Latest & greatest articles for caries

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Top results for caries

161. Use of ultrasound testing for interproximal caries causes increased false positive results compared with bite wing radiography

Use of ultrasound testing for interproximal caries causes increased false positive results compared with bite wing radiography UTCAT2546, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Use of Ultrasound Testing for Interproximal Caries Causes Increased False Positive Results Compared With Bite Wing Radiography Clinical Question In detecting if caries is present on contacting proximal surfaces, are ultrasound caries (...) detectors statistically better than bite wing radiography? Clinical Bottom Line Ultrasound caries detection cannot replace bite wing radiography but can be a beneficial diagnostic tool. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Tagtekin/2008 42 white/brown lesions on extracted teeth Laboratory blind comparison to gold standard Key results Reported sensitivity and specificity of 86% and 84

2013 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

162. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) may offer a great non-invasive method for early caries detection.

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) may offer a great non-invasive method for early caries detection. UTCAT2536, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) May Offer a Great Non-Invasive Method for Early Caries Detection Clinical Question In a patient with developing decay, would Optical coherence tomography offer an early detection tool compared to traditional methods? Clinical (...) Bottom Line In literature published over the past 5 years, Optical Coherence Tomography showed promising results in early caries detection both in vivo and in vitro when compared to radiography and histology samples respectively. Further studies are required for clinical confirmation of the results and implementation methods in the clinical environment. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1

2013 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

163. In a patient with occlusal caries, a laser fluorescent device can be used as an adjunct to radiographic imaging to detect dentin decay.

In a patient with occlusal caries, a laser fluorescent device can be used as an adjunct to radiographic imaging to detect dentin decay. UTCAT2529, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title In a patient with occlusal caries, a laser fluorescent device can be used as an adjunct to radiographic imaging to detect dentin decay. Clinical Question In a patient with occlusal caries, is a laser fluorescent device (...) as accurate as radiographic imaging at detecting dentin decay? Clinical Bottom Line A laser fluorescent device is able to detect dentin caries better than radiographs because its sensitivity is better than radiographs. Laser fluorescence device is good adjunct to detect occlusal caries. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Lussi/2001 240 patients; 332 occlusal surfaces evaluated Controlled Clinical

2013 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

164. Preventing Dental Caries in Children <5 Years: Systematic Review Updating USPSTF Recommendation (Full text)

Preventing Dental Caries in Children <5 Years: Systematic Review Updating USPSTF Recommendation Screening and preventive interventions by primary care providers could improve outcomes related to early childhood caries. The objective of this study was to update the 2004 US Preventive Services Task Force systematic review on prevention of caries in children younger than 5 years of age.Searching Medline and the Cochrane Library (through March 2013) and reference lists, we included trials (...) fluoride supplementation. Three new randomized trials were consistent with previous studies in finding fluoride varnish more effective than no varnish (reduction in caries increment 18% to 59%). Three trials of xylitol were inconclusive regarding effects on caries. New observational studies were consistent with previous evidence showing an association between early childhood fluoride use and enamel fluorosis. Evidence on the accuracy of risk prediction instruments in primary care settings

2013 EvidenceUpdates PubMed

165. Fluoride varnishes for preventing dental caries in children and adolescents. (Full text)

Fluoride varnishes for preventing dental caries in children and adolescents. Topically-applied fluoride varnishes have been used extensively as an operator-applied caries-preventive intervention for over three decades. This review updates the first Cochrane review of fluoride varnishes for preventing dental caries in children and adolescents, which was first published in 2002.To determine the effectiveness and safety of fluoride varnishes in preventing dental caries in children and adolescents (...) Conference Proceedings (1945 to 13 May 2013). A search for ongoing trials was undertaken on ClinicalTrials.gov on 13 May 2013. There were no restrictions on language or date of publication in the search of the electronic databases.Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials with blind outcome assessment used or indicated, comparing topically-applied fluoride varnish with placebo or no treatment in children up to 16 years during at least one year. The main outcome was caries increment measured

2013 Cochrane PubMed

166. Fluoride varnish was effective at reducing caries on high caries risk school children in rural Brazil. (Full text)

Fluoride varnish was effective at reducing caries on high caries risk school children in rural Brazil. Placebo controlled randomised controlled trial (RCT).Recruited children were randomly assigned to either a treatment (5% NaF varnish, n = 198) or a control group (placebo, n = 181). Data on oral health habits and socio-demographic characteristics was collected from the children by trained interviewers. Diet information was collected using a seven day food frequency diary. Caries was assessed (...) using the International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS).The main outcome was decayed and filled surfaces (DFS) increment at 12 months.Two hundred and ten (55.4%) children having one or two applications of fluoride varnish or placebo were available for follow-up at 12 months. At the baseline examination, the children in the treatment and control groups presented with on average 6.2 and 5.6 DFS, respectively (P < 0.001). At 12 months, the children in the varnish group showed

2013 Evidence-based dentistry PubMed

167. Receiving a Fluoride Varnish Semiannually Reduces Caries Incidence in Children

Receiving a Fluoride Varnish Semiannually Reduces Caries Incidence in Children UTCAT2507, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Receiving a Fluoride Varnish Semiannually Reduces Caries Incidence in Children Clinical Question In children, does receiving a fluoride varnish twice a year compared to once a year have an effect on carries development? Clinical Bottom Line Semiannual administration of fluoride (...) varnishes to children is more effective at reducing caries incidence than annual administration of fluoride varnishes. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Arruda/2012 Sample size was 379 children of ages 7-14 years. The population lived in rural Brazil. Randomized Controlled Trial Key results Children who received fluoride varnish twice a year had a 49% (95% CI: 31.7-66.3%) decrease in caries

2013 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

168. UPDATED: Caris Target Now? molecular profiling service for solid malignant tumours

UPDATED: Caris Target Now? molecular profiling service for solid malignant tumours UPDATED: Caris Target Now™ molecular profiling service for solid malignant tumours UPDATED: Caris Target Now™ molecular profiling service for solid malignant tumours NIHR HSC Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation NIHR HSC. UPDATED: Caris Target

2013 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

169. Individuals suffering from diabetes are more susceptible to root caries but not coronal caries compared to those without diabetes

Individuals suffering from diabetes are more susceptible to root caries but not coronal caries compared to those without diabetes UTCAT2483, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Individuals Suffering From Diabetes Are More Susceptible to Root Caries But Not Coronal Caries Compared to Those Without Diabetes Clinical Question Are individuals suffering from diabetes more susceptible to dental caries than those (...) without diabetes? Clinical Bottom Line Individuals suffering from diabetes are not more susceptible to coronal caries compared with non-diabetic individuals. However, it is possible for diabetic individuals to be more susceptible to root caries compared to non-diabetic individuals. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Hintao/2007 105 Type II diabetic subjects and 103 non-diabetic subjects

2013 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

170. Dental Caries Is Associated With Both High And Low Body Mass Index

Dental Caries Is Associated With Both High And Low Body Mass Index UTCAT2365, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Dental Caries Is Associated With Both High And Low Body Mass Index Clinical Question Are obese individuals more susceptible to dental caries than non-obese individuals? Clinical Bottom Line There is a non-linear association between BMI and dental caries. Individuals with either high or low Body (...) Mass Index (BMI) are susceptible to dental caries. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Hooley/2012 48 studies from 2004-2011 age 0-18 years Systematic Review Key results 48% of the studies reviewed found no association between BMI and dental caries; 35% showed positive association; and 19% showed inverse association. There is a non-linear relationship between BMI and dental caries

2013 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

171. Tobacco Users Are Not More Susceptible To Dental Caries Than Non-Users

Tobacco Users Are Not More Susceptible To Dental Caries Than Non-Users UTCAT2369, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Tobacco Users Are Not More Susceptible To Dental Caries Than Non-Users Clinical Question Among healthy individuals, are tobacco users more susceptible to dental caries than non-users? Clinical Bottom Line Two randomized Controlled Trials (RCT) and one study of three cross-sectional studies (...) indicate that tobacco users are not more susceptible to dental caries than non-users. Nagarajappa (2010) RCT study indicated 61.9% of users were affected by caries compared to 90.5% of non-users. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Hugoson/2012 Smokers (345), smokeless tobacco users (104) and non-tobacco users (1142) Cross-sectional studies (3) Key results Three cross sectional studies were

2013 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

172. Increased Risk Of Dental Caries In Children That Consume A Diet High In Fermentable Carbohydrates

Increased Risk Of Dental Caries In Children That Consume A Diet High In Fermentable Carbohydrates UTCAT2391, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Increased Risk Of Dental Caries In Children That Consume A Diet High In Fermentable Carbohydrates Clinical Question Does the risk of dental caries increase in children that consume a diet high in fermentable carbohydrates compared to children that do not consume (...) a diet high in fermentable carbohydrates? Clinical Bottom Line Children that eat a diet high in fermentable carbohydrates have a significant increase in their dental caries risk compared to children that do not have a diet high in fermentable carbohydrates. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Huew/2012 Children 12 years of age Survey Key results In this study, the authors examined

2013 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

173. Efficacy of Chlorhexidine Varnish In Treating Root Caries Of Geriatric Patients

Efficacy of Chlorhexidine Varnish In Treating Root Caries Of Geriatric Patients UTCAT2411, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Efficacy of Chlorhexidine Varnish In Treating Root Caries of Geriatric Patients Clinical Question Will the application of a chlorhexidine varnish prevent or reduce the progression of root caries in a geriatric population versus a placebo group? Clinical Bottom Line Chlorhexidine (...) varnish can aid in the reduction of the occurrence and progression of root caries in geriatric patients. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Banting/2000 236 Subjects Randomized control Trial Key results Treatment with 10% chlohexidine varnish demonstrated a significant reduction in root caries (p=0.02) and total caries (p=0.03) versus the placebo groups. The chlorhexidine varnish treatment

2013 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

174. There Is No Direct Link Between Asthma and Dental Caries but Associated Secondary Factors May Increase Caries Incidence

There Is No Direct Link Between Asthma and Dental Caries but Associated Secondary Factors May Increase Caries Incidence UTCAT2455, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title There Is No Direct Link Between Asthma and Dental Caries but Associated Secondary Factors May Increase Caries Incidence Clinical Question Are adolescents and children with asthma more susceptible to dental caries? Clinical Bottom Line Evidence (...) for a definitive association between asthma and dental caries appears to be inconclusive. However, secondary factors of the disease could put both adolescents and children at greater risk of dental caries. Dentists should individually assess each asthmatic patient to determine increased caries risk. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Alavaikko/2011 11 studies on primary dentition 14 studies

2013 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

175. Amalgam Versus Resin Composite Restorative Materials to Prevent Secondary Caries Via Antibacterial Properties

Amalgam Versus Resin Composite Restorative Materials to Prevent Secondary Caries Via Antibacterial Properties UTCAT2456, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Amalgam Versus Resin Composite Restorative Materials to Prevent Secondary Caries Via Antibacterial Properties Clinical Question In a patient with high caries risk, are dental amalgams or resin composites more effective as antibacterial agents (...) in preventing secondary caries? Clinical Bottom Line In vitro amalgam certainly showed more antibacterial potential than composite material, but for a high caries risk patient it is not clear whether the amalgam positive benefits of this study will translate into the same results in the oral cavity of patients as opposed to composite. Thus good technique and preparation formation should be considered first priority when considering the formation of secondary caries. Best Evidence (you may view more info

2013 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

176. Salivary Bacteria Levels Of Lactobacillus and Streptococcus Mutans Is Not A Reliable Indicator Of Caries Risk Of An Individual Patient (Full text)

Salivary Bacteria Levels Of Lactobacillus and Streptococcus Mutans Is Not A Reliable Indicator Of Caries Risk Of An Individual Patient UTCAT2367, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Salivary Bacteria Levels Of Lactobacillus and Streptococcus Mutans Is Not A Reliable Indicator Of Caries Risk Of An Individual Patient Clinical Question Is salivary bacteria level a reliable predictor of caries activity (...) or caries risk? Clinical Bottom Line Salivary bacteria levels (Lactobacillus and Streptococcus mutans) cannot reliably be used to predict the caries activities or caries risk in all groups of people. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Van Houte/1993 At-risk children and adults Review (diagnostic) Key results This is a review of studies that investigated the best factor or combination of factors

