Latest & greatest articles for colorectal cancer

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Top results for colorectal cancer

1. Endoscopic management of Lynch syndrome and of familial risk of colorectal cancer: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guideline

Endoscopic management of Lynch syndrome and of familial risk of colorectal cancer: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guideline EndoscopicmanagementofLynchsyndromeandof familialriskof colorectalcancer:EuropeanSocietyofGastrointestinalEndoscopy (ESGE) Guideline Authors MoniqueE. vanLeerdam 1,2 ,VictorineH.Roos 3 ,JeaninE.vanHooft 3 ,FrancescBalaguer 4,5 ,EvelienDekker 3 ,MichalF. Kaminski 6,7,8 ,AndrewLatchford 9,10 ,HelmutNeumann 11 ,LuigiRicciardiello 12 ,MariaRupinska 6,7 (...) that practice monitoring of compliance and endoscopic performance measures. Strong recommendation, low quality evidence, level of agreement 100%. Appendices 1s,2s Online content viewableat: https://doi.org/10.1055/a-1016-4977 Guideline 1082 van Leerdam Monique E. et al. Endoscopic managementof Lynch syndromeand of familial riskofcolorectal cancer… Endoscopy 2019; 51: 1082–1093 Elektronischer Sonderdruck zur persönlichen Verwendung 1Introduction Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most incident cancer

2020 European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

2. Endoscopic surveillance after surgical or endoscopic resection for colorectal cancer

Endoscopic surveillance after surgical or endoscopic resection for colorectal cancer Endoscopic surveillance after surgical or endoscopic resection for colorectal cancer: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and European Society of Digestive Oncology (ESDO) Guideline – European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) +49-89-9077936-11 Menu DOI https://doi.org/10.1055/a-0831-2522 Endoscopy 2019; 51: 266–277 © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart· New York Explore the ESGE

2019 European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

3. Endoscopic management of Lynch syndrome and of familial risk of colorectal cancer

Endoscopic management of Lynch syndrome and of familial risk of colorectal cancer Endoscopic management of Lynch syndrome and of familial risk of colorectal cancer: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guideline – European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) +49-89-9077936-11 Menu DOI https://doi.org/10.1055/a-1016-4977 | Endoscopy 2019; 51:1082–1093 Published online: 9.10.2019 © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York Explore the ESGE website Menu Contact us +49

2019 European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

4. Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal Cancer 1.1 Editors © German Guideline Program in Oncology | Evidenced-based Guideline for Colorectal Cancer | Version 2.1 | Januar 2019 1 Evidenced-based Guideline for Colorectal Cancer Version 2.1 – Januar 2019 AWMF-Registration Number: 021/007OL 1.1 Editors © German Guideline Program in Oncology | Evidenced-based Guideline for Colorectal Cancer | Version 2.1 | Januar 2019 2 Table of Contents 1. Information on this Guideline 11 1.1. Editors 11 1.2. Leading Professional Society 11 (...) Program in Oncology | Evidenced-based Guideline for Colorectal Cancer | Version 2.1 | Januar 2019 3 3.1. Lifestyle Habits 29 3.2. Diet Recommendations 30 3.3. Micronutrients 34 3.4. Drugs 35 4. Screening Asymptomatic Population 38 4.1. Screening - Age 38 4.2. Methods of Colorectal Screening/Prevention 38 4.2.1. Endoscopic Methods 39 4.2.1.1. Colonoscopy 39 4.2.1.2. Sigmoidoscopy 40 4.2.1.3. Capsule-Colonoscopy 41 4.2.2. Stool Tests 42 4.2.2.1. Fecal Occult Blood Test (FOBT) 42 4.2.2.2. Genetic

2019 German Guideline Program in Oncology

5. Bevacizumab (Zirabev) - colorectal cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, peritoneal cancer, glioblastoma

Bevacizumab (Zirabev) - colorectal cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, peritoneal cancer, glioblastoma Search Page - Drug and Health Product Register Language selection Search and menus Search Search website Search Topics menu You are here: Summary Basis of Decision - - Health Canada Expand all Summary Basis of Decision (SBD) for Contact: Summary Basis of Decision (SBD) documents provide information related to the original authorization of a product. The for is located below. Recent Activity

