Latest & greatest articles for constipation

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Top results for constipation

161. Methylnaltrexone reduced opioid-induced constipation in patients with terminal illness

Methylnaltrexone reduced opioid-induced constipation in patients with terminal illness Methylnaltrexone reduced opioid-induced constipation in patients with terminal illness | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers (...) of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Methylnaltrexone reduced opioid-induced constipation in patients with terminal illness Article Text Therapeutics Methylnaltrexone reduced opioid-induced constipation in patients with terminal illness Statistics from

2008 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

162. Cost-effectiveness of macrogol 4000 compared to lactulose in the treatment of chronic functional constipation in the UK

Cost-effectiveness of macrogol 4000 compared to lactulose in the treatment of chronic functional constipation in the UK Cost-effectiveness of macrogol 4000 compared to lactulose in the treatment of chronic functional constipation in the UK Cost-effectiveness of macrogol 4000 compared to lactulose in the treatment of chronic functional constipation in the UK Guest J F, Clegg J P, Helter M T Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion (...) on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. CRD summary The objective was to examine the cost-effectiveness of macrogol 4000 compared with lactulose for the treatment of chronic functional constipation in adult patients. The authors concluded that macrogol 4000 was a cost-effective treatment from the perspective of the British National Health Service

2008 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

163. Daily polyethylene glycol over 6 months was effective for chronic constipation

Daily polyethylene glycol over 6 months was effective for chronic constipation Daily polyethylene glycol over 6 months was effective for chronic constipation | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts (...) Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Daily polyethylene glycol over 6 months was effective for chronic constipation Article Text Therapeutics Daily polyethylene glycol over 6 months was effective for chronic constipation Statistics from Altmetric.com Request Permissions

2008 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

164. Effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) type 3 antagonists on symptom relief and constipation in nonconstipated irritable bowel syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) type 3 antagonists on symptom relief and constipation in nonconstipated irritable bowel syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2008 DARE.

165. Tegaserod for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome and chronic constipation. (PubMed)

Tegaserod for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome and chronic constipation. IBS is a complex disorder that encompasses a wide profile of symptoms. The symptoms of chronic constipation frequently resemble those of constipation-predominant IBS. Current drug treatments for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are of limited value. Many target specific symptoms only. Tegaserod, a 5HT(4) partial agonist, represents a novel mechanism of action in the treatment of IBS and chronic constipation.The (...) objective of this review was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of tegaserod for the treatment of IBS and chronic constipation in adults and adolescents aged 12 years and above.MEDLINE 1966-December 2006 and EMBASE 1980 to December 2006 were searched. The text and key words used included "tegaserod", "HTF 919", "irritable bowel", "constipation" and "colonic diseases, functional". The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Review Group Specialized Trials

2007 Cochrane

166. Sacral nerve stimulation for faecal incontinence and constipation in adults. (PubMed)

Sacral nerve stimulation for faecal incontinence and constipation in adults. Faecal incontinence and constipation are disabling conditions that reduce quality of life. If conservative treatment fails, one option is sacral nerve stimulation (SNS), a minimally invasive technique allowing modulation of the nerves and muscles of the pelvic floor and hindgut.To assess the effects of SNS for faecal incontinence and constipation in adults.We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Trials (...) Register (searched 24 April 2007) and the reference lists of relevant articles.All randomised or quasi-randomised trials assessing the effects of SNS for faecal incontinence or constipation in adults.Two review authors independently screened the search results, assessed the methodological quality of the included studies, and undertook data extraction.Three crossover studies were included. Two, enrolling 34 (Leroi) and two participants (Vaizey), assessed the effects of SNS for faecal incontinence

2007 Cochrane

167. Methylnatrexone for opioid induced constipation in advanced illness and palliative care: horizon scanning technology briefing

Methylnatrexone for opioid induced constipation in advanced illness and palliative care: horizon scanning technology briefing Methylnatrexone for opioid induced constipation in advanced illness and palliative care: horizon scanning technology briefing Methylnatrexone for opioid induced constipation in advanced illness and palliative care: horizon scanning technology briefing National Horizon Scanning Centre Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment (...) from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation National Horizon Scanning Centre. Methylnatrexone for opioid induced constipation in advanced illness and palliative care: horizon scanning technology briefing. Birmingham: National Horizon Scanning Centre (NHSC). 2007 Authors' objectives This study examines the use of Methylnatrexone for opioid induced constipation in advanced illness and palliative care. Project page URL Indexing

