Latest & greatest articles for bupropion

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Top results for bupropion

61. Economic model of sustained-release bupropion hydrochloride in health plan and work site smoking-cessation programs

Economic model of sustained-release bupropion hydrochloride in health plan and work site smoking-cessation programs Economic model of sustained-release bupropion hydrochloride in health plan and work site smoking-cessation programs Economic model of sustained-release bupropion hydrochloride in health plan and work site smoking-cessation programs Halpern M T, Khan Z M, Young T L, Battista C Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion (...) on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology The use of sustained-release (SR) bupropion hydrochloride in health plan and work site smoking-cessation programmes. Type of intervention Treatment. Economic study type Cost-effectiveness analysis. Study population The study population comprised a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 employees

2000 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

62. A controlled trial of sustained-release bupropion, a nicotine patch, or both for smoking cessation. (PubMed)

A controlled trial of sustained-release bupropion, a nicotine patch, or both for smoking cessation. Use of nicotine-replacement therapies and the antidepressant bupropion helps people stop smoking. We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled comparison of sustained-release bupropion (244 subjects), a nicotine patch (244 subjects), bupropion and a nicotine patch (245 subjects), and placebo (160 subjects) for smoking cessation. Smokers with clinical depression were excluded. Treatment (...) consisted of nine weeks of bupropion (150 mg a day for the first three days, and then 150 mg twice daily) or placebo, as well as eight weeks of nicotine-patch therapy (21 mg per day during weeks 2 through 7, 14 mg per day during week 8, and 7 mg per day during week 9) or placebo. The target day for quitting smoking was usually day 8.The abstinence rates at 12 months were 15.6 percent in the placebo group, as compared with 16.4 percent in the nicotine-patch group, 30.3 percent in the bupropion group (P

1999 NEJM

63. A comparison of sustained-release bupropion and placebo for smoking cessation. (PubMed)

A comparison of sustained-release bupropion and placebo for smoking cessation. Trials of antidepressant medications for smoking cessation have had mixed results. We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of a sustained-release form of bupropion for smoking cessation. We excluded smokers with current depression, but not those with a history of major depression. The 615 subjects were randomly assigned to receive placebo or bupropion at a dose of 100, 150, or 300 mg per day for seven (...) (a gain of 2.9 kg in the placebo group, 2.3 kg in 100-mg and 150-mg groups, and 1.5 kg in the 300-mg group; P= 0.02). No effects of treatment were observed on depression scores as measured serially by the Beck Depression Inventory. Thirty-seven subjects stopped treatment prematurely because of adverse events; the frequency was similar among all groups.A sustained-release form of bupropion was effective for smoking cessation and was accompanied by reduced weight gain and minimal side effects. Many

1997 NEJM