2013 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library PubMed

177. KHA-CARI Guideline: Use of iron in chronic kidney disease patients

KHA-CARI Guideline: Use of iron in chronic kidney disease patients Original Article KHA-CARI Guideline: Use of iron in chronic kidney disease patients ROB MACGINLEY, 1 ROWAN WALKER 2 and MICHELLE IRVING 3 1 Deakin University Medical School, Geelong, 2 Department of Renal Medicine, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, and 3 Centre for Kidney Research, The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Correspondence: Dr Rob MacGinley, Deakin University Medical School (...) –34. 5. Stancu S, Bârsan L, Stanciu A et al. Can the response to iron therapy be predicted in anemic nondialysis patients with chronic kidney disease? Clin. J. Am. Soc. Nephrol. 2010; 5: 409–16. 6. Albaramki J, Hodson EM, Craig JC et al. Parenteral versus oral iron therapy for adults and children with chronic kidney disease. Cochrane Database Syst. Rev. 2012; (1): Cd007857. *Explanation of grades The evidence and recommendations in this KHA-CARI guideline have been evaluated and graded following

2013 KHA-CARI Guidelines

178. KHA-CARI commentary on International treatment guidelines for anaemia in chronic kidney disease

KHA-CARI commentary on International treatment guidelines for anaemia in chronic kidney disease Editorials MJA 199 (2) · 22 July 2013 84 The Medical Journal of Australia ISSN: 0025- 729X 22 July 2013 199 2 84-85 ©The Medical Journal of Australia 2013 www.mja.com.au Editorial ne in nine Australians has chronic kidney dis- ease (CKD), 1 although the condition may often not be recognised in primary care. 2 There are five stages of CKD, ranging from Stage 1, in which patients have normal renal (...) It is noteworthy that the conclusions, recommendations and ungraded suggestions for clinical practice in the KDIGO guideline are largely consistent with those currently provided in the Kidney Health Australia–Caring for Australasians with Renal Impairment (KHA-CARI) guidelines. 6,7 Of particular note, the KDIGO guideline takes into account the importance of balancing the risks and benefits of erythropoietin-stimulating agents (ESAs) and iron therapy. A key aspect of the KDIGO guideline is that it recommends

2013 KHA-CARI Guidelines

179. KHA-CARI Guideline: Early chronic kidney disease: Detection, prevention and management

KHA-CARI Guideline: Early chronic kidney disease: Detection, prevention and management Original Article KHA-CARI Guideline: Early chronic kidney disease: Detection, prevention and management DAVID W JOHNSON, 1 EMELIA ATAI, 3 MARIA CHAN, 4 RICHARD KS PHOON, 3 CLODAGH SCOTT, 2 NIGEL D TOUSSAINT, 7 GRAEME L TURNER, 6 TIM USHERWOOD 5 and KATHRYN J WIGGINS 7 1 Department of Nephrology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, 2 Australian Practice Nurses Association, The Family Practice, Bundaberg (...) D levels monitored regu- larly (1C). CONFLICT OF INTEREST Emelia Atai, Graeme Turner, Kate Wiggins, Maria Chan, Tim Usherwood, Clodagh Scott and Nigel Toussaint have no rel- evant ?nancial af?liations that would cause a con?ict of interest according to the con?ict of interest statement set down by KHA-CARI. Richard Phoon has a level II b. con?ict of interest for receivingspeakerfeesandhonorariafromseveralcompanies related to anaemia, CKD-MBD and cardiovascular disease between 2008 and 2010

2013 KHA-CARI Guidelines

180. KHA-CARI commentary on the KDIGO Clinical Practice Guideline for Glomerulonephritis

KHA-CARI commentary on the KDIGO Clinical Practice Guideline for Glomerulonephritis Editorial Commentary on the KDIGO Clinical Practice Guideline for Glomerulonephritis Not so long ago, a paper published in Kidney International explored the reasons for the paucity of high-quality clinical trials in glomerulonephritis (GN). 1 The authors identi?ed several factors, including the low prevalence of disease, vari- ability in clinical presentation, variability in treatment responses, lack

2013 KHA-CARI Guidelines