Latest & greatest articles for children

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Top results for children

1. Health Care Support Workers Administering Inactivated Influenza, Shingles and Pneumococcal Vaccines for Adults and Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine (LAIV) for Children

Health Care Support Workers Administering Inactivated Influenza, Shingles and Pneumococcal Vaccines for Adults and Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine (LAIV) for Children CLINICAL PROFESSIONAL RESOURCE Health Care Support Workers Administering Inactivated Influenza, Shingles and Pneumococcal Vaccines for Adults and Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine (LAIV) for Children RCN guidance Version 3 revised 2019 This RCN document applies in England and Wales in line with the National Minimum Standards (...) (PHE 2015). These standards are not endorsed in Northern Ireland or Scotland although it is acknowledged that the principles may still provide useful guidance. This version replaces all previous RCN guidance to support HCSW and vaccination. HEALTH CARE SUPPORT WORKERS ADMINISTERING VACCINES FOR ADULTS AND CHILDREN 2 Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank those individuals, groups and organisations that have contributed to this Royal College of Nursing publication, particularly the support

2019 Royal College of Nursing

2. Fluticasone/formoterol (Flutiform) - the regular treatment of asthma in children aged 5 to 12 years

Fluticasone/formoterol (Flutiform) - the regular treatment of asthma in children aged 5 to 12 years 1 Published 10 June 2019 1 Product update SMC2178 fluticasone propionate/formoterol fumarate metered dose inhaler 50 microgram/5 microgram (flutiform®) Napp Pharmaceuticals Ltd 10 May 2019 The Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC) has completed its assessment of the above product and advises NHS Boards and Area Drug and Therapeutic Committees (ADTCs) on its use in NHSScotland. The advice (...) is summarised as follows: ADVICE: following an abbreviated submission fluticasone propionate/formoterol fumarate (flutiform®) is accepted for use within NHSScotland. Indication under review: the regular treatment of asthma in children aged 5 to 12 years where the use of a combination product (an inhaled corticosteroid and a long-acting ß 2 agonist) is appropriate: • For patients not adequately controlled with inhaled corticosteroids and 'as required' inhaled short-acting ß 2 agonist. Or • For patients

2019 Scottish Medicines Consortium

3. Do Glucocorticoids Improve Symptoms and Reduce Return Visits or Admission Rates Among Children With Croup?

Do Glucocorticoids Improve Symptoms and Reduce Return Visits or Admission Rates Among Children With Croup? Do Glucocorticoids Improve Symptoms and Reduce Return Visits or Admission Rates Among Children With Croup? - Annals of Emergency Medicine Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Share this page Access provided by Volume 73, Issue 5, Pages 459–461 Do Glucocorticoids Improve Symptoms and Reduce Return Visits or Admission Rates Among Children With Croup? x (...) Michael D. April , MD, DPhil (EBEM Commentator) , x Brit Long , MD (EBEM Commentator) Department of Emergency Medicine, San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, San Antonio, TX DOI: | Publication History Published online: December 07, 2018 Expand all Collapse all Article Outline Take-Home Message Compared with placebo, glucocorticoids improve symptoms of croup at 2 through 24 hours and reduce rates of return visits and admissions among children with croup. Methods Data Sources

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2019 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

4. Treatment of Depression in Children: A Systematic Review

Treatment of Depression in Children: A Systematic Review Draft Comparative Effectiveness Review Number XX Treatment of Depression in Children: A Systematic Review Prepared for: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 5600 Fishers Lane Rockville, MD 20857 www.ahrq.gov This information is distributed solely for the purposes of predissemination peer review. It has not been formally disseminated by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ (...) with mixed depression diagnoses, CBT and family therapy may improve symptoms, response, or functional status. • For adolescents and children with MDD, CBT plus medications may help prevent relapse. • Evidence on children with MDD or mixed depression diagnoses is sparse. • We found insufficient evidence to judge harms associated with nonpharmacological interventions. For pharmacological interventions, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) as a class may improve response and functional status

2019 Effective Health Care Program (AHRQ)

5. Growth Monitoring for Children with Chronic Kidney Disease

Growth Monitoring for Children with Chronic Kidney Disease S Trace, E Cameron, C Inward, CP Burren, Feb 2019 Review date Feb 2022 Page 1 of 5 Bristol Royal Hospital for Children Growth Monitoring Guideline for Children with CKD Contents Page 1-2 Scope, Background, Rationale and Evidence base for guideline Page 2 Definition of Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) Page 3 Notes on Growth Monitoring and Referral Page 4 Growth Monitoring Timetable Page 5 References The guideline scope extends (...) to both specialist renal units and shared care centres, including those where children are seen by non-specialist paediatricians. This guideline provides guidance on the monitoring of growth in children and young people with CKD. Where this monitoring indicates growth concerns, clinicians should manage and refer cases according to their local or regional paediatric endocrine referral pathways. Background: Growth retardation is well documented in children with CKD 1,2,3,4 , even in children with mild

2019 British Society for Paediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes

6. Can S100B Serum Biomarker Testing Reduce Head Computed Tomography Scanning in Children With Mild Traumatic Brain Injury?

