Latest & greatest articles for depression

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Top results for depression

61. Patient-controlled intravenous tramadol versus patient-controlled intravenous hydromorphone for analgesia after secondary cesarean delivery: a randomized controlled trial to compare analgesic, anti-anxiety and anti-depression effects

Patient-controlled intravenous tramadol versus patient-controlled intravenous hydromorphone for analgesia after secondary cesarean delivery: a randomized controlled trial to compare analgesic, anti-anxiety and anti-depression effects This study aimed to compare the postoperative analgesic effects of tramadol and hydromorphone for secondary cesarean delivery (CD) as well as their anti-anxiety and anti-depression properties.A total of 106 patients receiving secondary CD under spinal anesthesia (...) were randomly allocated to the tramadol group (n=53) and the hydromorphone group (n=53). Each group received patient-controlled intravenous analgesia using flurbiprofen 4 mg/kg combined with tramadol (4 mg/kg) or hydromorphone (0.04 mg/kg) immediately after the surgery. Postoperative pain numerical rating scale (NRS) for incision and visceral pain, hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS), early walking time and length of hospital stay were assessed.Patients in the tramadol and hydromorphone

2019 EvidenceUpdates

62. Combining mirtazapine with other antidepressants is not effective for treatment-resistant depression

Combining mirtazapine with other antidepressants is not effective for treatment-resistant depression Combining mirtazapine with other antidepressants is not effective for treatment-resistant depression Discover Portal Discover Portal Combining mirtazapine with other antidepressants is not effective for treatment-resistant depression Published on 15 January 2019 doi: Adding mirtazapine to first-line antidepressants for adults with treatment-resistant depression does not improve symptoms when (...) compared with placebo (dummy pills). People taking mirtazapine are more likely to experience side effects, and stop taking their treatment. This NIHR-funded trial took place in 106 general practices in England, recruiting 480 adults with mild to severe depression. All participants had been taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) antidepressants for at least six weeks but were still depressed. The findings show that this combination has

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

63. Antidepressants do not help treat depression in people living with dementia

Antidepressants do not help treat depression in people living with dementia Antidepressants do not help treat depression in dementia Discover Portal Discover Portal Antidepressants do not help treat depression in people living with dementia Published on 8 January 2019 doi: Antidepressants do not reduce symptoms of depression in people with dementia compared with placebo (dummy pills). Measured 6 to 13 weeks after starting the treatment, there is little or no difference in participants’ symptoms (...) the NICE guideline, which recommends that antidepressants are not routinely offered to people with dementia and depression, but that psychological treatments are considered instead. Share your views on the research. Why was this study needed? Dementia is a condition that includes memory loss, reasoning and communication difficulties, and changes in personality. It is progressive, so symptoms usually get worse. The most common types of dementia are Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia. The number

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

64. Aerobic exercise moderately reduces depressive symptoms in new mothers

Aerobic exercise moderately reduces depressive symptoms in new mothers Aerobic exercise moderately reduces depressive symptoms in new mothers Discover Portal Discover Portal Aerobic exercise moderately reduces depressive symptoms in new mothers Published on 21 November 2017 doi: For women who have had a baby in the past year, doing aerobic exercise can reduce the level of depressive symptoms they experience. This NIHR funded review of 13 studies showed that involving new mothers in group (...) exercise programmes, or advising them on an exercise of their choice, reduced depressive symptoms compared with usual care. The effect was moderate but significant. Examples of exercise were pram walks, with dietary advice from peers in some studies. The benefits were shown whether or not the mothers had postnatal depression. This evidence does have some limitations regarding its quality but is the best research currently available. This review should give additional confidence to health visitors

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

65. A primary care intervention helps older people with depression

A primary care intervention helps older people with depression A primary care intervention helps older people with depression Discover Portal Discover Portal A primary care intervention helps older people with depression Published on 23 January 2018 doi: Enhanced case management (also called collaborative care) added to primary care reduced symptoms in people with clinical depression, compared with usual primary care. The benefit was similar to other depression treatments. However, the small (...) not using the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies programme. It is possible that greater treatment duration of the number of sessions might lead to longer-term impacts. These results have contributed to the draft NICE depression guideline out for consultation in 2017. Those with physical health and mobility problems and other barriers to using services may especially benefit. Share your views on the research. Why was this study needed? About one in seven people over the age of 75 are clinically

