain without drugs. Little things that help during a painful procedure

Relieve baby’s pain without drugs. Little things that help during a painful procedure Relieve baby’s pain without drugs. Little things that help during a painful procedure | Evidently Cochrane sharing the latest Cochrane Reviews Search Main menu Post navigation by Key message: if your baby has to have a painful procedure, evidence shows that there are things you can do to minimise their pain, including holding their bare chest to yours, giving a sugar solution or breast milk and allowing them (...) to suck or to breastfeed. Nothing cuts a parent to the quick like seeing their child in pain, especially new mums (in whom, as I well remember, even the mildest news item can prompt a fresh bout of weeping). We’d rather take anything ourselves than have our children suffer, even briefly, wouldn’t we? For babies born prematurely or in need of medical intervention, potentially painful procedures go with the territory. Giving painkilling drugs can be problematic and creams that numb the skin have

2014 Evidently Cochrane

118. Randomised controlled trial: Lifestyle interventions in obese and overweight pregnant women do not reduce the risk of large-for-gestational age babies

Randomised controlled trial: Lifestyle interventions in obese and overweight pregnant women do not reduce the risk of large-for-gestational age babies Lifestyle interventions in obese and overweight pregnant women do not reduce the risk of large-for-gestational age babies | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies (...) babies Article Text Prevention Randomised controlled trial Lifestyle interventions in obese and overweight pregnant women do not reduce the risk of large-for-gestational age babies Shakila Thangaratinam Statistics from Altmetric.com Commentary on: Dodd JM , Turnbull D , McPhee AJ , et al . Antenatal lifestyle advice for women who are overweight or obese: LIMIT randomised trial . Context Pregnant women who are overweight or obese and undergo excessive gestational weight gain are at risk of maternal

2014 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

119. Cohort study: Higher coffee intake in pregnancy linked to prolonged gestation, and higher caffeine intake linked with babies being small for gestational age

Cohort study: Higher coffee intake in pregnancy linked to prolonged gestation, and higher caffeine intake linked with babies being small for gestational age Higher coffee intake in pregnancy linked to prolonged gestation, and higher caffeine intake linked with babies being small for gestational age | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about (...) linked with babies being small for gestational age Article Text Midwifery Cohort study Higher coffee intake in pregnancy linked to prolonged gestation, and higher caffeine intake linked with babies being small for gestational age Caroline Hollins Martin Statistics from Altmetric.com Commentary on: Sengpiel V , Elind E , Bacelis J , et al . Maternal caffeine intake during pregnancy is associated with birth weight but not with gestational length: results from a large prospective observational cohort

2014 Evidence-Based Nursing

120. Intrapartum care for healthy women and babies

Intrapartum care for healthy women and babies Intr Intrapartum care for health apartum care for healthy women and y women and babies babies Clinical guideline Published: 3 December 2014 nice.org.uk/guidance/cg190 © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Y Y our responsibility our responsibility The recommendations in this guideline represent the view of NICE, arrived at after careful consideration (...) be inconsistent with complying with those duties. Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible. Intrapartum care for healthy women and babies (CG190) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 2 of 89Contents Contents Recommendations 5 1.1 Place

2014 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines