Latest & greatest articles for epilepsy

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This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on epilepsy and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Top results for epilepsy

81. Systematic review and network meta-analysis of resective surgery for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy Full Text available with Trip Pro

Systematic review and network meta-analysis of resective surgery for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy To evaluate the effectiveness of anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) versus selective amygdalohippocampectomy (SAH) on seizure-free outcome in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, using both direct and indirect evidence from the literature.MEDLINE, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched for original research articles and systematic reviews comparing ATL versus SAH, and ATL or SAH versus

2018 EvidenceUpdates

82. Cognitive-behavioural therapy does not meaningfully reduce depression in most people with epilepsy: a systematic review of clinically reliable improvement Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cognitive-behavioural therapy does not meaningfully reduce depression in most people with epilepsy: a systematic review of clinically reliable improvement Psychological treatment is recommended for depression and anxiety in those with epilepsy. This review used standardised criteria to evaluate, for the first time, the clinical relevance of any symptom change these treatments afford patients. Databases were searched until March 2017 for relevant trials in adults. Trial quality was assessed (...) randomised to CBT. The extent of gain was though low-the depressive symptoms of most participants (66.9%) receiving CBT were 'unchanged' and 2.7% 'reliably deteriorated'. Only 30.4% made a 'reliable improvement. This compares with 10.2% of participants in the control arms who 'reliably improved' without intervention. The effect of the treatments on secondary outcome measures, including anxiety, was also low. Existing CBT treatments appear to have limited benefit for depression symptoms in epilepsy

2018 EvidenceUpdates

83. Practice guideline update summary: Efficacy and tolerability of the new antiepileptic drugs I: Treatment of new-onset epilepsy: Report of the Guideline Development, Dissemination, and Implementation Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and th Full Text available with Trip Pro

Practice guideline update summary: Efficacy and tolerability of the new antiepileptic drugs I: Treatment of new-onset epilepsy: Report of the Guideline Development, Dissemination, and Implementation Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and th To update the 2004 American Academy of Neurology (AAN) guideline for treating new-onset focal or generalized epilepsy with second- and third-generation antiepileptic drugs (AEDs).The 2004 AAN criteria were used to systematically review (...) literature (January 2003-November 2015), classify pertinent studies according to the therapeutic rating scheme, and link recommendations to evidence strength.Several second-generation AEDs are effective for new-onset focal epilepsy. Data are lacking on efficacy in new-onset generalized tonic-clonic seizures, juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, or juvenile absence epilepsy, and on efficacy of third-generation AEDs in new-onset epilepsy.Lamotrigine (LTG) should (Level B) and levetiracetam (LEV) and zonisamide

2018 EvidenceUpdates

84. Practice guideline update summary: Efficacy and tolerability of the new antiepileptic drugs II: Treatment-resistant epilepsy: Report of the Guideline Development, Dissemination, and Implementation Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the Full Text available with Trip Pro

Practice guideline update summary: Efficacy and tolerability of the new antiepileptic drugs II: Treatment-resistant epilepsy: Report of the Guideline Development, Dissemination, and Implementation Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the To update the 2004 American Academy of Neurology guideline for managing treatment-resistant (TR) epilepsy with second- and third-generation antiepileptic drugs (AEDs).2004 criteria were used to systemically review literature (January 2003 (...) to November 2015), classify pertinent studies according to the therapeutic rating scheme, and link recommendations to evidence strength.Forty-two articles were included.The following are established as effective to reduce seizure frequency (Level A): immediate-release pregabalin and perampanel for TR adult focal epilepsy (TRAFE); vigabatrin for TRAFE (not first-line treatment); rufinamide for Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) (add-on therapy). The following should be considered to decrease seizure frequency

