Latest & greatest articles for dementia

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on dementia or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on dementia and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Top results for dementia

21. Scam Awareness Related to Incident Alzheimer Dementia and Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Prospective Cohort Study. (PubMed)

Scam Awareness Related to Incident Alzheimer Dementia and Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Prospective Cohort Study. Decreased scam awareness may be an early indicator of impending Alzheimer dementia and its precursor, mild cognitive impairment, but prior studies have not systematically examined the associations between scam awareness and adverse cognitive outcomes.To test the hypothesis that low scam awareness is associated with increased risk for incident Alzheimer dementia, mild cognitive (...) impairment, and Alzheimer disease pathology in the brain.Prospective cohort study of aging.Community-based study in the greater Chicago metropolitan area.935 older persons initially free of dementia.Scam awareness was measured via questionnaire, incident Alzheimer dementia and mild cognitive impairment were documented in detailed annual cognitive and clinical evaluations, and Alzheimer disease neuropathology was quantified after death among a subset of persons who died (n = 264). Proportional hazards

2019 Annals of Internal Medicine

22. Association of Amyloid Positron Emission Tomography With Subsequent Change in Clinical Management Among Medicare Beneficiaries With Mild Cognitive Impairment or Dementia. (PubMed)

Association of Amyloid Positron Emission Tomography With Subsequent Change in Clinical Management Among Medicare Beneficiaries With Mild Cognitive Impairment or Dementia. Amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) detects amyloid plaques in the brain, a core neuropathological feature of Alzheimer disease.To determine if amyloid PET is associated with subsequent changes in the management of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia of uncertain etiology.The Imaging Dementia (...) -Evidence for Amyloid Scanning (IDEAS) study was a single-group, multisite longitudinal study that assessed the association between amyloid PET and subsequent changes in clinical management for Medicare beneficiaries with MCI or dementia. Participants were required to meet published appropriate use criteria stating that etiology of cognitive impairment was unknown, Alzheimer disease was a diagnostic consideration, and knowledge of PET results was expected to change diagnosis and management. A total

2019 JAMA

23. Evidence Brief: Traumatic Brain Injury and Dementia

Evidence Brief: Traumatic Brain Injury and Dementia Management Briefs eBrief-no150 -- Traumatic Brain Injury and Dementia Enter search terms Button to search HSRD ® Inside VA Budget and Performance Inside the News Room National Observances Special Events » » » » » Management Briefs eBrief-no150 -- Traumatic Brain Injury and Dementia Health Services Research & Development Management eBrief no. 150 » Issue 150 March 2019 The report is a product of the VA/HSR&D Evidence Synthesis Program. Evidence (...) Brief: Traumatic Brain Injury and Dementia Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common condition among both civilian and military populations. While some TBIs cause acute symptoms that resolve over several weeks or months, evidence accumulated over nearly three decades suggests that TBI may lead to chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as dementia. More public awareness about TBI in active-duty service members as a risk factor for earlier onset of dementia and/or of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

2019 Veterans Affairs - R&D

24. Specialist nursing support for unpaid carers of people with dementia: a mixed-methods feasibility study

Specialist nursing support for unpaid carers of people with dementia: a mixed-methods feasibility study Specialist nursing support for unpaid carers of people with dementia: a mixed-methods feasibility study Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page from the navigation or try a website search above to find the information you need (...) . >> >> >> >> Issue {{metadata .Issue }} Toolkit 1)"> 0)"> 1)"> {{metadata.Title}} {{metadata.Headline}} This multimethod study may include the largest, independent, national survey of carers of people with dementia to date and it prepares the ground for future evaluation in this challenging area. {{author}} {{($index , , , , , & . Kate Gridley 1, * , Fiona Aspinal 1 , Gillian Parker 1 , Helen Weatherly 2 , Rita Faria 2 , Francesco Longo 2 , Bernard van den Berg 2 1 Social Policy Research Unit, University of York

2019 NIHR HTA programme

25. Refusal and resistance to care by people living with dementia being cared for within acute hospital wards: an ethnographic study

Refusal and resistance to care by people living with dementia being cared for within acute hospital wards: an ethnographic study Refusal and resistance to care by people living with dementia being cared for within acute hospital wards: an ethnographic study Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page from the navigation or try a website (...) search above to find the information you need. >> >> >> >> Issue {{metadata .Issue }} Toolkit 1)"> 0)"> 1)"> {{metadata.Title}} {{metadata.Headline}} Staff approaches towards people living with dementia in acute hospitals are often both a response and trigger to the high levels of resistance to care observable in the setting. {{author}} {{($index , , , , , & . Katie Featherstone 1, * , Andy Northcott 2 , Jane Harden 1 , Karen Harrison Denning 3 , Rosie Tope 4 , Sue Bale 5 , Jackie Bridges 6 1 School