2019 Health Canada - Drug and Health Product Register

6. Screening for Colorectal Cancer in Asymptomatic Average-Risk Adults

Screening for Colorectal Cancer in Asymptomatic Average-Risk Adults Screening for Colorectal Cancer in Asymptomatic Average-Risk Adults | Annals of Internal Medicine | American College of Physicians '); } '); })(); Sign in below to access your subscription for full content INDIVIDUAL SIGN IN | You will be directed to acponline.org to register and create your Annals account INSTITUTIONAL SIGN IN | | Subscribe to Annals of Internal Medicine . You will be directed to acponline.org to complete your (...) purchase. Search Clinical Guidelines | 5 November 2019 Screening for Colorectal Cancer in Asymptomatic Average-Risk Adults: A Guidance Statement From the American College of Physicians Free Amir Qaseem, MD, PhD, MHA; Carolyn J. Crandall, MD, MS; Reem A. Mustafa, MD, MPH, PhD; Lauri A. Hicks, DO; Timothy J. Wilt, MD, MPH ; for the Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of Physicians Amir Qaseem, MD, PhD, MHA American College of Physicians, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (A.Q.) Carolyn J

2019 American College of Physicians

7. Colorectal cancer screening with faecal immunochemical testing, sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy

Colorectal cancer screening with faecal immunochemical testing, sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy Colorectal cancer screening with faecal immunochemical testing, sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy: a clinical practice guideline | The BMJ Intended for healthcare professionals Username * Password * Edition: Search form Search Search Colorectal cancer... Colorectal cancer screening with faecal immunochemical testing, sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy: a clinical practice guideline (Published 02 October 2019) Cite (...) this as: BMJ 2019;367:l5515 Visual summary of recommendation No screening FIT Every year FIT Every two years Sigmoidoscopy Single Colonoscopy Single Favours no screening Favours screening We suggest no screening Interventions compared Recommendations Screening options Population We suggest using a tool such as the QCancer® calculator to estimate the risk of colorectal cancer for each person in the next 15 years. This calculates risk, based on: Understanding a person’s risk of cancer can help to determine

2019 BMJ Rapid Recommendations

8. Colorectal cancer screening with faecal testing, sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy: a systematic review and network meta-analysis

Colorectal cancer screening with faecal testing, sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy: a systematic review and network meta-analysis Evaluate effectiveness, harms and burdens of faecal blood testing, sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy screening for colorectal cancer over 15 years.We performed an update of a Cochrane systematic review, and performed network meta-analysis comparing randomised trials evaluating colorectal cancer screening with guaiac faecal occult blood test (gFOBT) (annual, biennial), faecal (...) immunochemical test (FIT) (annual, biennial), sigmoidoscopy (once-only) or colonoscopy (once-only) in a healthy population, aged 50-79 years. We conducted subgroup analysis on sex. Follow-up >5 years was required for analysis of colorectal cancer incidence and mortality.12 randomised trials proved eligible. Compared with no-screening, we found high certainty evidence for sigmoidoscopy screening slightly reducing colorectal cancer incidence (relative risk (RR) 0.76; 95% confidence interval (CI 0.70 to 0.83

2019 EvidenceUpdates

9. Colorectal cancer screening with faecal immunochemical testing, sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy: a microsimulation modelling study. (PubMed)

Colorectal cancer screening with faecal immunochemical testing, sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy: a microsimulation modelling study. To estimate benefits and harms of different colorectal cancer screening strategies, stratified by (baseline) 15-year colorectal cancer risk.Microsimulation modelling study using MIcrosimulation SCreening ANalysis-Colon (MISCAN-Colon).A parallel guideline committee (BMJ Rapid Recommendations) defined the time frame and screening interventions, including selection (...) of outcome measures.Norwegian men and women aged 50-79 years with varying 15-year colorectal cancer risk (1-7%).Four screening strategies were compared with no screening: biennial or annual faecal immunochemical test (FIT) or single sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy at 100% adherence.Colorectal cancer mortality and incidence, burdens, and harms over 15 years of follow-up. The certainty of the evidence was assessed using the GRADE approach.Over 15 years of follow-up, screening individuals aged 50-79 at 3% risk

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2019 BMJ

10. Colorectal cancer screening with faecal immunochemical testing, sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy: a clinical practice guideline. (PubMed)

Colorectal cancer screening with faecal immunochemical testing, sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy: a clinical practice guideline. Recent 15-year updates of sigmoidoscopy screening trials provide new evidence on the effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening. Prompted by the new evidence, we asked: "Does colorectal cancer screening make an important difference to health outcomes in individuals initiating screening at age 50 to 79? And which screening option is best?"Numerous guidelines recommend (...) screening, but vary on recommended test, age and screening frequency. This guideline looks at the evidence and makes recommendations on screening for four screening options: faecal immunochemical test (FIT) every year, FIT every two years, a single sigmoidoscopy, or a single colonoscopy.These recommendations apply to adults aged 50-79 years with no prior screening, no symptoms of colorectal cancer, and a life expectancy of at least 15 years. For individuals with an estimated 15-year colorectal cancer

