Latest & greatest articles for epilepsy

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Top results for epilepsy

1. Brivaracetam add-on therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy. (PubMed)

Brivaracetam add-on therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy. Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders. It is estimated that up to 30% of patients with epilepsy continue to have epileptic seizures despite treatment with an antiepileptic drug. These patients are classified as drug-resistant and require treatment with a combination of multiple antiepileptic drugs. Brivaracetam is a third-generation antiepileptic drug that is a high-affinity ligand for synaptic vesicle protein 2A (...) . This review investigates the use of brivaracetam as add-on therapy for epilepsy.To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of brivaracetam when used as add-on treatment for people with drug-resistant epilepsy.We searched the following databases on 9 October 2018: the Cochrane Register of Studies (CRS Web), which includes the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); Medline (Ovid) 1946 to 8 October 2018; ClinicalTrials.gov; and the World

2019 Cochrane

2. Antiepileptic drugs as prophylaxis for de novo brain tumour-related epilepsy after craniotomy: a systematic review and meta-analysis of harm and benefits

Antiepileptic drugs as prophylaxis for de novo brain tumour-related epilepsy after craniotomy: a systematic review and meta-analysis of harm and benefits To investigate potential harm and benefits of antiepileptic drugs (AED) given prophylactically to prevent de novo brain tumour-related epilepsy after craniotomy.Randomised controlled trials (RCT) and retrospective studies published before 27 November 2018 were included. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (...) . This study suggests that prophylactic AED should not be administered to prevent brain tumour-related epilepsy after craniotomy.© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

2019 EvidenceUpdates

3. Cannabis derivative may reduce seizures in some severe drug-resistant epilepsies, but adverse events increase

Cannabis derivative may reduce seizures in some severe drug-resistant epilepsies, but adverse events increase Seizures may be reduced in some severe drug-resistant epilepsies by a cannabis derivative Discover Portal Discover Portal Cannabis derivative may reduce seizures in some severe drug-resistant epilepsies, but adverse events increase Published on 26 June 2018 doi: In people with some types of severe, drug-resistant epilepsy, adding cannabidiol to their treatment may reduce seizure (...) frequency and improve quality of life compared with a placebo. The likelihood of being free from seizures for more than a year was still low, about 8%. However, an additional 12% of people had serious adverse effects with cannabidiol. These findings come from a systematic review, which included six trials in 555 patients. Most were children and adolescents with rare forms of epilepsy, and findings may not apply to other forms of the condition. The included trials were poorly reported and show some bias

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

4. A range of anti-epilepsy drugs are effective as first-line treatment

A range of anti-epilepsy drugs are effective as first-line treatment A range of anti-epilepsy drugs are effective as first-line treatment Discover Portal Discover Portal A range of anti-epilepsy drugs are effective as first-line treatment Published on 12 September 2017 doi: Lamotrigine and levetiracetam are emerging as first-line treatments for epilepsy, which people may be more likely to keep taking than carbamazepine. Reducing the risk of adverse events and treatment withdrawal is important (...) when selecting an anti-epilepsy drug as it usually will need to be taken long-term. This study reviewed evidence on anti-epilepsy drugs in adults and children. The drugs were compared directly or indirectly with each other. The main outcome of interest was time to withdrawal from treatment, which indicates effectiveness and tolerability. The findings support NICE recommendations to use carbamazepine or lamotrigine as first-line therapies for epilepsy with partial seizures, with levetiracetam

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

5. Topiramate for juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. (PubMed)

Topiramate for juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. Topiramate is a newer broad-spectrum antiepileptic drug (AED). Some studies have shown the benefits of topiramate in the treatment of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME). However, there are no current systematic reviews to determine the efficacy and tolerability of topiramate in people with JME. This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2015, and last updated in 2017.To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of topiramate (...) in the treatment of JME.For the latest update, on 10 July 2018 we searched the Cochrane Register of Studies (CRS Web), which includes the Cochrane Epilepsy Group's Specialized Register and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (Ovid 1946- ), and ClinicalTrials.gov. We also searched ongoing trials registers, reference lists and relevant conference proceedings, and contacted study authors and pharmaceutical companies.We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating

