Latest & greatest articles for bronchiolitis

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on bronchiolitis or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on bronchiolitis and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Bronchiolitis

Bronchiolitis is mainly caused by the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). The virus travels down to the bronchioles in the lungs causing them to become inflamed making it difficult to breath.

Almost every child will be infected with RSV by the time they reach two years. Adults can also contract the virus, typically during winter months.

In mild cases bronchiolitis will clear up without treatment. The virus that causes bronchiolitis travels through tiny droplets of liquid and can be passed through the air or contracted by touching infected surfaces.

Symptoms include: Sore throat, dry cough, blocked nose and aches and pains throughout the body.

Although there is no cure for chronic bronchiolitis research and clinical studies on bronchiolitis suggest that some lifestyle changes can ease symptoms: avoid smoking, eat a healthy diet and maintain regular exercise. In extreme cases steroids can be prescribed to help minimise inflammation.

Read more on medications used to treat bronchiolitis and the causes of the virus.

Top results for bronchiolitis

101. Is nebulised salbutamol indicated in bronchiolitis?

Is nebulised salbutamol indicated in bronchiolitis? BestBets: Is nebulised salbutamol indicated in bronchiolitis? Is nebulised salbutamol indicated in bronchiolitis? Report By: Jayachandran Panickar - Consultant Respiratory Paediatrician Search checked by Michael Eisenhut - Consultant Paediatrician Institution: Central Manchester and Manchester Children's University Hospital Original institution: Luton and Dunstable Hospital Date Submitted: 18th December 2002 Date Completed: 14th January 2009 (...) Last Modified: 14th January 2009 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [infants with bronchiolitis] will a [treatment with nebulised salbutamol] reduce [the length of hospitalisation and clinical severity]. Clinical Scenario A 6 month old baby is admitted to hospital with a 4 day history of coryzal symptoms, cough, wheeze and poor feeding. Your clinical diagnosis is bronchiolitis. You wonder whether treatment with nebulised salbutamol would improve the clinical condition. Search Strategy

2009 BestBETS

102. Oral steroids are not indicated in bronchiolitis.

Oral steroids are not indicated in bronchiolitis. BestBets: Oral steroids are not indicated in bronchiolitis. Oral steroids are not indicated in bronchiolitis. Report By: Jayachandran Panickar - Consultant Respiratory Paediatrician Search checked by Michael Eisenhut - Consultant Paediatrician Institution: Central Manchester and Manchester Children's University Hospital Original institution: Luton and Dunstable Hospital Date Submitted: 23rd December 2002 Date Completed: 14th January 2009 Last (...) Modified: 14th January 2009 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [infants with bronchiolitis] do [oral steroids] reduce [clinical severity or length of hospital stay]. Clinical Scenario A 6 month old baby is admitted to hospital with a 4 day history of coryzal symptoms, cough, wheeze and decrease in feeds. Respiratory syncytial virus is detected in nasopharyngeal secretion. She is needing oxygen and is on a nasogastric feed. You wonder whether starting oral steroids will improve her clinical

2009 BestBETS

103. A randomized, controlled trial of nasal phenylephrine in infants hospitalized for bronchiolitis (PubMed)

A randomized, controlled trial of nasal phenylephrine in infants hospitalized for bronchiolitis To examine the hypothesis that pharmacologic treatment of nasal obstruction, specifically alpha-adrenergic nose drops, will decrease objective signs of respiratory distress in infants with bronchiolitis.Forty-one infants aged 3 weeks to 12 months hospitalized for viral bronchiolitis were enrolled in this double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial of topical 0.5% phenylephrine drops. The primary outcome (...) improvements in clinical status in infants hospitalized for acute bronchiolitis.