2018 EvidenceUpdates

85. Lamotrigine versus carbamazepine monotherapy for epilepsy: an individual participant data review. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Lamotrigine versus carbamazepine monotherapy for epilepsy: an individual participant data review. This is an updated version of the original Cochrane Review published in Issue 11, 2006 of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.Epilepsy is a common neurological condition in which abnormal electrical discharges from the brain cause recurrent unprovoked seizures. It is believed that with effective drug treatment up to 70% of individuals with active epilepsy have the potential to become (...) and secondarily generalised) or generalised onset tonic-clonic seizures (with or without other generalised seizure types).We conducted the first searches for this review in 1997. For the most recent update, we searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) via the Cochrane Register of Studies Online (CRSO), MEDLINE, Clinical Trials.gov and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform on 26 February 2018, without language

2018 Cochrane

86. Practice Guideline Update Summary: Efficacy and Tolerability of the New Antiepileptic Drugs I: Treatment of New-onset Epilepsy

Practice Guideline Update Summary: Efficacy and Tolerability of the New Antiepileptic Drugs I: Treatment of New-onset Epilepsy AAN.com ©2018 American Academy of Neurology AAN and AES Summary of Practice Guideline for Clinicians Practice Guideline Update: Efficacy and Tolerability of the New Antiepileptic Drugs I: Treatment of New-onset Epilepsy This is a summary of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and American Epilepsy Society (AES) practice guideline, “Practice guideline update (...) : Efficacy and tolerability of the new antiepileptic drugs I: Treatment of new-onset epilepsy,” which was published online ahead of print in Neurology ® on June 13, 2018. It will appear in the July 10, 2018, print issue. Please refer to the full guideline at AAN.com/guidelines for more information, including full descriptions of the processes for classifying evidence, deriving conclusions, and making recommendations. For adults and children with newly diagnosed epilepsy, are the following drugs effective

2018 American Academy of Neurology

87. Practice Guideline Update Summary: Efficacy and Tolerability of the New Antiepileptic Drugs II: Treatment-resistant Epilepsy

Practice Guideline Update Summary: Efficacy and Tolerability of the New Antiepileptic Drugs II: Treatment-resistant Epilepsy AAN.com ©2018 American Academy of Neurology AAN and AES Summary of Practice Guideline for Clinicians Practice Guideline Update: Efficacy and Tolerability of the New Antiepileptic Drugs II: Treatment-resistant Epilepsy This is a summary of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and American Epilepsy Society (AES) practice guideline, “Practice guideline update: Efficacy (...) and tolerability of the new antiepileptic drugs I: Treatment of new-onset epilepsy,” which was published online ahead of print in Neurology ® on June 13, 2018. It will appear in the July 10, 2018, print issue. Please refer to the full guideline at AAN.com/guidelines for more information, including descriptions of the processes for classifying evidence, deriving conclusions, and making recommendations. For adult patients with treatment-resistant (TR) focal epilepsy, are these antiepileptic drugs (AEDs

2018 American Academy of Neurology

88. Eslicarbazepine acetate (Zebinix) - treatment of partial-onset seizures, with or without secondary generalisation, in adults with newly diagnosed epilepsy

Eslicarbazepine acetate (Zebinix) - treatment of partial-onset seizures, with or without secondary generalisation, in adults with newly diagnosed epilepsy Non Submission eslicarbazepine acetate 200mg and 800mg tablets (Zebinix ® ) SMC2090 Eisai Ltd 4 May 2018 ADVICE: in the absence of a submission from the holder of the marketing authorisation eslicarbazepine acetate (Zebinix ® ) is not recommended for use within NHS Scotland. Indication under review: As monotherapy in the treatment of partial (...) -onset seizures, with or without secondary generalisation, in adults with newly diagnosed epilepsy. The holder of the marketing authorisation has not made a submission to SMC regarding this product in this setting. As a result we cannot recommend its use within NHSScotland. Advice context: No part of this advice may be used without the whole of the advice being quoted in full. This advice represents the view of the Scottish Medicines Consortium. It is provided to inform the considerations of Area