Can S100B Serum Biomarker Testing Reduce Head Computed Tomography Scanning in Children With Mild Traumatic Brain Injury? Can S100B Serum Biomarker Testing Reduce Head Computed Tomography Scanning in Children With Mild Traumatic Brain Injury? - Annals of Emergency Medicine Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Share this page Access provided by Volume 73, Issue 5, Pages 456–458 Can S100B Serum Biomarker Testing Reduce Head Computed Tomography Scanning (...) in Children With Mild Traumatic Brain Injury? x Steven K. Roumpf , MD (EBEM Commentator) IU Health Academic Health Center, Department of Emergency Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN x Julie L. Welch , MD (EBEM Commentator) Indiana Clinical and Translational Science Institute, Department of Emergency Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN DOI: | Publication History Published online: November 20, 2018 Expand all Collapse all Article Outline Take-Home

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2019 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

7. Emergency management of adrenal insufficiency in children: advocating for treatment options in outpatient and field settings

Emergency management of adrenal insufficiency in children: advocating for treatment options in outpatient and field settings Miller BS, et al. J Investig Med 2019;0:1–10. doi:10.1136/jim-2019-000999 1 Review Emergency management of adrenal insufficiency in children: advocating for treatment options in outpatient and field settings Bradley S Miller, 1 Sandra P Spencer, 2 Mitchell E Geffner, 3 Evgenia Gourgari, 4 Amit Lahoti, 5 Manmohan K Kamboj, 2 Takara L Stanley, 6 Naveen K Uli, 7 Brandy (...) A Wicklow, 8 Kyriakie Sarafoglou 1 To cite: Miller BS, Spencer SP , Geffner ME, et al. J Investig Med Epub ahead of print: [please include Day Month Year]. doi:10.1136/jim-2019- 000999 For numbered affiliations see end of article. Correspondence to Dr Bradley S Miller, Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota Masonic Children’s Hospital, 2450 Riverside Ave, Minneapolis, MN 55454, USA; mille685@ umn. edu The work has been presented at Pediatric Academic Society Meeting 2018, ’Year In Review

2019 Pediatric Endocrine Society

8. Digital media: Promoting healthy screen use in school-aged children and adolescents

Digital media: Promoting healthy screen use in school-aged children and adolescents Digital media are integrated into the everyday lives of children and adolescents, with potential benefits and risks for learning, mental and physical health, and for social life. This statement examines the cognitive, psychosocial, and physical effects of digital media on school-aged children and adolescents, with a focus on family routines, context, and activities. Evidence-based guidance for clinicians (...) and families involves four principles: healthy management , meaningful screen use, positive modelling , and balanced, informed monitoring of screen time and behaviours.  Keywords: Adolescents; Children; Development; Digital media; Family; Health; Screen use

2019 Canadian Paediatric Society

9. Efficacy and Safety of Fast-Acting Insulin Aspart Compared With Insulin Aspart, Both in Combination With Insulin Degludec, in Children and Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes: The onset 7 Trial

Efficacy and Safety of Fast-Acting Insulin Aspart Compared With Insulin Aspart, Both in Combination With Insulin Degludec, in Children and Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes: The onset 7 Trial To confirm efficacy and safety of fast-acting insulin aspart (faster aspart) versus insulin aspart (IAsp), both with basal insulin degludec, in a pediatric population with type 1 diabetes.After a 12-week run-in, this treat-to-target, 26-week, multicenter trial randomized participants (1 to <18 years (...) insulin dose was 0.92 units/kg for mealtime faster aspart, 0.92 units/kg for postmeal faster aspart, and 0.88 units/kg for mealtime IAsp.In children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes, mealtime and postmeal faster aspart with insulin degludec provided effective glycemic control with no additional safety risks versus IAsp. Mealtime faster aspart provided superior HbA1c control compared with IAsp.© 2019 by the American Diabetes Association.

