Latest & greatest articles for cardiac arrest

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Top results for cardiac arrest

181. Wearable cardioverter-defibrillator (WCD) therapy in primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac arrest in patients at risk

Wearable cardioverter-defibrillator (WCD) therapy in primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac arrest in patients at risk Wearable cardioverter-defibrillator (WCD) therapy in primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac arrest in patients at risk Wearable cardioverter-defibrillator (WCD) therapy in primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac arrest in patients at risk Ettinger S, Stanak M, Huić M, Hacek RT, Ercevic D, Grenkovic R, Wild C Record Status (...) This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Ettinger S, Stanak M, Huić M, Hacek RT, Ercevic D, Grenkovic R, Wild C. Wearable cardioverter-defibrillator (WCD) therapy in primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac arrest in patients at risk. Vienna: Ludwig Boltzmann Institut fuer Health Technology Assessment (LBIHTA). Decision Support Document. 2016 Authors

2016 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

182. Management of Cardiac Arrest due to Trauma

Management of Cardiac Arrest due to Trauma ANZCOR Guideline 11.10.1 April 2016 Page 1 of 11 ANZCOR Guideline 11.10.1 Management of Cardiac Arrest due to Trauma Summary To whom does this guideline apply? This guideline applies to adult and paediatric patients in cardiac arrest, or peri-arrest, due to physical trauma. Specific isolated traumatic mechanisms such as near-hanging and burns are not addressed. Who is the audience for this guideline? This guideline applies to first-aiders, prehospital (...) clinicians and hospital teams. Recommendations The Australian and New Zealand Committee on Resuscitation (ANZCOR) recommends: • Unless there are injuries obviously incompatible with life, attempted resuscitation of patients with cardiac arrest due to trauma is not futile and should be attempted. • The first priority in peri-arrest trauma patients is to stop any obvious bleeding. • Depending on the likely aetiology of the cardiac arrest, restoration of the circulating blood volume may have a higher

2016 Australian Resuscitation Council

183. Therapeutic Hypothermia after Cardiac Arrest

Therapeutic Hypothermia after Cardiac Arrest ANZCOR Guideline 11.8 January 2016 Page 1 of 8 ANZCOR Guideline 11.8 – Targeted Temperature Management (TTM) after Cardiac Arrest Summary This guideline provides advice on targeted temperature management (TTM) during the post- arrest period which is a therapy associated with improved outcomes. Who does this guideline apply to? This guideline applies to adults who require advanced life support after cardiac arrest Who is the audience (...) for this guideline? This guideline is for health professionals and those who provide healthcare in environments where equipment and drugs are available. Recommendations The Australian and New Zealand Committee on Resuscitation (ANZCOR) make the following recommendations: 1. ANZCOR recommends TTM as opposed to no TTM for adults with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with an initial shockable rhythm who remain unresponsive after ROSC. 2. ANZCOR suggests TTM as opposed to no TTM for adults with OHCA

2016 Australian Resuscitation Council

184. Wearable cardioverter-defibrillator (WCD) therapy in primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac arrest in patients at risk

Wearable cardioverter-defibrillator (WCD) therapy in primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac arrest in patients at risk Dec2015 © EUnetHTA, 2015. Reproduction is authorised provided EUnetHTA is explicitly acknowledged 1 EUnetHTA WP4 Joint Action 3 Rapid assessment of other technologies using the HTA Core Model ® for Rapid Relative Effectiveness Assessment WEARABLE CARDIOVERTER-DEFIBRILLATOR (WCD) THERAPY IN PRIMARY AND SECONDARY PREVENTION OF SUDDEN CARDIAC ARREST IN PATIENTS AT RISK (...) Heart Association ORG Organisational aspects domain PM Pacemaker PMDA Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency PPCM Peripartum Cardiomyopathy pre-op pre-operation pt(s) patient(s) PVC Premature Ventricular Complex QoL Quality of Life REA Relative Effectiveness Assessment RCT Randomised Controlled Trials RVOT Right Ventricular Outflow Tract SA-ECG Signal-Averaged ECG SAE Serious Adverse Events SAF Safety domain SCA Sudden Cardiac Arrest SCD Sudden Cardiac Death SD Standard Deviation SPECT Single

2016 EUnetHTA

185. Warning Symptoms Are Associated With Survival From Sudden Cardiac Arrest. (PubMed)

Warning Symptoms Are Associated With Survival From Sudden Cardiac Arrest. Survival after sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) remains low, and tools for improved prediction of patients at long-term risk for SCA are lacking. Alternative short-term approaches aimed at preemptive risk stratification and prevention are needed.To assess characteristics of symptoms in the 4 weeks before SCA and whether response to these symptoms is associated with better outcomes.Ongoing prospective population-based

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2015 Annals of Internal Medicine