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2019 BMJ

11. Occult Blood Detection Testing for Non-Colorectal Cancer Related Medical Conditions: Clinical Effectiveness

Occult Blood Detection Testing for Non-Colorectal Cancer Related Medical Conditions: Clinical Effectiveness Occult Blood Detection Testing for Non-Colorectal Cancer Related Medical Conditions: Clinical Effectiveness | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Occult Blood Detection Testing for Non-Colorectal Cancer Related Medical Conditions: Clinical Effectiveness Occult Blood Detection Testing for Non-Colorectal Cancer Related Medical Conditions: Clinical Effectiveness Last updated: April 15 (...) , 2019 Project Number: RA1026-000 Product Line: Research Type: Devices and Systems Report Type: Reference List Result type: Report Question What is the clinical effectiveness of the fecal immunochemical test in detecting medical conditions other than colorectal cancer where occult blood detection is needed? What is the clinical effectiveness of the guaiac fecal blood occult test in detecting medical conditions other than colorectal cancer where occult blood detection is needed? Key Message

2019 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

12. Mvasi for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer / Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Biosimilar – Details

Mvasi for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer / Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Biosimilar – Details Mvasi for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer / Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Biosimilar – Details | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Mvasi for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer / Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Biosimilar – Details Mvasi for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer / Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Biosimilar – Details Project Number pCODR 10158 Brand Name Mvasi Generic Name Bevacizumab Strength 100 mg and 400 mg Tumour (...) Type Gastrointestinal / Lung Indication Metastatic Colorectal Cancer / Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Biosimilar Funding Request For first-line treatment of patients with metastatic carcinoma of the colon or rectum, in combination with fluoropyrimidine based chemotherapy / For treatment of patients with unresectable advanced, metastatic or recurrent non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer, in combination with carboplatin/paclitaxel chemotherapy regimen Review Status Final Biosimilar Dossier Issued Pre

2019 CADTH - Pan Canadian Oncology Drug Review

13. Trifluridine and Tipiracil (Lonsurf) for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Resubmission – Details

Trifluridine and Tipiracil (Lonsurf) for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Resubmission – Details Trifluridine and Tipiracil (Lonsurf) for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Resubmission – Details | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Trifluridine and Tipiracil (Lonsurf) for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Resubmission – Details Trifluridine and Tipiracil (Lonsurf) for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Resubmission – Details Project Number pCODR 10173 Brand Name Lonsurf Generic Name Trifluridine and Tipiracil (...) Strength 15 mg & 20 mg Tumour Type Gastrointestinal Indication Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Funding Request Treatment of adult patients with mCRC who have been previously treated with, or are not candidates for, available therapies including fluoropyrimidine-, oxaliplatin- and irinotecan-based chemotherapies, anti-VEGF biological agents, and, if RAS wild-type, anti-EGFR agents Review Status Notification to Implement Issued Pre Noc Submission No NOC Date January 25, 2018 Manufacturer Taiho Pharma Canada

2019 CADTH - Pan Canadian Oncology Drug Review

14. Post-polypectomy and post-colorectal cancer resection surveillance guidelines

Post-polypectomy and post-colorectal cancer resection surveillance guidelines 1 | P a g e BSG/ACPGBI/PHE Post-polypectomy and post-colorectal cancer resection surveillance guidelines Title page Lead author & corresponding author: Professor Matthew D. Rutter Professor of Gastroenterology (1) University Hospital of North Tees, Stockton-on-Tees, TS19 8PE, UK (address for correspondence) (2) Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK Matt.rutter@nth.nhs.uk +44 (0 (...) words 3 | P a g e Abstract These consensus guidelines were jointly commissioned by the British Society of Gastroenterology, the Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland and Public Health England. They provide an evidence-based framework for the use of surveillance colonoscopy and non-colonoscopic colorectal imaging in people aged 18 and over. They are the first guidelines that take into account the introduction of national bowel cancer screening. For the first time, they also

2019 British Society of Gastroenterology

15. Guidelines for the management of hereditary colorectal cancer

Guidelines for the management of hereditary colorectal cancer Guidelines for the management of hereditary colorectal cancer from the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG)/ Association of Coloproctologists of Great Britain and Ireland (ACPGBI)/ United Kingdom Cancer Genetics Group (UKCGG) Authors *Kevin J Monahan, BSG, Consultant Gastroenterologist, Family Cancer Clinic, St Marks Hospital, Harrow, London; Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College, London. Malcolm Dunlop, ACPGBI (...) , UKCGG, Consultant Clinical Geneticist, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London. Ian Tomlinson, UKCGG, Director of Institute of Cancer and Genomic Sciences, University of Birmingham Huw Thomas, BSG, Professor of Medicine and Consultant Gastroenterologist, Family Cancer Clinic, St Marks Hospital, Harrow, London; Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College, London. James Hill, ACPGBI, Clinical Professor of Colorectal Surgery, Manchester Royal Infirmary and Manchester Academic Health