2019 Cochrane

6. Epilepsy in adults. (PubMed)

Epilepsy in adults. Epilepsy is one of the most common serious brain conditions, affecting over 70 million people worldwide. Its incidence has a bimodal distribution with the highest risk in infants and older age groups. Progress in genomic technology is exposing the complex genetic architecture of the common types of epilepsy, and is driving a paradigm shift. Epilepsy is a symptom complex with multiple risk factors and a strong genetic predisposition rather than a condition with a single (...) expression and cause. These advances have resulted in the new classification of epileptic seizures and epilepsies. A detailed clinical history and a reliable eyewitness account of a seizure are the cornerstones of the diagnosis. Ancillary investigations can help to determine cause and prognosis. Advances in brain imaging are helping to identify the structural and functional causes and consequences of the epilepsies. Comorbidities are increasingly recognised as important aetiological and prognostic

2019 Lancet

7. Surgical outcomes for medically intractable epilepsy in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Surgical outcomes for medically intractable epilepsy in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis OBJECTIVEThe aim of this study was to describe the current state of epilepsy surgery and establish estimates of seizure outcomes following surgery for medically intractable epilepsy (MIE) in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs).METHODSThe MEDLINE and Embase databases were searched without publication date restriction. This search was supplemented by a manual screen (...) of key epilepsy and neurosurgical journals (January 2005 to December 2016). Studies that reported outcomes for at least 10 patients of any age undergoing surgery for MIE in LMICs over a defined follow-up period were included. A meta-analysis with a random-effects model was performed in accordance with the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) statement and MOOSE (Meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) guidelines. Pooled estimates of seizure

2019 EvidenceUpdates

8. A Prediction Model to Determine Childhood Epilepsy After 1 or More Paroxysmal Events

A Prediction Model to Determine Childhood Epilepsy After 1 or More Paroxysmal Events The clinical profile of children who had possible seizures is heterogeneous, and accuracy of diagnostic testing is limited. We aimed to develop and validate a prediction model that determines the risk of childhood epilepsy by combining available information at first consultation.We retrospectively collected data of 451 children who visited our outpatient department for diagnostic workup related to 1 or more (...) paroxysmal event(s). At least 1 year of follow-up was available for all children who were diagnosed with epilepsy or in whom diagnosis remained inconclusive. Clinical characteristics (sex, age of first seizure, event description, medical history) and EEG report were used as predictor variables for building a multivariate logistic regression model. Performance was validated in an external cohort (n = 187).Model discrimination was excellent, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve

2019 EvidenceUpdates

9. Brivaracetam (Briviact) for use in the treatment of patients with refractory epilepsy

Brivaracetam (Briviact) for use in the treatment of patients with refractory epilepsy Brivaracetam (Briviact ® ). Reference number 3387. Page 1 of 3 AWMSG Secretariat Assessment Report – Limited submission Brivaracetam (Briviact ® ? ) 10 mg, 25 mg, 50 mg, 75 mg and 100 mg film-coated tablets; 10 mg/ml oral solution; 10 mg/ml solution for injection/infusion Company: UCB Pharma Ltd Licensed indication under consideration: As adjunctive therapy in the treatment of partial onset seizures (...) with or without secondary generalisation in children from 4 to = 15 years of age with epilepsy. Brivaracetam (Briviact ® ) should be restricted to use in the treatment of patients with refractory epilepsy, who remain uncontrolled with, or are intolerant to, other adjunctive anti-epileptic medicines. ? This medicinal product is subject to additional monitoring. This will allow quick identification of new safety information. Healthcare professionals are asked to report any suspected adverse reactions. Date