2019 EvidenceUpdates

10. Neonatal Herpes Simplex Virus Infection Among Medicaid-Enrolled Children: 2009-2015

Neonatal Herpes Simplex Virus Infection Among Medicaid-Enrolled Children: 2009-2015 To examine the incidence, mortality, and health care use related to neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection.A retrospective longitudinal cohort study using a multistate Medicaid claims database. We identified neonates hospitalized with HSV infection from 2009 to 2015 by using discharge diagnosis codes and managed them for 6 months after discharge. Incidence rates were corrected for the imperfect

2019 EvidenceUpdates

11. Are Antibiotics Effective in the Treatment of Children With Prolonged Wet Cough?

Are Antibiotics Effective in the Treatment of Children With Prolonged Wet Cough? Are Antibiotics Effective in the Treatment of Children With Prolonged Wet Cough? - Annals of Emergency Medicine Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Share this page Access provided by Volume 73, Issue 5, Pages 453–455 Are Antibiotics Effective in the Treatment of Children With Prolonged Wet Cough? x Brit Long , MD (EBEM Commentator) , x Michael D. April , MD, DPhil (EBEM (...) Commentator) Department of Emergency Medicine, San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Fort Sam Houston, TX DOI: | Publication History Published online: November 13, 2018 Expand all Collapse all Article Outline Take-Home Message Antibiotics may improve clinical cure and reduce progression of illness in children with prolonged wet cough. Methods Data Sources Authors identified trials from the Cochrane Airways Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE OvidSP, and EMBASE OvidSP through September

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2019 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

12. Medical interventions for the prevention of platinum-induced hearing loss in children with cancer. (PubMed)

Medical interventions for the prevention of platinum-induced hearing loss in children with cancer. Platinum-based therapy, including cisplatin, carboplatin, oxaliplatin or a combination of these, is used to treat a variety of paediatric malignancies. One of the most significant adverse effects is the occurrence of hearing loss or ototoxicity. In an effort to prevent this ototoxicity, different otoprotective medical interventions have been studied. This review is the third update of a previously (...) published Cochrane Review.To assess the efficacy of medical interventions to prevent hearing loss and to determine possible effects of these interventions on antitumour efficacy, toxicities other than hearing loss and quality of life in children with cancer treated with platinum-based therapy as compared to placebo, no additional treatment or another protective medical intervention.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE (PubMed) and Embase (Ovid) to 8 January 2019. We

2019 Cochrane

13. Preventive lipid-based nutrient supplements given with complementary foods to infants and young children 6 to 23 months of age for health, nutrition, and developmental outcomes. (PubMed)

Preventive lipid-based nutrient supplements given with complementary foods to infants and young children 6 to 23 months of age for health, nutrition, and developmental outcomes. One nutritional intervention advocated to prevent malnutrition among children is lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS). LNS provide a range of vitamins and minerals, but unlike most other micronutrient supplements, LNS also provide energy, protein and essential fatty acids. Alternative recipes and formulations to LNS (...) include fortified blended foods (FBF), which are foods fortified with vitamins and minerals, and micronutrient powders (MNP), which are a combination of vitamins and minerals, OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects and safety of preventive LNS given with complementary foods on health, nutrition and developmental outcomes of non-hospitalised infants and children six to 23 months of age, and whether or not they are more effective than other foods (including FBF or MNP).This review did not assess the effects

2019 Cochrane

14. Mepolizumab (Nucala) - severe refractory eosinophilic asthma in adolescents and children aged 6 years and older

Mepolizumab (Nucala) - severe refractory eosinophilic asthma in adolescents and children aged 6 years and older Final Appraisal Recommendation Advice No: 0619 – April 2019 Mepolizumab (Nucala ® ) 100 mg powder for solution for injection Limited submission by GlaxoSmithKline UK Additional note(s): • Please refer to the Summary of Product Characteristics for the full licensed indication. In reaching the above recommendation AWMSG has taken account of the appraisal documentation prepared (...) ) is recommended as an option for restricted use within NHS Wales. Mepolizumab (Nucala ® ) is licensed as an add-on treatment for severe refractory eosinophilic asthma in adolescents and children aged 6 years and older. Mepolizumab (Nucala ® ) is restricted for use in a subpopulation of the licensed indication in line with the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence recommendation for the restricted use of mepolizumab for treating severe refractory eosinophilic asthma in adults (TA431). Mepolizumab

2019 All Wales Medicines Strategy Group

15. Pheochromocytoma in Children With MEN Type 2B

Pheochromocytoma in Children With MEN Type 2B We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Pheochromocytoma in Children and Adolescents With Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2B | The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism | Oxford Academic Search Account Menu Menu Navbar Search Filter Mobile Microsite Search Term Close search filter search input (...) Article Navigation Close mobile search navigation Article navigation January 2019 Article Navigation Pheochromocytoma in Children and Adolescents With Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2B Angeliki Makri Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland Correspondence and Reprint Requests: Angeliki Makri, MD, MSc, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National