2019 British Society of Gastroenterology

16. Colorectal Cancer Screening Evidence Brief

Colorectal Cancer Screening Evidence Brief 1 Age to Initiate Colorectal Cancer Screening in Average Risk Individuals: Evidence Brief, June 2019 Key Points • Colorectal cancer incidence and mortality are increasing in individuals under age 50. • Simulation models suggest there may be benefit to screening average risk patients beginning at age 45, but it is unclear if this benefit outweighs the risks of screening • Patients age 45-49 who express interest in screening should be engaged in shared (...) -decision making to discuss the risks and benefits • It is strongly recommended that all average risk patients 50 years and older should be screened for colon cancer • Extra vigilance for symptoms and risk factors of colon cancer (including family history in people aged 45-49) is advised given increasing colorectal cancer rates in this group. Definition of Average Risk This guidance applies to individuals at average risk for colorectal cancer. Patients not considered average risk include those

2019 Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement

17. Encorafenib, Binimetinib, and Cetuximab in <i>BRAF</i> V600E-Mutated Colorectal Cancer. (PubMed)

Encorafenib, Binimetinib, and Cetuximab in BRAF V600E-Mutated Colorectal Cancer. Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer with the BRAF V600E mutation have a poor prognosis, with a median overall survival of 4 to 6 months after failure of initial therapy. Inhibition of BRAF alone has limited activity because of pathway reactivation through epidermal growth factor receptor signaling.In this open-label, phase 3 trial, we enrolled 665 patients with BRAF V600E-mutated metastatic colorectal (...) with metastatic colorectal cancer with the BRAF V600E mutation. (Funded by Array BioPharma and others; BEACON CRC ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02928224; EudraCT number, 2015-005805-35.).Copyright © 2019 Massachusetts Medical Society.

2019 NEJM

18. Whole body MRI is effective for identifying metastatic disease in colorectal cancer patients. (PubMed)

Whole body MRI is effective for identifying metastatic disease in colorectal cancer patients. The studyTaylor S, Mallett S, Beare S et al. Diagnostic accuracy of whole-body MRI versus standard imaging pathways for metastatic disease in newly diagnosed colorectal cancer: the prospective Streamline C trial. Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol 2019;4:529-37.This project was funded by the NIHR Health Technology Assessment Programme (project number 10/68/01).To read the full NIHR Signal, go to https (...) ://discover.dc.nihr.ac.uk/content/signal-000797/identifying-metastatic-disease-in-colorectal-cancer-with-whole-body-mri.Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

2019 BMJ

19. Follow-up strategies for patients treated for non-metastatic colorectal cancer. (PubMed)

Follow-up strategies for patients treated for non-metastatic colorectal cancer. This is the fourth update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2002 and last updated in 2016.It is common clinical practice to follow patients with colorectal cancer for several years following their curative surgery or adjuvant therapy, or both. Despite this widespread practice, there is considerable controversy about how often patients should be seen, what tests should be performed, and whether these varying (...) strategies have any significant impact on patient outcomes.To assess the effect of follow-up programmes (follow-up versus no follow-up, follow-up strategies of varying intensity, and follow-up in different healthcare settings) on overall survival for patients with colorectal cancer treated with curative intent. Secondary objectives are to assess relapse-free survival, salvage surgery, interval recurrences, quality of life, and the harms and costs of surveillance and investigations.For this update, on 5

2019 Cochrane

20. Multicentre randomized clinical trial of colonic J pouch or straight stapled colorectal reconstruction after low anterior resection for rectal cancer

Multicentre randomized clinical trial of colonic J pouch or straight stapled colorectal reconstruction after low anterior resection for rectal cancer Colonic J pouch reconstruction has been found to be associated with a lower incidence of anastomotic leakage than straight anastomosis. However, studies on this topic are underpowered and retrospective. This randomized trial evaluated whether the incidence of anastomotic leakage was reduced after colonic J pouch reconstruction compared (...) with straight colorectal anastomosis following anterior resection for rectal cancer.This multicentre RCT included patients with rectal carcinoma who underwent low anterior resection followed by colorectal anastomosis. Patients were assigned randomly to receive a colonic J pouch or straight colorectal anastomosis. The main outcome measure was the occurrence of major anastomotic leakage. The incidence of global (major plus minor) anastomotic leakage and general complications were secondary outcomes. Risk

2019 EvidenceUpdates