2019 All Wales Medicines Strategy Group

10. Math and numeracy skills in epilepsy: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Math and numeracy skills in epilepsy: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email

2019 PROSPERO

11. The prevalence of comorbidity in epilepsy: a systematic review and meta-analysis

The prevalence of comorbidity in epilepsy: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email

2019 PROSPERO

12. Vitamin E as add-on therapy for epilepsy: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Vitamin E as add-on therapy for epilepsy: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email

2019 PROSPERO

13. Treatment of epilepsy for people with Alzheimer's disease. (PubMed)

Treatment of epilepsy for people with Alzheimer's disease. Any type of seizure can be observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Antiepileptic drugs seem to prevent the recurrence of epileptic seizures in most people with AD. There are pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for epilepsy in people with AD. There are no current systematic reviews to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of these treatments; this review aims to review those different modalities. This is an updated version (...) of the original Cochrane Review published in Issue 11, 2016.To assess the efficacy and tolerability of pharmacological or non-pharmacological interventions for the treatment of epilepsy in people with AD (including sporadic AD and dominantly inherited AD).For the latest update, on 10 July 2018 we searched the Cochrane Register of Studies (CRS Web), which includes the Cochrane Epilepsy Group's Specialized Register and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (Ovid 1946

2018 Cochrane

14. Nomograms to predict naming decline after temporal lobe surgery in adults with epilepsy

Nomograms to predict naming decline after temporal lobe surgery in adults with epilepsy To develop and externally validate models to predict the probability of postoperative naming decline in adults following temporal lobe epilepsy surgery using easily accessible preoperative clinical predictors.In this retrospective, prediction model development study, multivariable models were developed in a cohort of 719 patients who underwent temporal lobe epilepsy surgery at Cleveland Clinic and externally (...) validated in a cohort of 138 patients who underwent temporal lobe surgery at one of 3 epilepsy surgery centers in the United States (Columbia University Medical Center, Emory University School of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine).The development cohort was 54% female with an average age at surgery of 36 years (SD 12). Twenty-six percent of this cohort experienced clinically relevant postoperative naming decline. The model included 5 variables: side of surgery, age at epilepsy onset

2018 EvidenceUpdates

15. Ketogenic diets for drug-resistant epilepsy. (PubMed)

Ketogenic diets for drug-resistant epilepsy. Ketogenic diets (KDs), being high in fat and low in carbohydrates, have been suggested to reduce seizure frequency in people with epilepsy. At present, such diets are mainly recommended for children who continue to have seizures despite treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) (drug-resistant epilepsy). Recently, there has been interest in less restrictive KDs, including the modified Atkins diet (MAD), and the use of these diets has extended (...) into adult practice. This is an update of a review first published in 2003 and last updated in 2016.To assess the effects of KDs for drug-resistant epilepsy by reviewing the evidence from randomised controlled trials.For the latest update we searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group's Specialized Register (11 April 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) via the Cochrane Register of Studies Online (CRSO, 11 April 2017), MEDLINE (Ovid, 11 April 2017), ClinicalTrials.gov (11 April

2018 Cochrane

16. Perampanel (epilepsy) - Benefit assessment according to §35a Social Code Book (SGB) V

Perampanel (epilepsy) - Benefit assessment according to §35a Social Code Book (SGB) V Extract 1 Translation of Sections 2.1 to 2.6 of the dossier assessment Perampanel (Epilepsie) – Nutzenbewertung gemäß § 35a SGB V (Version 1.0; Status: 26 February 2018). Please note: This translation is provided as a service by IQWiG to English-language readers. However, solely the German original text is absolutely authoritative and legally binding. IQWiG Reports – Commission No. A17-61 Perampanel (epilepsy (...) ) – Benefit assessment according to §35a Social Code Book V 1 Extract of dossier assessment A17-61 Version 1.0 Perampanel (epilepsy) 26 February 2018 Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) - i - Publishing details Publisher: Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care Topic: Perampanel (epilepsy) – Benefit assessment according to §35a Social Code Book V Commissioning agency: Federal Joint Committee Commission awarded on: 30 November 2017 Internal Commission No.: A17-61 Address