2007 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

168. Laxatives for the management of constipation in palliative care patients. (PubMed)

Laxatives for the management of constipation in palliative care patients. Constipation is a common problem for palliative care patients which can generate considerable suffering for patients due to both the unpleasant physical symptoms and psychological preoccupations that can arise. There is uncertainty about the 'best' management of constipation in palliative care patients and variation in practice between palliative care settings.To determine the effectiveness of laxative administration (...) for the management of constipation in palliative care patients, and the differential efficacy of the laxatives used to manage constipation.We searched The Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue four, 2005), MEDLINE (1966 to January 2005), EMBASE (1980 to January 2005), CANCERLIT, PUBMED, Science Citation Index, CINAHL, The Cochrane Library, SIGLE, NTIS, DHSS-DATA, Dissertation Abstracts, Index to Scientific and Technical Proceedings and NHS-NRR and reference lists

2006 Cochrane

169. Review: good evidence supports use of polyethylene glycol and tegaserod for constipation (Full text)

Review: good evidence supports use of polyethylene glycol and tegaserod for constipation Review: good evidence supports use of polyethylene glycol and tegaserod for constipation | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers (...) of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Review: good evidence supports use of polyethylene glycol and tegaserod for constipation Article Text Treatment Review: good evidence supports use of polyethylene glycol and tegaserod for constipation Free Jane P Joy

2006 Evidence-Based Nursing PubMed

170. Review: intravenous and oral opioids reduce chronic non-cancer pain but are associated with high rates of constipation, nausea, and sleepiness (Full text)

Review: intravenous and oral opioids reduce chronic non-cancer pain but are associated with high rates of constipation, nausea, and sleepiness Review: intravenous and oral opioids reduce chronic non-cancer pain but are associated with high rates of constipation, nausea, and sleepiness | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use (...) of constipation, nausea, and sleepiness Article Text Treatment Review: intravenous and oral opioids reduce chronic non-cancer pain but are associated with high rates of constipation, nausea, and sleepiness Free Sandra M LeFort , RN, PhD Statistics from Altmetric.com Kalso E, Edwards JE, Moore RA, et al . Opioids in chronic non-cancer pain: systematic review of efficacy and safety. Pain 2004 ; 112 : 372 –80. Q Are opioids effective and safe for reducing chronic non-cancer pain? METHODS Data sources: Medline

2006 Evidence-Based Nursing PubMed

171. Management of faecal incontinence and constipation in adults with central neurological diseases. (PubMed)

Management of faecal incontinence and constipation in adults with central neurological diseases. People with neurological disease have a much higher risk of both faecal incontinence and constipation than the general population. There is often a fine line between the two conditions, with any management intended to ameliorate one risking precipitating the other. Bowel problems are observed to be the cause of much anxiety and may reduce quality of life in these people. Current bowel management (...) is largely empirical with a limited research base.To determine the effects of management strategies for faecal incontinence and constipation in people with neurological diseases affecting the central nervous system.We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Trials Register (searched 26 January 2005), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 2, 2005), MEDLINE (January 1966 to May 2005), EMBASE (January 1998 to May 2005) and all reference lists of relevant articles.All

2006 Cochrane

172. Systematic review: FDA-approved prescription medications for adults with constipation

Systematic review: FDA-approved prescription medications for adults with constipation Systematic review: FDA-approved prescription medications for adults with constipation Systematic review: FDA-approved prescription medications for adults with constipation Cash B D, Lacy B E CRD summary The authors concluded that there is a lack of high-quality evidence supporting the use of lactulose and polyethylene glycol-3350 in the treatment of chronic constipation, although the data does support use (...) in acute, episodic constipation. High-quality evidence supporting the use of tegaserod was found. Potential publication and language bias, limitations of the evidence, and differences between the studies mean that the authors' conclusions should be interpreted with caution. Authors' objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved prescription treatments for adults with constipation. Searching MEDLINE (from 1966) and EMBASE (from 1980) were searched