2018 Scottish Medicines Consortium

89. Incorporating epilepsy genetics into clinical practice: a 360°evaluation Full Text available with Trip Pro

Incorporating epilepsy genetics into clinical practice: a 360°evaluation We evaluated a new epilepsy genetic diagnostic and counseling service covering a UK population of 3.5 million. We calculated diagnostic yield, estimated clinical impact, and surveyed referring clinicians and families. We costed alternative investigational pathways for neonatal onset epilepsy. Patients with epilepsy of unknown aetiology onset < 2 years; treatment resistant epilepsy; or familial epilepsy were referred (...) for counseling and testing. We developed NGS panels, performing clinical interpretation with a multidisciplinary team. We held an educational workshop for paediatricians and nurses. We sent questionnaires to referring paediatricians and families. We analysed investigation costs for 16 neonatal epilepsy patients. Of 96 patients, a genetic diagnosis was made in 34% of patients with seizure onset < 2 years, and 4% > 2 years, with turnaround time of 21 days. Pathogenic variants were seen in SCN8A, SCN2A, SCN1A

2018 NPJ genomic medicine

90. Stiripentol add-on therapy for focal refractory epilepsy. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Stiripentol add-on therapy for focal refractory epilepsy. This is an updated version of the Cochrane review last published in 2015 (Issue 10). For nearly 30% of people with epilepsy, seizures are not controlled by current treatments. Stiripentol is a new antiepileptic drug (AED) that was developed in France and was approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in 2007 for the treatment of Dravet syndrome as an adjunctive therapy with valproate and clobazam, with promising effects.To evaluate (...) the efficacy and tolerability of stiripentol as add-on treatment for people with focal refractory epilepsy who are taking AEDs.For the latest update, we searched the following databases on 21 August 2017: Cochrane Epilepsy Specialized Register, CENTRAL , MEDLINE, ClinicalTrials.gov, and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP). We contacted Biocodex (the manufacturer of stiripentol) and epilepsy experts to identify published, unpublished and ongoing trials.Randomised, controlled, add

2018 Cochrane

91. Exploring the perception of women with epilepsy about pregnancy concerns: a qualitative study Full Text available with Trip Pro

Exploring the perception of women with epilepsy about pregnancy concerns: a qualitative study Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder in pregnancy, which is associated with increased maternal and fetal adverse outcomes. This study aimed to explore the reproductive healthcare needs of women with epilepsy before, during and after childbirth.This was a qualitative study using a content analysis method. The study population was marital women with epilepsy in reproductive age (15-45 years (...) for women with epilepsy, (2) doubt about the advantages and disadvantages of breastfeeding, (3) stigma as a block to the treatment of the postpartum depression, and (4) playing the motherhood role under the shadow of self-esteem to lack of self-esteem.In the prenatal, natal and postnatal duration, because of supportive system disruption and not receiving proper consultation, participants were often worried about not being able to get favorable conditions for safe pregnancy and controlling process

2018 Electronic physician

92. Clonazepam add-on therapy for refractory epilepsy in adults and children. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Clonazepam add-on therapy for refractory epilepsy in adults and children. Epilepsy affects about 50 million people worldwide, nearly a quarter of whom have drug-refractory epilepsy. People with drug-refractory epilepsy have increased risks of premature death, injuries, psychosocial dysfunction, and a reduced quality of life.To assess the efficacy and tolerability of clonazepam when used as an add-on therapy for adults and children with refractory focal onset or generalised onset epileptic (...) seizures, when compared with placebo or another antiepileptic agent.We searched the following databases on 14 September 2017: Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) via the Cochrane Register of Studies Online (CRSO), MEDLINE (Ovid 1946 to 14 September 2017), ClinicalTrials.gov, and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP).Double-blind randomised controlled studies of add-on clonazepam in people with refractory focal