2019 NIHR HTA programme

26. Cognitive training for people with mild to moderate dementia. (PubMed)

Cognitive training for people with mild to moderate dementia. Cognitive impairment, a defining feature of dementia, plays an important role in the compromised functional independence that characterises the condition. Cognitive training (CT) is an approach that uses guided practice on structured tasks with the direct aim of improving or maintaining cognitive abilities.• To assess effects of CT on cognitive and non-cognitive outcomes for people with mild to moderate dementia and their caregivers (...) .• To compare effects of CT with those of other non-pharmacological interventions, including cognitive stimulation or rehabilitation, for people with mild to moderate dementia and their caregivers.• To identify and explore factors related to intervention and trial design that may be associated with the efficacy of CT for people with mild to moderate dementia and their caregivers.We searched ALOIS, the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group Specialised Register, on 5 July 2018. ALOIS contains

2019 Cochrane

27. Computerised cognitive training for preventing dementia in people with mild cognitive impairment. (PubMed)

Computerised cognitive training for preventing dementia in people with mild cognitive impairment. The number of people living with dementia is increasing rapidly. Clinical dementia does not develop suddenly, but rather is preceded by a period of cognitive decline beyond normal age-related change. People at this intermediate stage between normal cognitive function and clinical dementia are often described as having mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Considerable research and clinical efforts have (...) been directed toward finding disease-modifying interventions that may prevent or delay progression from MCI to clinical dementia.To evaluate the effects of at least 12 weeks of computerised cognitive training (CCT) on maintaining or improving cognitive function and preventing dementia in people with mild cognitive impairment.We searched to 31 May 2018 in ALOIS (www.medicine.ox.ac.uk/alois) and ran additional searches in MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, ClinicalTrials.gov, and the WHO portal/ICTRP

2019 Cochrane

28. Association of Midlife Diet With Subsequent Risk for Dementia. (PubMed)

Association of Midlife Diet With Subsequent Risk for Dementia. Observational studies suggest that diet is linked to cognitive health. However, the duration of follow-up in many studies is not sufficient to take into account the long preclinical phase of dementia, and the evidence from interventional studies is not conclusive.To examine whether midlife diet is associated with subsequent risk for dementia.Population-based cohort study established in 1985-1988 that had dietary intake assessed (...) in 1991-1993, 1997-1999, and 2002-2004 and follow-up for incident dementia until March 31, 2017.Food frequency questionnaire to derive the Alternate Healthy Eating Index (AHEI), an 11-component diet quality score (score range, 0-110), with higher scores indicating a healthier diet.Incident dementia ascertained through linkage to electronic health records.Among 8225 participants without dementia in 1991-1993 (mean age, 50.2 years [SD, 6.1 years]; 5686 [69.1%] were men), a total of 344 cases of incident

2019 JAMA

29. AD-8 for detection of dementia across a variety of healthcare settings. (PubMed)

AD-8 for detection of dementia across a variety of healthcare settings. Dementia assessment often involves initial screening, using a brief tool, followed by more detailed assessment where required. The AD-8 is a short questionnaire, completed by a suitable 'informant' who knows the person well. AD-8 is designed to assess change in functional performance secondary to cognitive change.To determine the diagnostic accuracy of the informant-based AD-8 questionnaire, in detection of all-cause (...) (undifferentiated) dementia in adults. Where data were available, we described the following: the diagnostic accuracy of the AD-8 at various predefined threshold scores; the diagnostic accuracy of the AD-8 for each healthcare setting and the effects of heterogeneity on the reported diagnostic accuracy of the AD-8.We searched the following sources on 27 May 2014, with an update to 7 June 2018: ALOIS (Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group), MEDLINE (Ovid SP), Embase (Ovid SP), PsycINFO (Ovid SP

2019 Cochrane

30. Psychosocial interventions for pain management in older adults with dementia: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials

Psychosocial interventions for pain management in older adults with dementia: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials To assess the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions on pain in older adults living with dementia.A systematic review with meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.Scopus, ProQuest, EBSCO (CINAHL and MEDLINE), PubMed, OVID (PsycINFO), Web of Science, and Cochrane Library were searched from their inception up to 2 May 2018.Risk of bias assessment and meta (...) with dementia.Findings suggest that psychosocial interventions may be potentially effective alternatives for pain management in people with dementia. However, caution is needed in interpreting these results due to limited studies, risk of bias and heterogeneity across studies. Furthermore, well-designed research is needed on psychosocial interventions to strengthen quality of pain management in people with dementia.This review synthesized current evidence using psychosocial interventions to manage pain in people