2008 EvidenceUpdates

104. Nebulized hypertonic saline solution for acute bronchiolitis in infants. (PubMed)

Nebulized hypertonic saline solution for acute bronchiolitis in infants. Airway edema and mucus plugging are the predominant pathological features in infants with acute viral bronchiolitis. Nebulized hypertonic saline solution may reduce these pathological changes and decrease airway obstruction.To assess the effects of nebulized hypertonic saline solution in infants with acute viral bronchiolitis.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library (...) and study quality assessment. We pooled the data from individual trials using the Cochrane statistical package Review Manager (RevMan).We included four trials involving 254 infants with acute viral bronchiolitis (189 inpatients and 65 outpatients) in this review. Patients treated with nebulized 3% saline had a significantly shorter mean length of hospital stay compared to those treated with nebulized 0.9% saline (mean difference (MD) -0.94 days, 95% CI -1.48 to -0.40, P = 0.0006). The 3% saline group

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2008 Cochrane

105. Chest physiotherapy is not useful in bronchiolitis.

Chest physiotherapy is not useful in bronchiolitis. BestBets: Chest physiotherapy is not useful in bronchiolitis. Chest physiotherapy is not useful in bronchiolitis. Report By: Jayachandran Panickar - Consultant Respiratory Paediatrician Search checked by Michael Eisenhut - Consultant Paediatrician Institution: Central Manchester & Manchester Children's University Hospital and Luton and Dunstable Hospital NHS Foundation Trust Date Submitted: 15th May 2008 Last Modified: 19th September 2008 (...) Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [infants with bronchiolitis] does [physiotherapy] reduce [duration of illness, clinical severity or length of hospital stay] Clinical Scenario A 6 month old baby is admitted to hospital with a 4 day history of coryzal symptoms, increasing cough, wheeze and decreased feeding. Respiratory syncytial virus was detected in nasopharyngeal secretions. She is needing oxygen and is on nasogastric feed. You wonder whether starting physiotherapy will improve her

2008 BestBETS

106. Increasing burden and risk factors for bronchiolitis-related medical visits in infants enrolled in a state health care insurance plan (PubMed)

Increasing burden and risk factors for bronchiolitis-related medical visits in infants enrolled in a state health care insurance plan The goals were to estimate the year-round burden of health care visits attributable to bronchiolitis and to identify risk factors for bronchiolitis in term healthy infants.We conducted a population-based, retrospective cohort study of 103 670 term, non-low birth weight infants enrolled in Tennessee Medicaid in 1995-2003. We monitored infants through the first (...) year of life. Risk factors for bronchiolitis during infancy and rates of inpatient, emergency department, and outpatient visits during the study period were calculated by using claims data.Over the 9 study years, rates of bronchiolitis visits were 238 outpatient visits per 1000 infant-years, 77 emergency department visits per 1000 infant-years, and 71 hospitalizations per 1000 infant-years. Average annual rates of bronchiolitis visits increased 41%, from 188 visits per 1000 infant-years to 265

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2008 EvidenceUpdates

107. Nebulized hypertonic saline in the treatment of viral bronchiolitis in infants

Nebulized hypertonic saline in the treatment of viral bronchiolitis in infants PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

2008 PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club

108. Randomised controlled trial of nasal continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) in bronchiolitis (PubMed)

Randomised controlled trial of nasal continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) in bronchiolitis To compare continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) with standard treatment (ST) in the management of bronchiolitis.Children <1 year of age with bronchiolitis and capillary PCO2 >6 kPa were recruited and randomised to CPAP or ST and then crossed over to the alternative treatment after 12 h. ST was intravenous fluids and supplemental oxygen by nasal prongs or face mask. The change in PCO2 (...) tolerated with no complications identified.This study suggests that CPAP compared with ST improves ventilation in children with bronchiolitis and hypercapnoea.