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

66. Three psychological therapies are effective for adolescent depression

Three psychological therapies are effective for adolescent depression Three psychological therapies are effective for adolescent depression Discover Portal Discover Portal Three psychological therapies are effective for adolescent depression Published on 4 July 2017 doi: For adolescents with unipolar major depression, there was no difference in self-reported depressive symptoms or cost-effectiveness after 18 months for cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), short-term psychoanalytic psychotherapy (...) and brief psychological intervention. This was a large NIHR funded trial of three evidence-based psychological therapies often used in the NHS alongside medication or without it. Teenagers from various sites in the UK were randomly allocated to one of the three therapy types and some also given antidepressants if indicated. Uptake and attendance proved difficult, which may be an element for further research. Around a quarter had indication of unipolar major depression 18 months after treatment started

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

67. Collaborative care can be moderately effective at treating depression regardless of physical health status

Collaborative care can be moderately effective at treating depression regardless of physical health status Collaborative care can be moderately effective at treating depression regardless of physical health status Discover Portal Discover Portal Collaborative care can be moderately effective at treating depression regardless of physical health status Published on 21 February 2017 doi: Collaborative care can be moderately effective at treating depression compared to usual care, whether (...) or not people also have a long-term condition such as cancer or heart disease. Collaboration was provided by a case manager in primary care who was not a mental health professional. They coordinated a treatment plan with input from a GP and mental health professional. It is currently only recommended for people with depression and a long-term physical condition as prior to this review there was only consistent evidence of its effectiveness for people with both. This NIHR-funded review pooled individual

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

68. Two simple questions help GPs rule out depression

Two simple questions help GPs rule out depression Two simple questions help GPs rule out depression Discover Portal Discover Portal Two simple questions help GPs rule out depression Published on 23 March 2016 doi: The Whooley questions are useful for ruling out depression in that few people who answer no to both questions are depressed according to a ‘gold standard’ diagnostic interview. A positive screen is indicated by the person answering “yes” to one or both of the Whooley questions (...) and for these people the diagnostic interview will still be necessary to diagnose the condition. The two simple questions are; 1) have you felt down or depressed or hopeless? and 2) have you been bothered by little interest or pleasure in doing things? - in the past month. The questions are already recommended by NICE to identify people who may be at higher risk of depression, prior to further assessment. These people include those with long-term conditions and women before or after birth. Therefore

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

69. Antidepressants and talking therapies offer similar benefits for new-onset major depression

Antidepressants and talking therapies offer similar benefits for new-onset major depression Antidepressants and talking therapies offer similar benefits for new-onset major depression Discover Portal Discover Portal Antidepressants and talking therapies offer similar benefits for new-onset major depression Published on 23 March 2016 doi: This review found no difference in effectiveness or drop-out rates between antidepressants and cognitive behavioural therapy for adults recently diagnosed (...) with major depressive disorder. Both treatments should be offered, as recommended by NICE, either alone or possibly in combination, and the final decision will rely heavily on the patient’s preference. The challenge for talking therapies in the NHS has long been a lack of capacity. However, the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies programme has in the last few years provided thousands of trained therapists who can be accessed through GPs and in some cases directly. The trials included

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

70. Collaborative mental health care in the NHS has small but meaningful benefits for people with depression

Collaborative mental health care in the NHS has small but meaningful benefits for people with depression Collaborative mental health care in the NHS has small but meaningful benefits for people with depression Discover Portal Discover Portal Collaborative mental health care in the NHS has small but meaningful benefits for people with depression Published on 31 May 2016 doi: Collaborative care, that places a care manager in primary care to deliver treatment and coordinate care between GPs (...) and specialists, improved recovery of people with moderate to severe depression. Primary responsibility for prescribing remained with the GP. This large trial found that improvements were modest, but were similar to those found in an evaluation of the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies programme. The collaborative care model was cost-effective too. Collaborative care cost on average £272.50 per participant and had a cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) of £14,248, which is within NHS

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

71. One type of drug for depression during pregnancy may be linked to a small increase in pre-term births

One type of drug for depression during pregnancy may be linked to a small increase in pre-term births One type of drug for depression during pregnancy may be linked to a small increase in pre-term births Discover Portal Discover Portal One type of drug for depression during pregnancy may be linked to a small increase in pre-term births Published on 9 August 2016 doi: Women who are depressed during pregnancy and who take selective serotonin inhibitors (SSRIs) may be more likely to have a pre (...) -term birth than those who do not take SSRIs. Pre-term birth occurred in 6.8% of women with depression during pregnancy treated with SSRIs compared to 5.8% of depressed women who were treated with talking therapies alone. However, because this is a review of observational (cohort) studies rather than randomised controlled trials it is not possible to say that SSRIs cause pre-term birth. For example, it is possible that women who had worse depression were more likely to be prescribed SSRIs