2018 Cochrane

93. Self-Management education for adults with poorly controlled epILEpsy [SMILE (UK)]: a randomised controlled trial

Self-Management education for adults with poorly controlled epILEpsy [SMILE (UK)]: a randomised controlled trial Self-Management education for adults with poorly controlled epILEpsy [SMILE (UK)]: a randomised controlled trial Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page from the navigation or try a website search above to find (...) the information you need. >> >> >> >> Issue {{metadata .Issue }} Toolkit 1)"> 0)"> 1)"> {{metadata.Title}} {{metadata.Headline}} For adults with epilepsy and persistent seizures, a 2-day group course increased their self-confidence, but did not change their quality of life 12 months later. {{author}} {{($index , , , , , , , , , , , , & . Leone Ridsdale 1, * , Alison McKinlay 1 , Gabriella Wojewodka 1 , Emily J Robinson 2 , Iris Mosweu 3 , Sarah J Feehan 1 , Adam J Noble 4 , Myfanwy Morgan 5 , Stephanie J C

2018 NIHR HTA programme

94. Epilepsy in Children After Pandemic Influenza Vaccination Full Text available with Trip Pro

Epilepsy in Children After Pandemic Influenza Vaccination To determine if pandemic influenza vaccination was associated with an increased risk of epilepsy in children.Information from Norwegian registries from 2006 through 2014 on all children <18 years living in Norway on October 1, 2009 was used in Cox regression models to estimate hazard ratios for incident epilepsy after vaccination. A self-controlled case series analysis was used to estimate incidence rate ratios in defined risk periods (...) after pandemic vaccination.In Norway, the main period of the influenza A subtype H1N1 pandemic was from October 2009 to December 2009. On October 1, 2009, 1 154 113 children <18 years of age were registered as residents in Norway. Of these, 572 875 (50.7%) were vaccinated against pandemic influenza. From October 2009 through 2014 there were 3628 new cases of epilepsy (incidence rate 6.09 per 10 000 person-years). The risk of epilepsy was not increased after vaccination: hazard ratio: 1.07; 95

2018 EvidenceUpdates

95. Rufinamide add-on therapy for refractory epilepsy. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Rufinamide add-on therapy for refractory epilepsy. Epilepsy is a central nervous system disorder (neurological disorder). Epileptic seizures are the result of excessive and abnormal cortical nerve cell electrical activity in the brain. Despite the development of more than 10 new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) since the early 2000s, approximately a third of people with epilepsy remain resistant to pharmacotherapy, often requiring treatment with a combination of AEDs. In this review, we summarised (...) the current evidence regarding rufinamide, a novel anticonvulsant medication, which, as a triazole derivative, is structurally unrelated to any other currently used anticonvulsant medication, when used as an add-on treatment for refractory epilepsy. In January 2009, rufinamide was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of children four years of age and older with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. It is also approved as an add-on treatment for adults and adolescents with focal seizures.To

2018 Cochrane

96. A range of anti-epilepsy drugs are effective as first-line treatment

A range of anti-epilepsy drugs are effective as first-line treatment A range of anti-epilepsy drugs are effective as first-line treatment Discover Portal Discover Portal A range of anti-epilepsy drugs are effective as first-line treatment Published on 12 September 2017 doi: Lamotrigine and levetiracetam are emerging as first-line treatments for epilepsy, which people may be more likely to keep taking than carbamazepine. Reducing the risk of adverse events and treatment withdrawal is important (...) when selecting an anti-epilepsy drug as it usually will need to be taken long-term. This study reviewed evidence on anti-epilepsy drugs in adults and children. The drugs were compared directly or indirectly with each other. The main outcome of interest was time to withdrawal from treatment, which indicates effectiveness and tolerability. The findings support NICE recommendations to use carbamazepine or lamotrigine as first-line therapies for epilepsy with partial seizures, with levetiracetam

2018 NIHR Dissemination Centre

97. Evidence for cannabis and cannabinoids for epilepsy: a systematic review of controlled and observational evidence Full Text available with Trip Pro