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2019 Pediatric Endocrine Society

16. Liraglutide in Children and Adolescents with Type 2 Diabetes. (PubMed)

Liraglutide in Children and Adolescents with Type 2 Diabetes. Metformin is the regulatory-approved treatment of choice for most youth with type 2 diabetes early in the disease. However, early loss of glycemic control has been observed with metformin monotherapy. Whether liraglutide added to metformin (with or without basal insulin treatment) is safe and effective in youth with type 2 diabetes is unknown.Patients who were 10 to less than 17 years of age were randomly assigned, in a 1:1 ratio (...) %] with liraglutide and 55 [80.9%] with placebo), but the overall rates of adverse events and gastrointestinal adverse events were higher with liraglutide.In children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes, liraglutide, at a dose of up to 1.8 mg per day (added to metformin, with or without basal insulin), was efficacious in improving glycemic control over 52 weeks. This efficacy came at the cost of an increased frequency of gastrointestinal adverse events. (Funded by Novo Nordisk; Ellipse ClinicalTrials.gov number

2019 NEJM

17. Levetiracetam versus phenytoin for second-line treatment of convulsive status epilepticus in children (ConSEPT): an open-label, multicentre, randomised controlled trial. (PubMed)

Levetiracetam versus phenytoin for second-line treatment of convulsive status epilepticus in children (ConSEPT): an open-label, multicentre, randomised controlled trial. Phenytoin is the current standard of care for second-line treatment of paediatric convulsive status epilepticus after failure of first-line benzodiazepines, but is only effective in 60% of cases and is associated with considerable adverse effects. A newer anticonvulsant, levetiracetam, can be given more quickly, is potentially (...) more efficacious, and has a more tolerable adverse effect profile. We aimed to determine whether phenytoin or levetiracetam is the superior second-line treatment for paediatric convulsive status epilepticus.ConSEPT was an open-label, multicentre, randomised controlled trial conducted in 13 emergency departments in Australia and New Zealand. Children aged between 3 months and 16 years, with convulsive status epilepticus that failed first-line benzodiazepine treatment, were randomly assigned (1:1

2019 Lancet

18. Screening for Elevated Blood Lead Levels in Children and Pregnant Women: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. (PubMed)

Screening for Elevated Blood Lead Levels in Children and Pregnant Women: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. Elevated blood lead levels in children are associated with neurologic effects such as behavioral and learning problems, lower IQ, hyperactivity, hearing problems, and impaired growth. In pregnant women, lead exposure can impair organ systems such as the hematopoietic, hepatic, renal, and nervous systems, and increase the risk of preeclampsia and adverse perinatal (...) outcomes. Many of the adverse health effects of lead exposure are irreversible.To update the 2006 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for elevated blood lead levels in children and pregnant women.The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the benefits and harms of screening for and treatment of elevated blood lead levels. In this update, an elevated blood lead level was defined according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reference level of 5 μg/dL.The USPSTF

2019 JAMA

19. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion versus multiple daily injection regimens in children and young people at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes: pragmatic randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation. (PubMed)

Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion versus multiple daily injection regimens in children and young people at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes: pragmatic randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation. To compare the efficacy, safety, and cost utility of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) with multiple daily injection (MDI) regimens during the first year following diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in children and young people.Pragmatic, multicentre, open label, parallel group (...) ketoacidosis were low in both groups. Fifty four non-serious and 14 serious adverse events were reported during CSII treatment, and 17 non-serious and eight serious adverse events during MDI treatment. Parents (but not children) reported superior PedsQL scores for those patients treated with CSII compared to those treated with MDI. CSII was more expensive than MDI by £1863 (€2179; $2474; 95% confidence interval £1620 to £2137) per patient, with no additional QALY gains (difference -0.006 (95% confidence

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2019 BMJ

20. Psychological therapies (remotely delivered) for the management of chronic and recurrent pain in children and adolescents. (PubMed)

Psychological therapies (remotely delivered) for the management of chronic and recurrent pain in children and adolescents. This is the first update of a review published in 2015, Issue 1. Chronic pain is common during childhood and adolescence and is associated with negative outcomes, such as increased severity of pain, reduced function, and low mood. Psychological therapies, traditionally delivered face-to-face with a therapist, are efficacious at reducing pain intensity and disability (...) . To address barriers to treatment access, such as distance and cost of treatment, technology is being used to deliver these psychological therapies remotely. Therapies delivered remotely, such as via the Internet, computer-based programmes, and smartphone applications, can be used to deliver treatment to children and adolescents with chronic pain.To determine the efficacy of psychological therapies delivered remotely compared to waiting list, treatment as usual, or active control treatments

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2019 Cochrane