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

72. Depression and anxiety common in people with heart disease

Depression and anxiety common in people with heart disease Depression and anxiety common in people with heart disease Discover Portal Discover Portal Depression and anxiety common in people with heart disease Published on 28 June 2016 doi: This multi-part NIHR study found that depression and anxiety were more common in people with coronary heart disease, than the general population. Anxiety increased people’s risk of a future heart attack. The people included in the study were generally older (...) , white males, so the findings may not apply to everyone. Patients considered a nurse-led intervention to personalise care was acceptable. The intervention included optimising medicines and facilitating referrals for psychological support. When asked, people with depression and coronary heart disease generally favoured non-medical treatments. These findings provide an insight into the scale of depression and anxiety amongst people with coronary heart disease. Overall costs of NHS care were increased

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

73. Guided online interventions can help people recover from depression

Guided online interventions can help people recover from depression Guided online interventions can help people recover from depression Discover Portal Discover Portal Guided online interventions can help people recover from depression Published on 6 November 2018 doi: Internet-based interventions combined with remote professional support can improve outcomes for people with depression. Those receiving the intervention show better initial response to treatment and higher recovery rates compared (...) with control groups who are either waiting for treatment or receiving less support. This meta-analysis shows people using guided internet therapy are over twice as likely to respond to treatment and achieve remission. This finding reinforces current NICE guidance which recommends this type of approach for mild to moderate depression. This type of treatment has the potential to reach more people than face to face therapy and provides more support than wholly self-directed interventions. It may help bridge

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

74. Simpler, cheaper therapy (behavioural activation) can be as good as CBT for treating depression

Simpler, cheaper therapy (behavioural activation) can be as good as CBT for treating depression Behavioural activation therapy can be as good as CBT for treating depression Discover Portal Discover Portal Simpler, cheaper therapy (behavioural activation) can be as good as CBT for treating depression Published on 5 October 2016 doi: A simpler therapy called behavioural activation can be as effective at treating adults with depression as cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). Also, it is delivered (...) more cheaply, by trained junior mental health workers. CBT is commonly provided to adults with depression and it is recommended by NICE as first- line treatment. However, it is complex to deliver and therapists are highly skilled and expensive. is a simpler type of talking therapy that encourages people to develop more positive behaviour such as planning activities and doing constructive things that they would usually avoid doing. We did not know if this therapy was as effective as CBT in treating

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

75. Aerobic exercise is an effective treatment for depression

Aerobic exercise is an effective treatment for depression Aerobic exercise is an effective treatment for depression Discover Portal Discover Portal Aerobic exercise is an effective treatment for depression Published on 22 January 2019 doi: A systematic review shows aerobic exercise improves clinically diagnosed major depression compared with antidepressants or treatment as usual. Previous reviews found conflicting evidence of benefit. The new review only included the trials thought to have (...) the most applicable results. This meant that trials recruiting people who might not have a clinical diagnosis of depression or through media adverts were not considered. Also, studies were only included if they featured aerobic exercise – walking, jogging or using cardiovascular gym equipment rather than other activities such as stretching. Exercise is already recommended as a low-intensity psychological intervention in national guidance. Though the review only included 11 trials of 455 adults

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

76. The effect of group exercises on balance, mobility, and depressive symptoms in older adults with mild cognitive impairment: a randomized controlled trial

The effect of group exercises on balance, mobility, and depressive symptoms in older adults with mild cognitive impairment: a randomized controlled trial To determine the effects of group exercises on balance, mobility, and depressive symptoms in community-dwelling older adults with mild cognitive impairment.Single blinded, randomized, matched pairs clinical trial.Four primary healthcare units.Fifty-two sedentary subjects with mild cognitive impairment were paired (age, sex, body mass index (...) , and Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination Revised score), tested, and then randomized into an intervention group ( n = 26) and a control group ( n = 26).The intervention group performed strength (ankle weights, elastic bands, and dumbbells) and aerobic exercises (walking) in their communities' public spaces, twice a week (60 minutes each), during 24 weeks. The control group maintained its usual routine.Balance (Berg Balance Scale (BBS)), mobility (Timed Up and Go Test (TUG)), and depressive symptoms (Geriatric

2019 EvidenceUpdates

77. Behavioral activation for depression: a meta-analysis

Behavioral activation for depression: a meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith

2019 PROSPERO

78. Cholesterol and triglyceride levels in first-episode patients with major depressive disorder: a meta-analysis of case-control studies

Cholesterol and triglyceride levels in first-episode patients with major depressive disorder: a meta-analysis of case-control studies Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record

2019 PROSPERO

79. Changes in brain function in patients with major depression treated with electroconvulsive therapy: systematic review of fMRI research

Changes in brain function in patients with major depression treated with electroconvulsive therapy: systematic review of fMRI research Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration

2019 PROSPERO

80. A systematic meta-review of predictors of response to psychotherapy in depression

A systematic meta-review of predictors of response to psychotherapy in depression Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email

2019 PROSPERO