Evidence for cannabis and cannabinoids for epilepsy: a systematic review of controlled and observational evidence Review evidence for cannabinoids as adjunctive treatments for treatment-resistant epilepsy. Systematic search of Medline, Embase and PsycINFO was conducted in October 2017. Outcomes were: 50%+ seizure reduction, complete seizure freedom; improved quality of life (QoL). Tolerability/safety were assessed by study withdrawals, adverse events (AEs) and serious adverse events (SAEs (...) % (95% CI 3.8% to 14.5%) were seizure-free. Twelve observational studies reported improved QoL (55.8%, 95% CI 40.5 to 70.6); 50.6% (95% CI 31.7 to 69.4) AEs and 2.2% (95% CI 0 to 7.9) SAEs. Pharmaceutical-grade CBD as adjuvant treatment in paediatric-onset drug-resistant epilepsy may reduce seizure frequency. Existing RCT evidence is mostly in paediatric samples with rare and severe epilepsy syndromes; RCTs examining other syndromes and cannabinoids are needed.CRD42017055412.© Article author(s

2018 EvidenceUpdates

98. Epilepsy, antiepileptic drugs, and serious transport accidents: A nationwide cohort study Full Text available with Trip Pro

Epilepsy, antiepileptic drugs, and serious transport accidents: A nationwide cohort study To investigate the association between epilepsy and antiepileptic drugs and serious transport accidents requiring emergency care or resulting in death.We identified 29,220 individuals 18 years or older with epilepsy without cerebral palsy or intellectual disability and 267,637 matched controls using Swedish registers. This nationwide cohort was followed from 2006 to 2013 for serious transport accidents. We (...) used Cox regression to analyze the risk of serious transport accidents between individuals with epilepsy and matched controls, and then stratified Cox regression to compare the risk during periods of medication with the risk during nonmedication period within the same individual with epilepsy. We adjusted for civil status, employment, education, living area, psychiatric disorders prior to the start of follow-up, and psychotropic medication.Compared to matched controls, individuals with epilepsy

2018 EvidenceUpdates

99. Cardiac arrhythmia and neuroexcitability gene variants in resected brain tissue from patients with sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cardiac arrhythmia and neuroexcitability gene variants in resected brain tissue from patients with sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the leading cause of epilepsy-related mortality in young adults. The exact mechanisms are unknown but death often follows a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. Proposed mechanisms include seizure-related respiratory, cardiac, autonomic, and arousal dysfunction. Genetic drivers underlying SUDEP risk are largely (...) unknown. To identify potential SUDEP risk genes, we compared whole-exome sequences (WES) derived from formalin-fixed paraffin embedded surgical brain specimens of eight epilepsy patients who died from SUDEP with seven living controls matched for age at surgery, sex, year of surgery and lobe of resection. We compared identified variants from both groups filtering known polymorphisms from publicly available data as well as scanned for epilepsy and candidate SUDEP genes. In the SUDEP cohort, we

2018 NPJ genomic medicine

100. Variant Intestinal-Cell Kinase in Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Variant Intestinal-Cell Kinase in Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy. In juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, data are limited on the genetic basis of networks promoting convulsions with diffuse polyspikes on electroencephalography (EEG) and the subtle microscopic brain dysplasia called microdysgenesis.Using Sanger sequencing, we sequenced the exomes of six members of a large family affected with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and confirmed cosegregation in all 37 family members. We screened an additional 310 (...) in mice lacking a copy of Ick.A variant, K305T (c.914A→C), cosegregated with epilepsy or polyspikes on EEG in 12 members of the family affected with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. We identified 21 pathogenic ICK variants in 22 of 310 additional patients (7%). Four strongly linked variants (K220E, K305T, A615T, and R632X) impaired mitosis, cell-cycle exit, and radial neuroblast migration while promoting apoptosis. Tonic-clonic convulsions and polyspikes on EEG resembling seizures in human juvenile

2018 NEJM