186. Continuous or Interrupted Chest Compressions for Cardiac Arrest. (PubMed)

Continuous or Interrupted Chest Compressions for Cardiac Arrest. 26552007 2015 12 23 2018 12 02 1533-4406 373 23 2015 Dec 03 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Continuous or Interrupted Chest Compressions for Cardiac Arrest. 2278-9 10.1056/NEJMe1513415 Koster Rudolph W RW From the Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam. eng Editorial Comment 2015 11 09 United States N Engl J Med 0255562 0028-4793 AIM IM N Engl J Med. 2015 Dec 3;373(23):2203-14 26550795 (...) Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation methods Emergency Medical Services Female Humans Male Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest therapy Positive-Pressure Respiration 2015 11 10 6 0 2015 11 10 6 0 2015 12 24 6 0 ppublish 26552007 10.1056/NEJMe1513415

2015 NEJM

187. The CAHP (Cardiac Arrest Hospital Prognosis) score: a tool for risk stratification after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (PubMed)

The CAHP (Cardiac Arrest Hospital Prognosis) score: a tool for risk stratification after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains disappointingly low. Among patients admitted alive, early prognostication remains challenging. This study aims to establish a stratification score for patients admitted in intensive care unit (ICU) after OHCA, according to their neurological outcome.The CAHP (Cardiac Arrest Hospital Prognosis) score was developed (...) from the Sudden Death Expertise Center registry (Paris, France). The primary outcome was poor neurological outcome defined as Cerebral Performance Category 3, 4, or 5 at hospital discharge. Independent prognostic factors were identified using logistic regression analysis and thresholds defined to stratify low-, moderate-, and high-risk groups. The CAHP score was validated in both a prospective and an external data set (Parisian Cardiac Arrest Registry). The developmental data set included 819

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2015 EvidenceUpdates

188. [Pre-hospital ECMO for refractory cardiac arrest]

[Pre-hospital ECMO for refractory cardiac arrest] ECMO pour la prise en charge pré-hospitalière de l'arrêt cardiaque [Pre-hospital ECMO for refractory cardiac arrest] ECMO pour la prise en charge pré-hospitalière de l'arrêt cardiaque [Pre-hospital ECMO for refractory cardiac arrest] Comite d´Evaluation et de Diffusion des Innovations Technologiques (CEDIT) Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation (...) of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Comite d´Evaluation et de Diffusion des Innovations Technologiques (CEDIT). ECMO pour la prise en charge pré-hospitalière de l'arrêt cardiaque. [Pre-hospital ECMO for refractory cardiac arrest] Paris, France: Comite d´Evaluation et de Diffusion des Innovations Technologiques (CEDIT). 2015 Authors' objectives The CEDIT (hospital based HTA agency) of AP-HP (Paris University Hospital) assessed the impact and value of extracorporeal

2015 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

189. Outcomes following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: What is the potential for donation after circulatory death? (PubMed)

Outcomes following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: What is the potential for donation after circulatory death? We conducted a prospective observational study on 100 consecutive patients admitted to intensive care units at Leeds General Infirmary following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. In the non-survivors, we reviewed their potential for organ donation via donation after circulatory death. Out of the 100 patients, 53 did not survive to hospital discharge. Out of these non-survivors, 13 died (...) very suddenly within the intensive care unit and 3 other patients subsequently died in a general ward following discharge from the intensive care unit. One patient became brainstem dead, with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest secondary to a subarachnoid haemorrhage, rather than a primary cardiac cause. This patient went on to donate via the brain death mode. The remaining 36 patients had treatment withdrawn in the intensive care unit. Of these, 29 were referred to the transplant team for potential

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2015 Journal of the Intensive Care Society

190. Aminophylline for bradyasystolic cardiac arrest in adults. (PubMed)

Aminophylline for bradyasystolic cardiac arrest in adults. In cardiac ischaemia, the accumulation of adenosine may lead to or exacerbate bradyasystole and diminish the effectiveness of catecholamines administered during resuscitation. Aminophylline is a competitive adenosine antagonist. Case studies suggest that aminophylline may be effective for atropine-resistant bradyasystolic arrest.To determine the effects of aminophylline in the treatment of patients in bradyasystolic cardiac arrest (...) Google.All randomised controlled trials comparing intravenous aminophylline with administered placebo in adults with non-traumatic, normothermic bradyasystolic cardiac arrest who were treated with standard advanced cardiac life support (ACLS).Two review authors independently reviewed the studies and extracted the included data. We contacted study authors when needed. Pooled risk ratio (RR) was estimated for each study outcome. Subgroup analysis was predefined according to the timing of aminophylline

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2015 Cochrane

191. A good outcome after absence of bilateral N20 SSEPs post-cardiac arrest (PubMed)

A good outcome after absence of bilateral N20 SSEPs post-cardiac arrest A 51-year-old man suffered a cardiac arrest after an attempted hanging. Post-arrest assessment revealed the bilateral absence of negative 20 somatosensory evoked potentials (N20 SSEPs) which is suggestive of a poor neurological outcome. Current evidence recommends its use in prognostication. Our patient made a good recovery which brings into question the value of negative 20 somatosensory evoked potentials

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2015 Journal of the Intensive Care Society