2018 Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Healthcare (IQWiG)

17. Subpial transection surgery for epilepsy. (PubMed)

Subpial transection surgery for epilepsy. Nearly 30% of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures despite using several antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Such patients are regarded as having refractory, or uncontrolled, epilepsy. While there is no universally accepted definition of uncontrolled, or medically refractory, epilepsy, for the purposes of this review we will consider seizures as drug resistant if they have failed to respond to a minimum of two AEDs. Specialists consider that early (...) surgical intervention may prevent seizures at a younger age, which in turn may improve the intellectual and social status of children. Many types of surgery are available for treating refractory epilepsy; one such procedure is known as subpial transection.To assess the effects of subpial transection for focal-onset seizures and generalised tonic-clonic seizures in children and adults.For the latest update we searched the following databases on 7 August 2018: the Cochrane Register of Studies (CRS Web

2018 Cochrane

18. Gabapentin add-on treatment for drug-resistant focal epilepsy. (PubMed)

Gabapentin add-on treatment for drug-resistant focal epilepsy. This is an updated version of the Cochrane Review previously published in 2013.Most people with epilepsy have a good prognosis and their seizures are well controlled by a single antiepileptic drug, but up to 30% develop drug-resistant epilepsy, especially those with focal seizures. In this review, we summarised the evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of gabapentin, when used as an add-on treatment for drug-resistant (...) focal epilepsy.To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of gabapentin when used as an add-on treatment for people with drug-resistant focal epilepsy.For the latest update, we searched the Cochrane Register of Studies (CRS Web, 20 March 2018), which includes the Cochrane Epilepsy Group's Specialized Register and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to 20 March 2018), ClinicalTrials.gov (20 March 2018) and the World Health Organization International

2018 Cochrane

19. Carbamazepine versus phenobarbitone monotherapy for epilepsy: an individual participant data review. (PubMed)

Carbamazepine versus phenobarbitone monotherapy for epilepsy: an individual participant data review. This is an updated version of the Cochrane Review previously published in 2016. This review is one in a series of Cochrane Reviews investigating pair-wise monotherapy comparisons.Epilepsy is a common neurological condition in which abnormal electrical discharges from the brain cause recurrent unprovoked seizures. It is believed that with effective drug treatment, up to 70% of individuals (...) with active epilepsy have the potential to become seizure-free and go into long-term remission shortly after starting drug therapy with a single antiepileptic drug in monotherapy.Worldwide, carbamazepine and phenobarbitone are commonly used broad-spectrum antiepileptic drugs, suitable for most epileptic seizure types. Carbamazepine is a current first-line treatment for focal onset seizures, and is used in the USA and Europe. Phenobarbitone is no longer considered a first-line treatment because of concerns

2018 Cochrane

20. Oxcarbazepine versus phenytoin monotherapy for epilepsy: an individual participant data review. (PubMed)

Oxcarbazepine versus phenytoin monotherapy for epilepsy: an individual participant data review. This is an updated version of the Cochrane Review previously published in 2013. This review is one in a series of Cochrane Reviews investigating pair-wise monotherapy comparisons.Epilepsy is a common neurological condition in which abnormal electrical discharges from the brain cause recurrent unprovoked seizures. It is believed that with effective drug treatment, up to 70% of individuals with active (...) epilepsy have the potential to become seizure-free and go into long-term remission shortly after starting drug therapy with a single antiepileptic drug in monotherapy.Worldwide, phenytoin is a commonly used antiepileptic drug. It is important to know how newer drugs, such as oxcarbazepine, compare with commonly used standard treatments.To review the time to treatment failure, remission and first seizure with oxcarbazepine compared to phenytoin, when used as monotherapy in people with focal onset

2018 Cochrane