Latest & greatest articles for clonidine

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Top results for clonidine

41. Randomized, controlled trial of clonidine for smoking cessation in a primary care setting. (PubMed)

Randomized, controlled trial of clonidine for smoking cessation in a primary care setting. Clonidine hydrochloride has been reported to reduce tobacco withdrawal symptoms and facilitate smoking cessation. We enrolled 185 subjects, 92 receiving clonidine and 93 receiving placebo, in a randomized, double-blind study of clonidine for smoking cessation in a primary care setting. Clonidine had no demonstrable effect on withdrawal (8 of 11 measures favoring placebo). At 4 weeks, 17 (18%) subjects (...) receiving clonidine had quit compared with 13 (14%) receiving placebo (chi 2 = 0.7; 90% confidence interval of benefit from clonidine, -4% to 13%). At 4 weeks, the mean number of cigarettes smoked was 17.7 for those receiving clonidine and 17.5 for those receiving placebo (t = 0.1; 90% confidence interval of benefit from clonidine, -4.1 to 3.7 cigarettes per day). These results provide little support for a beneficial effect of clonidine on tobacco withdrawal symptoms, quitting, or smoking reduction

1989 JAMA

42. Lack of benefit of clonidine treatment for short stature in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. (PubMed)

Lack of benefit of clonidine treatment for short stature in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Twelve short (more than two standard deviations below the mean height for age), prepubertal children (ten boys, two girls) who had a normal peak growth hormone (GH) response to provocative stimulation with clonidine (more than 10 ng/ml) were enrolled in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study of the effects of a single, nightly dose of clonidine (0.1 mg/m2 by mouth). The children's (...) mean age was 7.2 years (range 3.6-10.5 years). The results of 6 months of clonidine therapy were compared with those of 6 months of placebo. Clonidine therapy resulted in no significant difference in height standard deviation score, growth velocity, bone age, 24 h integrated GH concentration, peak GH response to clonidine stimulation, levels of insulin-like growth factor 1, or predicted height by the RWT method. In contrast to other studies, this study shows no sustained increases in GH production

1988 Lancet

43. Heavy smokers, smoking cessation, and clonidine. Results of a double-blind, randomized trial. (PubMed)

Heavy smokers, smoking cessation, and clonidine. Results of a double-blind, randomized trial. Seventy-one heavy smokers who had failed in previous attempts to stop smoking participated in a randomized clinical trial to test the efficacy of clonidine as an aid in smoking cessation. The success rate in clonidine-treated subjects (verified by serum cotinine concentration) was more than twice that in the placebo-treated subjects. When the data were stratified by gender, a strong effect present (...) in women was not apparent in men. After six months, cessation rates remained significantly higher among smokers treated with clonidine than those receiving placebo. The data also revealed an unexpectedly high prevalence (61%) of a history of major depression in this sample and a significant negative effect of such a history on cessation regardless of treatment. These findings, highly suggestive of an important role of clonidine in smoking cessation, warrant further studies to establish the long-term

1988 JAMA

44. Clonidine blocks acute opiate-withdrawal symptoms. (PubMed)

Clonidine blocks acute opiate-withdrawal symptoms. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial, clonidine eliminated objective signs and subjective symptoms of opiate withdrawal for 240--360 min in eleven addicts in a hospital setting. In an open pilot study of the effects of clonidine on longer-term opiate abstinence and symptoms, the same patients did well while taking clonidine for one week. There was only one documented instance of heroin use, in a patient who did not take (...) clonidine after hospital discharge. 6 weeks or more after the study, four patients were back on reduced doses of methadone, one was on tricyclic antidepressants, and seven were off of all opiates. All eleven patients were doing well. These data suggest that opiate withdrawal is due to increased neuronal activity in areas such as the locus coeruleus which are regulated by both alpha-2 adrenergic and opiate receptors.

1978 Lancet