Latest & greatest articles for colorectal cancer

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Top results for colorectal cancer

1061. Beneficial effect of autologous blood transfusion on infectious complications after colorectal cancer surgery. (PubMed)

Beneficial effect of autologous blood transfusion on infectious complications after colorectal cancer surgery. Homologous blood transfusion has been associated with an increased risk of postoperative infectious complications. To test the clinical consequences of this apparently immunosuppressive effect of homologous blood in a controlled trial, we designed a study in which the control group deposited autologous blood before their operations for use should transfusion be needed. We enrolled 120 (...) patients with apparently curable colorectal cancer who were able to predeposit autologous blood (haemoglobin > 12.5 g/dL). 62 patients were assigned to receive homologous blood if blood transfusions were needed during operation, and the other 58 to receive their own predeposited blood followed, if necessary, by homologous blood [corrected]. Despite the similarity between the groups in factors known to affect the risk of postoperative infections, there was a significant difference in postoperative

1993 Lancet

1062. Randomised comparison of combination chemotherapy plus supportive care with supportive care alone in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. (PubMed)

Randomised comparison of combination chemotherapy plus supportive care with supportive care alone in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. To compare the length of survival and quality of life in patients given combination chemotherapy in addition to supportive care and in patients given only supportive care.Randomised study.Gastrointestinal oncology departments.40 previously untreated patients with histologically confirmed, measurable colorectal cancer that was locally recurrent (...) this sample of patients with disseminated colorectal cancer the chemotherapy regimen was an effective form of palliative treatment.

Full Text available with Trip Pro

1993 BMJ

1063. Filtering strategies in mass population screening for colorectal cancer: an economic evaluation

Filtering strategies in mass population screening for colorectal cancer: an economic evaluation Filtering strategies in mass population screening for colorectal cancer: an economic evaluation Filtering strategies in mass population screening for colorectal cancer: an economic evaluation Walker A, Whynes D K Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results (...) and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology The use of mass population filtering strategies for the selection of individuals requiring further screening (colonoscopic investigation) for the detection of colorectal cancer (CRC). The strategies examined were as follows. Strategy 1: the Hemoccult faecal occult blood (FOB) test. A 3-day test, with no subsequent retesting of positives or negatives. Strategy 2: the Hemoccult

1992 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

1064. Randomised, controlled trial of faecal occult blood screening for colorectal cancer. Results for first 107,349 subjects. (PubMed)

Randomised, controlled trial of faecal occult blood screening for colorectal cancer. Results for first 107,349 subjects. To assess the effectiveness of screening by faecal occult blood tests, 107,349 people without symptoms of colorectal disease identified from general practitioner records have been randomly allocated to test and control groups. 53,464 test subjects were invited to carry out the screening test; 27,651 (53%) of the 52,258 who received the tests did so. Further investigation (...) A) was 0.72 per 1000 person-years. Cancers detected by screening were at a less advanced pathological stage, but it is too early to show any effect of screening on mortality from colorectal cancer.

1989 Lancet

1065. Colorectal cancer chemotherapy: meta-analysis or large-scale trials? (PubMed)

Colorectal cancer chemotherapy: meta-analysis or large-scale trials? 3373709 1988 07 14 2016 10 17 0098-7484 259 24 1988 Jun 24 JAMA JAMA Colorectal cancer chemotherapy: meta-analysis or large-scale trials? 3611 Levin B B O'Connell M J MJ eng Editorial United States JAMA 7501160 0098-7484 U3P01618RT Fluorouracil AIM IM Clinical Trials as Topic Colonic Neoplasms therapy Combined Modality Therapy Fluorouracil therapeutic use Humans Rectal Neoplasms therapy Research Design 1988 6 24 1988 6 24 0 1

1988 JAMA

1066. Controlled trial of faecal occult blood testing in the detection of colorectal cancer. (PubMed)

Controlled trial of faecal occult blood testing in the detection of colorectal cancer. 20 525 patients from general practitioners' lists were randomly allocated into test and control groups. The 10 253 test subjects were invited to perform haemoccult faecal occult blood testing over 3 days. 3613 (36 . 8%) of the 9807 who received their invitations completed the test. Compliance was improved by direct invitation from the general practitioner and by prior health education by letter or interview

1983 Lancet

1067. Prolongation of postoperative disease-free interval and survival in human colorectal cancer by B.C.G. or B.C.G. plus 5-fluorouracil. (PubMed)

Prolongation of postoperative disease-free interval and survival in human colorectal cancer by B.C.G. or B.C.G. plus 5-fluorouracil. 83 patients with colorectal carcinoma of the Dukes' C class were randomised to receive postoperative adjuvant therapy with B.C.G. alone or in combination with oral doses of 5-fluorouracil (5-F.U.), and have been followed for up to thirty months. Results were compared with carefully selected historical controls who were treated by surgery alone. A statistically (...) 0.04) and ineffective (as yet) among 23 patients with 5 or less positive lymph-nodes. These results suggest that adjuvant immunotherapy, with or without chemotherapy, can improve the prognosis of surgically treated patients with colorectal carcinoma of the Dukes' C class.

1976 Lancet