192. Management of cardiac arrest survivors in UK intensive care units: a survey of practice (PubMed)

Management of cardiac arrest survivors in UK intensive care units: a survey of practice Cardiac arrest is a common presentation to intensive care units. There is evidence that management protocols between hospitals differ and that this variation is mirrored in patient outcomes between institutions, with standardised treatment protocols improving outcomes within individual units. It has been postulated that regionalisation of services may improve outcomes as has been shown in trauma, burns (...) and stroke patients, however a national protocol has not been a focus for research. The objective of our study was to ascertain current management strategies for comatose post cardiac arrest survivors in intensive care in the United Kingdom.A telephone survey was carried out to establish the management of comatose post cardiac arrest survivors in UK intensive care units. All 235 UK intensive care units were contacted and 208 responses (89%) were received.A treatment protocol is used in 172 units (82.7

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2015 Journal of the Intensive Care Society

193. The use of therapeutic magnesium for neuroprotection during global cerebral ischemia associated with cardiac arrest and cardiac bypass surgery in adults: a systematic review protocol. (PubMed)

The use of therapeutic magnesium for neuroprotection during global cerebral ischemia associated with cardiac arrest and cardiac bypass surgery in adults: a systematic review protocol. 26447069 2016 04 22 2018 12 02 2202-4433 13 4 2015 May 15 JBI database of systematic reviews and implementation reports JBI Database System Rev Implement Rep The use of therapeutic magnesium for neuroprotection during global cerebral ischemia associated with cardiac arrest and cardiac bypass surgery in adults (...) Adult Brain Ischemia drug therapy etiology Cerebral Infarction complications Heart Arrest complications drug therapy Humans Magnesium therapeutic use Neuroprotection drug effects Systematic Reviews as Topic Magnesium cardiac arrest neuroprotection 2014 04 11 2015 02 17 2015 02 15 2015 10 9 6 0 2015 10 9 6 0 2016 4 23 6 0 epublish 26447069 10.11124/jbisrir-2015-1675

2015 JBI database of systematic reviews and implementation reports

194. Alignment of Do-Not-Resuscitate Status With Patients' Likelihood of Favorable Neurological Survival After In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest. (PubMed)

Alignment of Do-Not-Resuscitate Status With Patients' Likelihood of Favorable Neurological Survival After In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest. After patients survive an in-hospital cardiac arrest, discussions should occur about prognosis and preferences for future resuscitative efforts.To assess whether patients' decisions for do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders after a successful resuscitation from in-hospital cardiac arrest are aligned with their expected prognosis.Within Get With The Guidelines (...) -Resuscitation, we identified 26,327 patients with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after in-hospital cardiac arrest between April 2006 and September 2012 at 406 US hospitals. Using a previously validated prognostic tool, each patient's likelihood of favorable neurological survival (ie, without severe neurological disability) was calculated. The proportion of patients with DNR orders within each prognosis score decile and the association between DNR status and actual favorable neurological survival

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2015 JAMA

195. Interdisciplinary ICU cardiac arrest debriefing improves survival outcomes

Interdisciplinary ICU cardiac arrest debriefing improves survival outcomes PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

2015 PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club

196. Association of presence and timing of invasive airway placement with outcomes after pediatric in-hospital cardiac arrest

Association of presence and timing of invasive airway placement with outcomes after pediatric in-hospital cardiac arrest PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

2015 PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club

197. Association of Bystander Interventions With Neurologically Intact Survival Among Patients With Bystander-Witnessed Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Japan. (PubMed)

Association of Bystander Interventions With Neurologically Intact Survival Among Patients With Bystander-Witnessed Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Japan. Neurologically intact survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has been increasing in Japan. However, associations between increased prehospital care, including bystander interventions and increases in survival, have not been well estimated.To estimate the associations between bystander interventions and changes in neurologically (...) intact survival among patients with OHCA in Japan.Retrospective descriptive study using data from Japan's nationwide OHCA registry, which started in January 2005. The registry includes all patients with OHCA transported to the hospital by emergency medical services (EMS) and recorded patients' characteristics, prehospital interventions, and outcomes. Participants were 167,912 patients with bystander-witnessed OHCA of presumed cardiac origin in the registry between January 2005 and December 2012

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2015 JAMA

198. Association of Bystander and First-Responder Intervention With Survival After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in North Carolina, 2010-2013. (PubMed)

Association of Bystander and First-Responder Intervention With Survival After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in North Carolina, 2010-2013. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is associated with low survival, but early cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation can improve outcomes if more widely adopted.To examine temporal changes in bystander and first-responder resuscitation efforts before arrival of the emergency medical services (EMS) following statewide initiatives to improve (...) bystander and first-responder efforts in North Carolina from 2010-2013 and to examine the association between bystander and first-responder resuscitation efforts and survival and neurological outcome.We studied 4961 patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest for whom resuscitation was attempted and who were identified through the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (2010-2013). First responders were dispatched police officers, firefighters, rescue squad, or life-saving crew trained to perform

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2015 JAMA

199. Targeted Temperature Management at 33°C versus 36°C after Cardiac Arrest

Targeted Temperature Management at 33°C versus 36°C after Cardiac Arrest PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

2015 PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club

200. Therapeutic Hypothermia after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Children

Therapeutic Hypothermia after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Children PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

2015 PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club