2019 EvidenceUpdates

31. Goal-oriented cognitive rehabilitation for early-stage Alzheimer's and related dementias: the GREAT RCT

Goal-oriented cognitive rehabilitation for early-stage Alzheimer's and related dementias: the GREAT RCT Goal-oriented cognitive rehabilitation for early-stage Alzheimer's and related dementias: the GREAT RCT Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page from the navigation or try a website search above to find the information you need (...) . >> >> >> >> Issue {{metadata .Issue }} Toolkit 1)"> 0)"> 1)"> {{metadata.Title}} {{metadata.Headline}} Cognitive rehabilitation for people with early-stage dementia led to large positive effects for participant-rated goal attainment at 3 months and 9 months. {{author}} {{($index , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , & . Linda Clare 1, * , Aleksandra Kudlicka 1 , Jan R Oyebode 2 , Roy W Jones 3 , Antony Bayer 4 , Iracema Leroi 5 , Michael Kopelman 6 , Ian A James 7 , Alison Culverwell 8 , Jackie Pool 9 , Andrew

2019 NIHR HTA programme

32. Effectiveness of acupuncture for vascular cognitive impairment no dementia: a randomized controlled trial

Effectiveness of acupuncture for vascular cognitive impairment no dementia: a randomized controlled trial To evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture in patients with vascular cognitive impairment no dementia (VCIND) in comparison with citicoline, an agent for cognitive disturbances associated with chronic cerebral disorders.A randomized controlled multicenter trial.In three hospitals in Beijing, China.A total of 216 patients with VCIND were recruited.Patients with VCIND (mean age of 65.4

2019 EvidenceUpdates

33. Manual massage for persons living with dementia: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Manual massage for persons living with dementia: A systematic review and meta-analysis The number of persons living with dementia will increase. So far, pharmacological management is limited because of small effect sizes and side effects of the drugs. Therefore, it is important to assess non-pharmacological treatment options such as massage, which have nearly no side effects and are easy for caregivers to apply.To conduct a systematic review with meta-analysis, aiming to pool the evidence (...) for the efficacy of manual massage for persons living with dementia.A systematic review and meta-analysis.EMBASE, Medline, PubMed, PSYinfo, BIOSIS, EBM, PSYCINDEX, Osteopathic Research Web, and OSTMED.DR were searched, regardless of publication year, through August 2017.Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating manual massage in patients with dementia with or without using (aromatic) oil were included. The intervention of the control group had to guarantee no physical contact between caregiver and patient

2019 EvidenceUpdates

34. Traumatic Brain Injury and Dementia

Traumatic Brain Injury and Dementia 4 February 2019 Prepared for: Department of Veterans Affairs Veterans Health Administration Health Services Research & Development Service Washington, DC 20420 Prepared by: Evidence Synthesis Program (ESP) Coordinating Center Portland VA Health Care System Portland, OR Mark Helfand, MD, MPH, MS, Director Evidence Brief: Traumatic Brain Injury and Dementia Authors: Kim Peterson, MS Stephanie Veazie, MPH Donald Bourne, MPH Johanna Anderson, MPH Evidence (...) Synthesis Program 4 Evidence Brief: TBI and Dementia Evidence Synthesis Program i PREFACE The VA Evidence Synthesis Program (ESP) was established in 2007 to provide timely and accurate syntheses of targeted healthcare topics of importance to clinicians, managers, and policymakers as they work to improve the health and healthcare of Veterans. These reports help: · Develop clinical policies informed by evidence; · Implement effective services to improve patient outcomes and to support VA clinical practice

2019 Veterans Affairs Evidence-based Synthesis Program Reports

35. Development and Validation of a Dementia Risk Prediction Model in the General Population: An Analysis of Three Longitudinal Studies

Development and Validation of a Dementia Risk Prediction Model in the General Population: An Analysis of Three Longitudinal Studies Identification of individuals at high risk of dementia is essential for development of prevention strategies, but reliable tools are lacking for risk stratification in the population. The authors developed and validated a prediction model to calculate the 10-year absolute risk of developing dementia in an aging population.In a large, prospective population-based (...) cohort, data were collected on demographic, clinical, neuropsychological, genetic, and neuroimaging parameters from 2,710 nondemented individuals age 60 or older, examined between 1995 and 2011. A basic and an extended model were derived to predict 10-year risk of dementia while taking into account competing risks from death due to other causes. Model performance was assessed using optimism-corrected C-statistics and calibration plots, and the models were externally validated in the Dutch population