2008 EvidenceUpdates

109. WITHDRAWN: Glucocorticoids for acute viral bronchiolitis in infants and young children. (PubMed)

WITHDRAWN: Glucocorticoids for acute viral bronchiolitis in infants and young children. Systemic glucocorticoids have been widely prescribed for use in infants and young children with acute viral bronchiolitis but the actual benefit of this intervention requires clarification.To systematically review the evidence on the effectiveness of systemic glucocorticoids for the treatment of infants and young children with acute viral bronchiolitis.Multiple strategies were incorporated to maximize (...) with acute viral bronchiolitis and treated with systemic (oral, intramuscular or intravenous) corticosteroids. Three reviewers independently selected potentially relevant articles. Four reviewers evaluated these studies, determined eligibility and assessed the methodological quality of each RCT.The primary outcome of interest was length of hospital stay (LOS). Secondary outcomes were: respiratory rate, haemoglobin oxygen saturation, and hospital admission and revisit rates. Data were extracted

2008 Cochrane

110. Dexamethasone and placebo did not differ for respiratory status change or hospital admission in infants with acute bronchiolitis

Dexamethasone and placebo did not differ for respiratory status change or hospital admission in infants with acute bronchiolitis Dexamethasone and placebo did not differ for respiratory status change or hospital admission in infants with acute bronchiolitis | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our (...) . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Dexamethasone and placebo did not differ for respiratory status change or hospital admission in infants with acute bronchiolitis

2008 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

111. Chest physiotherapy for acute bronchiolitis in paediatric patients between 0 and 24 months old. (PubMed)

Chest physiotherapy for acute bronchiolitis in paediatric patients between 0 and 24 months old. Acute bronchiolitis is the leading cause of medical emergencies during winter in children younger than two years of age. Chest physiotherapy is thought to assist infants in the clearance of secretions and to decrease ventilatory effort.To determine the efficacy and safety of chest physiotherapy in infants aged less than 24 months old with acute bronchiolitis.In June 2006 we updated the searches (...) . Secondary outcomes were length of hospital stay, duration of oxygen supplementation, and the use of bronchodilators and steroids.Three clinical trials met the inclusion criteria. All evaluated vibration and percussion techniques with children in postural drainage positions compared to no intervention. The study populations were hospitalised infants with a clinical diagnosis of acute bronchiolitis, although one study included only infants who required nasogastric tube feeding or intravenous fluids. None

2007 Cochrane

112. Antibiotics for bronchiolitis in children. (PubMed)

Antibiotics for bronchiolitis in children. Bronchiolitis is a serious, potentially life-threatening respiratory illness commonly affecting young babies. It is most often caused by Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV). The diagnosis is usually made on clinical grounds (especially tachypnoea and wheezing in a child less than two years of age). Antibiotics are not recommended for bronchiolitis unless there is concern about complications such as secondary bacterial pneumonia. Despite (...) ).Types of studies: single or double blind randomised controlled trials comparing antibiotics to placebo in the treatment of bronchiolitis.children under the age of two years diagnosed with bronchiolitis using clinical criteria (including respiratory distress preceded by coryzal symptoms with or without fever). Types of interventions: oral, intravenous, intramuscular or inhaled antibiotics versus placebo. Types of outcome measures: primary clinical outcomes: time for the resolution of symptoms/signs

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2007 Cochrane

113. A multicenter, randomized, controlled trial of dexamethasone for bronchiolitis. (PubMed)

A multicenter, randomized, controlled trial of dexamethasone for bronchiolitis. Bronchiolitis, the most common infection of the lower respiratory tract in infants, is a leading cause of hospitalization in childhood. Corticosteroids are commonly used to treat bronchiolitis, but evidence of their effectiveness is limited.We conducted a double-blind, randomized trial comparing a single dose of oral dexamethasone (1 mg per kilogram of body weight) with placebo in 600 children (age range, 2 to 12 (...) months) with a first episode of wheezing diagnosed in the emergency department as moderate-to-severe bronchiolitis (defined by a Respiratory Distress Assessment Instrument score > or =6). We enrolled patients at 20 emergency departments during the months of November through April over a 3-year period. The primary outcome was hospital admission after 4 hours of emergency department observation. The secondary outcome was the Respiratory Assessment Change Score (RACS). We also evaluated later outcomes

2007 NEJM

114. Efficacy of interventions for bronchiolitis in critically ill infants: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Efficacy of interventions for bronchiolitis in critically ill infants: A systematic review and meta-analysis PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

2007 PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club

115. Bronchiolitis. (PubMed)

Bronchiolitis. Bronchiolitis is a distressing, potentially life-threatening respiratory condition that affects young babies. Around 2-3% of all infants younger than 1 year are admitted to hospital with bronchiolitis, usually during the seasonal epidemic. The majority of these infants are infected with respiratory syncytial virus and all have an intense inflammatory response in their airways. Although most infants recover, they have an increased risk of recurrent wheezing. Although bronchiolitis (...) is common, little is known about what causes infants to be susceptible. Diagnostic interventions have little effect on clinical outcome, and apart from supportive measures, there is no specific treatment. Bronchiolitis therefore presents an intriguing clinical conundrum and a major challenge to researchers. High quality clinical studies are needed to clarify assessment of disease severity and criteria for hospital admission, particularly the use of pulse oximetry and chest radiography. Careful mapping

2006 Lancet

116. Bronchodilators for bronchiolitis. (PubMed)

Bronchodilators for bronchiolitis. Bronchiolitis is an acute, highly infectious lower respiratory tract infection. Bronchodilators are commonly used in the management of bronchiolitis in North America but not in the United Kingdom.The objective of this review was to assess the effects of bronchodilators on clinical outcomes in infants with acute bronchiolitis.In this updated review, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews (...) trials with 1428 infants with bronchiolitis were included in this review. In eight trials, with 468 infants, there was no improvement in clinical score for 43% of those treated with bronchodilators compared to 57% of those treated with placebo (odds ratio (OR) for no improvement 0.45, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.15 to 1.29). There was a statistically significant but clinically modest improvement in the overall average clinical score (standardized mean difference (SMD) -0.48, 95% CI -0.62 to -0.33

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2006 Cochrane

117. Surfactant therapy for bronchiolitis in critically ill infants. (PubMed)

Surfactant therapy for bronchiolitis in critically ill infants. Viral bronchiolitis is a common cause of respiratory failure in infants and children, and accounts for a significant portion of intensive care unit (ICU) admissions during seasonal epidemics. Currently there is no evidence to support the use of anything but supportive care for this disease. Surfactant is a potentially promising therapy; alterations in its composition have been described in bronchiolitis, and it may play a role (...) in the host immunity for this disease.The objective of this review was to assess the efficacy of exogenous surfactant for the treatment of bronchiolitis in mechanically ventilated infants and children.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 1, 2006); MEDLINE (1966 to Week 1, February 2006); and EMBASE (1990 to September 2005). We reviewed reference lists of relevant articles and contacted experts in the field.Randomised controlled trials (RCTs

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2006 Cochrane

118. Review: corticosteroids do not reduce hospital length of stay or respiratory distress in infantile acute viral bronchiolitis

Review: corticosteroids do not reduce hospital length of stay or respiratory distress in infantile acute viral bronchiolitis Review: corticosteroids do not reduce hospital length of stay or respiratory distress in infantile acute viral bronchiolitis | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log (...) in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Review: corticosteroids do not reduce hospital length of stay or respiratory distress in infantile acute viral bronchiolitis Article Text

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2006 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

119. Clinical Effects of Heliox Administration for Acute Bronchiolitis in Young Infants

Clinical Effects of Heliox Administration for Acute Bronchiolitis in Young Infants PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

2006 PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club

120. Review: commonly used pharmacological treatments for bronchiolitis in children do not seem to be effective

Review: commonly used pharmacological treatments for bronchiolitis in children do not seem to be effective Review: commonly used pharmacological treatments for bronchiolitis in children do not seem to be effective | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password (...) For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Review: commonly used pharmacological treatments for bronchiolitis in children do not seem to be effective Article Text Therapeutics Review: commonly used pharmacological

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2005 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)