2006 DARE.

173. Review: soluble fibre improves overall symptoms and constipation but not abdominal pain in irritable bowel syndrome (Full text)

Review: soluble fibre improves overall symptoms and constipation but not abdominal pain in irritable bowel syndrome Review: soluble fibre improves overall symptoms and constipation but not abdominal pain in irritable bowel syndrome | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username (...) and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Review: soluble fibre improves overall symptoms and constipation but not abdominal pain in irritable bowel syndrome Article Text Therapeutics Review: soluble fibre

2005 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration) PubMed

174. Is polyethylene glycol safe and effective for chronic constipation in children?

Is polyethylene glycol safe and effective for chronic constipation in children? BestBets: Is polyethylene glycol safe and effective for chronic constipation in children? Is polyethylene glycol safe and effective for chronic constipation in children? Report By: R Arora and R Srinivasan - Specialist Registrars Search checked by Bob Phillips - Section Editor Archimedes, Archives of Disease in Childhood Institution: Llandough Hospital, Cardiff, UK Date Submitted: 25th May 2005 Date Completed: 25th (...) May 2005 Last Modified: 25th May 2005 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [children with chronic constipation] is [polyethylene glycol] better [in improving stool frequency and consistency while causing fewer side effects]? Clinical Scenario Chronic constipation is a frequently encountered problem in the paediatric wards and clinics. Your usual line of management has been to prescribe adequate doses of regular lactulose and use sodium picosulphate as a second line laxative or as add

2005 BestBETS

175. Prevention of constipation in the older adult population.

Prevention of constipation in the older adult population. Guidelines and Measures | Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality HHS.gov Search ahrq.gov Search ahrq.gov Menu Topics A - Z Healthcare Delivery Latest available findings on quality of and access to health care Searchable database of AHRQ Grants, Working Papers & HHS Recovery Act Projects AHRQ Projects funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Trust Fund You are here Guidelines and Measures Funding for the National Guideline

2005 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

176. Does successful treatment of constipation or faecal impaction resolve lower urinary tract symptoms: a structured review of the literature. Systematic review

Does successful treatment of constipation or faecal impaction resolve lower urinary tract symptoms: a structured review of the literature. Systematic review Does successful treatment of constipation or faecal impaction resolve lower urinary tract symptoms: a structured review of the literature. Systematic review Does successful treatment of constipation or faecal impaction resolve lower urinary tract symptoms: a structured review of the literature. Systematic review Ostaszkiewicz J, Ski C (...) , Hornby L CRD summary The authors concluded that there was limited and conflicting evidence about the relationship between constipation or faecal impaction and urinary incontinence and other lower urinary tract symptoms, and that further research is required. There were limitations to this review but, overall, the authors' conclusions appear to reflect the limitations of the evidence presented. Authors' objectives To evaluate the relationship between constipation or faecal impaction and urinary

2005 DARE.

177. Efficacy and safety of traditional medical therapies for chronic constipation: systematic review

Efficacy and safety of traditional medical therapies for chronic constipation: systematic review Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2005 DARE.

178. Diagnostic value of abdominal radiography in constipated children: a systematic review

Diagnostic value of abdominal radiography in constipated children: a systematic review Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2005 DARE.

179. Clinical utility of diagnostic tests for constipation in adults: a systematic review

Clinical utility of diagnostic tests for constipation in adults: a systematic review Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2005 DARE.

180. Management of constipation in residents with dementia: sorbitol effectiveness and cost

Management of constipation in residents with dementia: sorbitol effectiveness and cost Management of constipation in residents with dementia: sorbitol effectiveness and cost Management of constipation in residents with dementia: sorbitol effectiveness and cost Volicer L, Lane P, Panke J A, Lyman P Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions (...) followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology The study compared the therapeutic substitution of sorbitol for lactulose in the treatment of chronic constipation among nursing home residents with dementia. The doses ranged from 30 mL every other day to 6 mL twice daily. Type of intervention Treatment. Economic study type Cost-effectiveness analysis. Study population The study population comprised the residents of a dementia

2004 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.