2019 EvidenceUpdates

36. Peri-operative care of people with dementia. Online Supporting Information

Peri-operative care of people with dementia. Online Supporting Information Online Supporting Information S1 Sources of further information S2 Quality assessment/quality improvement (QA/QI) toolkit S4 Abbey pain scale [90] S1 Sources of further information • Alzheimer’s Society, Royal College of Nursing. This is me. A support tool to enable person-centred care. This proforma can be completed pre- operatively by a person with cognitive impairment or their carers, to provide information (...) for hospital staff about how to care for that person when they are admitted for surgery. https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/download/downloads/id/3423/this_is_me.pdf (accessed 20/02/2018). • Alzheimer’s Society. Fix Dementia Care: Hospitals. January, 2016. This document describes the experiences of people with dementia admitted to hospital, and recommends care improvements that should be made. https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/download/downloads/id/2907/fix_dementia_care_- _hospitals.pdf (accessed 20/02/2018

2019 Association of Anaesthetists of GB and Ireland

37. Peri-operative care of people with dementia

Peri-operative care of people with dementia Guidelines Peri-operative care of people with dementia February 2019Guidelines Guidelinesfortheperi-operativecareofpeoplewithdementia GuidelinesfromtheAssociationofAnaesthetists S.White, 1 R.Grif?ths, 2 M.Baxter, 3 T.Beanland, 4 J.Cross, 5 J.Dhesi, 6 A.B.Docherty, 7 I.Foo, 8 G.Jolly, 9 J.Jones, 10 I.K.Moppett, 11 E.Plunkett 12 andK.Sachdev 13 1ConsultantAnaesthetist,RoyalSussexCountyHospital,Brighton,UKandco-Chair,AssociationofAnaesthetists (...) 13ConsultantinOlderAdultPsychiatry,HomertonUniversityHospitalNHSFoundationTrust,London,UK Summary Ageing populations have greater incidences of dementia. People with dementia present for emergency and, increasingly, elective surgery, but are poorly served by the lack of available guidance on their peri-operative management, particularly relating to pharmacological, medico-legal, environmental and attitudinal considerations. These guidelines seek to deliver such guidance, by providing information for peri-operative care

2019 Association of Anaesthetists of GB and Ireland

38. Antidepressants do not help treat depression in people living with dementia

Antidepressants do not help treat depression in people living with dementia Antidepressants do not help treat depression in dementia Discover Portal Discover Portal Antidepressants do not help treat depression in people living with dementia Published on 8 January 2019 doi: Antidepressants do not reduce symptoms of depression in people with dementia compared with placebo (dummy pills). Measured 6 to 13 weeks after starting the treatment, there is little or no difference in participants’ symptoms (...) , but an increased chance of unwanted side effects. The review did not identify enough data to determine if antidepressants have an effect in the longer-term. This Cochrane review included randomised controlled trials of any antidepressant drugs compared to placebo. Participants were aged 75 years on average, with mild or moderate dementia. The quality of the included trials was mixed, with not enough information reported to fully assess the risk of bias, though the main result is reliable. This review supports

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

39. Person-centred care improves quality of life for care home residents with dementia

Person-centred care improves quality of life for care home residents with dementia Person-centred care improves quality of life for care home residents with dementia Discover Portal Discover Portal Person-centred care improves quality of life for care home residents with dementia Published on 20 March 2018 doi: A person-centred care intervention for people with dementia living in care homes improved their quality of life, reduced agitation and improved interactions with staff. It may also save (...) to start with, which is in line with policy to limit use. It supports the feasibility of the intervention, but there is a need to understand which components are most effective and could be implemented on a wide scale with sustainable effects. Share your views on the research. Why was this study needed? Over 400,000 older people currently live in care homes in the UK. This includes over a third of the UK population with dementia. Many people with dementia have complex care needs that can affect

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

40. Coordinating care for people with long term conditions and dementia: room for improvement

Coordinating care for people with long term conditions and dementia: room for improvement Coordinating care for people with long term conditions and dementia: room for improvement Discover Portal Discover Portal Coordinating care for people with long term conditions and dementia: room for improvement Published on 26 May 2016 doi: New evidence shows that almost one fifth of people with dementia also have other serious conditions such as stroke, diabetes and visual impairment. Services (...) are not currently designed to provide adequate integrated care for people with dementia plus other conditions. For instance, people with dementia are less likely to get diabetes checks or cataract surgery than those without dementia. Carers are not routinely contacted, and there is a lack of guidance for health professionals covering more than one condition. Implications for practice include incorporating the impact of a diagnosis of dementia on pre-existing conditions into care planning. Second, professionals

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre