Latest & greatest articles for epilepsy

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Top results for epilepsy

161. Stiripentol for focal refractory epilepsy. (PubMed)

Stiripentol for focal refractory epilepsy. This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in 2014 (Issue 1). For nearly 30% of people with epilepsy, seizures are not controlled by current treatments. Stiripentol is a new antiepileptic drug (AED) that was developed in France and was approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in 2007 for the treatment of Dravet syndrome as adjunctive therapy with valproate and clobazam, with promising effects.To evaluate the efficacy (...) and tolerability of stiripentol as add-on treatment for patients with focal refractory epilepsy who are taking AEDs.We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialised Register (10 August 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; August 2015, Issue 8)and MEDLINE (Ovid) (1946 to 10 August 2015). We contacted Biocodex (the manufacturer of stiripentol) and epilepsy experts to identify published, unpublished and ongoing trials.Randomised controlled add-on trials of stiripentol in patients

2015 Cochrane

162. Antiepileptic drugs for the treatment of infants with severe myoclonic epilepsy. (PubMed)

Antiepileptic drugs for the treatment of infants with severe myoclonic epilepsy. This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 11, 2013.Severe myoclonic epilepsy in infants (SMEI), also known as Dravet syndrome, is a rare, refractory form of epilepsy, for which stiripentol (STP) has been recently licensed as add-on therapy.To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of STP and other antiepileptic drug treatments (including ketogenic diet) for patients with SMEI.We (...) searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialised Register (27 April 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 27 April 2015) and MEDLINE (1946 to 27 April 2015). We systematically searched the online trials registry ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform and the bibliographies of identified studies for additional references. We handsearched selected journals and conference proceedings and imposed no language

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2015 Cochrane

163. Non-pharmacological interventions for people with epilepsy and intellectual disabilities. (PubMed)

Non-pharmacological interventions for people with epilepsy and intellectual disabilities. Approximately 30% of patients with epilepsy remain refractory to drug treatment and continue to experience seizures whilst taking one or more antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Several non-pharmacological interventions that may be used in conjunction with or as an alternative to AEDs are available for refractory patients. In view of the fact that seizures in people with intellectual disabilities are often complex (...) and refractory to pharmacological interventions, it is evident that good quality randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are needed to assess the efficacy of alternatives or adjuncts to pharmacological interventions.This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review (Beavis 2007) published in The Cochrane Library (2007, Issue 4).To assess data derived from randomised controlled trials of non-pharmacological interventions for people with epilepsy and intellectual disabilities.Non-pharmacological

2015 Cochrane

164. Cannabinoids in the Treatment of Epilepsy. (PubMed)

Cannabinoids in the Treatment of Epilepsy. 26352816 2015 09 29 2019 01 17 1533-4406 373 11 2015 Sep 10 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Cannabinoids in the Treatment of Epilepsy. 1048-58 10.1056/NEJMra1407304 Friedman Daniel D Devinsky Orrin O eng Journal Article Review United States N Engl J Med 0255562 0028-4793 0 Anticonvulsants 0 Cannabinoids 0 Medical Marijuana 19GBJ60SN5 Cannabidiol 7J8897W37S Dronabinol I198VBV98I cannabidivarin AIM IM N Engl J Med. 2016 Jan 7;374(1 (...) ):94-5 26672645 N Engl J Med. 2016 Jan 7;374(1):94 N Engl J Med. 2016 Jan 7;374(1):94 26672646 Animals Anticonvulsants chemistry therapeutic use Cannabidiol chemistry therapeutic use Cannabinoids adverse effects chemistry therapeutic use Cannabis chemistry Dronabinol chemistry therapeutic use Epilepsy drug therapy Humans Medical Marijuana adverse effects therapeutic use 2015 9 10 6 0 2015 9 10 6 0 2015 9 30 6 0 ppublish 26352816 10.1056/NEJMra1407304

2015 NEJM

165. Pharmacological interventions for epilepsy in people with intellectual disabilities. (PubMed)

Pharmacological interventions for epilepsy in people with intellectual disabilities. The prevalence of epilepsy among people with intellectual disabilities is much higher than in the general population. Seizures in this population are often complex and refractory to treatment and antiepileptic medication may have a profound effect upon behaviour (Kerr 1997).This is an updated version of a Cochrane Review first published in Issue 3, 2007.To assess the data available from randomised controlled (...) trials (RCTs) of the efficacy of antiepileptic drug (AED) interventions in people with epilepsy and intellectual disabilities.For the latest update of this review, we searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialised Register (2 September 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) via the Cochrane Register of Studies Online (CRSO) (2 September 2014), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to 3 September 2014) and PsycINFO (EBSCOhost, 1887 to 3 September 2014).Randomised and quasi-randomised

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2015 Cochrane

166. Perampanel for tonic-clonic seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy: A randomized trial (PubMed)

Perampanel for tonic-clonic seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy: A randomized trial To assess efficacy and safety of adjunctive perampanel in patients with drug-resistant, primary generalized tonic-clonic (PGTC) seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE).In this multicenter, double-blind study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01393743; funded by Eisai Inc.), patients 12 years or older with PGTC seizures and IGE were randomized to placebo or perampanel during a 4-week titration

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2015 EvidenceUpdates

167. Carbamazepine versus phenytoin monotherapy for epilepsy: an individual participant data review. (PubMed)

Carbamazepine versus phenytoin monotherapy for epilepsy: an individual participant data review. This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 2, 2002 and its subsequent update in 2010.Epilepsy is a common neurological condition in which recurrent, unprovoked seizures are caused by abnormal electrical discharges from the brain. It is believed that with effective drug treatment, up to 70% of individuals with active epilepsy have the potential to become seizure-free (...) with partial onset seizures (simple partial, complex partial, or secondarily generalised tonic-clonic seizures) or generalised tonic-clonic seizures, with or without other generalised seizure types.We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group's Specialised Register (16 September 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 8), MEDLINE (1946 to 16 September 2014), SCOPUS (1823 to 16 September 2014), ClinicalTrials.gov (16 September 2014), and the World Health Organization (WHO

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2015 Cochrane

168. Pharmacological treatments for preventing epilepsy following traumatic head injury. (PubMed)

Pharmacological treatments for preventing epilepsy following traumatic head injury. Head injury is a common event and can cause a spectrum of motor and cognition disabilities. A frequent complication is seizures. Antiepileptic drugs (AED) such as phenytoin are often used in clinical practice with the hopes of preventing post-traumatic epilepsy. Whether immediate medical intervention following head trauma with either AEDs or neuroprotective drugs can alter the process of epileptogenesis and lead (...) to a more favorable outcome is currently unknown. This review attempted to address the effectiveness of these treatment interventions. This review updates and expands on the earlier Cochrane review.To compare the efficacy of antiepileptic drugs and neuroprotective agents with placebo, usual care or other pharmacologic agents for the prevention of post-traumatic epilepsy in people diagnosed with any severity of traumatic brain injury.We searched The Cochrane Epilepsy Group's specialized register, CENTRAL

2015 Cochrane

169. Carbamazepine versus phenobarbitone monotherapy for epilepsy: an individual participant data review. (PubMed)

Carbamazepine versus phenobarbitone monotherapy for epilepsy: an individual participant data review. This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 1, 2003, of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.Epilepsy is a common neurological condition in which abnormal electrical discharges from the brain cause recurrent unprovoked seizures. It is believed that with effective drug treatment, up to 70% of individuals with active epilepsy have the potential to become (...) of CBZ compared with PB when used as monotherapy in people with partial onset seizures (simple or complex partial and secondarily generalised) or generalised onset tonic-clonic seizures (with or without other generalised seizure types).We searched the following databases up to September 2014: the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library (2014, Issue 8), MEDLINE (from 1946), Scopus (from 1823), the US National

2015 Cochrane

170. Neuropsychological and psychological interventions for people with newly diagnosed epilepsy. (PubMed)

Neuropsychological and psychological interventions for people with newly diagnosed epilepsy. Many people with epilepsy report experiencing psychological difficulties such as anxiety, depression and neuropsychological deficits including memory problems. Research has shown that these difficulties are often present not only for people with chronic epilepsy but also for people with newly diagnosed epilepsy. Despite this, there are very few published interventions that detail means to help people (...) with newly diagnosed epilepsy manage these problems.To identify and assess possible psychological and neuropsychological interventions for adults with newly diagnosed epilepsy.We searched the following databases on 30 June 2015: the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (Ovid), SCOPUS, PsycINFO, CINAHL, ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP).This review

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2015 Cochrane

171. Surgery for epilepsy. (PubMed)

Surgery for epilepsy. Focal epilepsies are caused by a malfunction of nerve cells localised in one part of one cerebral hemisphere. In studies, estimates of the number of individuals with focal epilepsy who do not become seizure-free despite optimal drug therapy vary according to the age of the participants and which focal epilepsies are included, but have been reported as at least 20% and in some studies up to 70%. If the epileptogenic zone can be located surgical resection offers the chance (...) of a cure with a corresponding increase in quality of life.The primary objective is to assess the overall outcome of epilepsy surgery according to evidence from randomised controlled trials.The secondary objectives are to assess the overall outcome of epilepsy surgery according to non-randomised evidence and to identify the factors that correlate to remission of seizures postoperatively.We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialised Register (June 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled

2015 Cochrane

172. Corticosteroids including ACTH for childhood epilepsy other than epileptic spasms. (PubMed)

Corticosteroids including ACTH for childhood epilepsy other than epileptic spasms. This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 1, 2007.Epilepsy is a disorder with recurrent epileptic seizures. Corticosteroids have been used in the treatment of children with epilepsy and have significant adverse effects. Their efficacy and tolerability have not been clearly established.To determine the efficacy, in terms of seizure control, improvements in cognition (...) and in quality of life and tolerability of steroids compared to placebo or other antiepileptic drugs in children with epilepsy, excluding epileptic spasms.We searched the following databases: The Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register (1 August 2014); CENTRAL, (The Cochrane Library Issue 7, July 2014); MEDLINE (1946 to 1 August 2014); EMBASE (1966 to December 2004); Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE; Issue 3 of the database published in The Cochrane Library Issue 7, July 2014

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2015 Cochrane

173. Lacosamide add-on therapy for partial epilepsy. (PubMed)

Lacosamide add-on therapy for partial epilepsy. Around half of people with epilepsy will not achieve seizure freedom on their first antiepileptic drug; many will require add-on treatment with another drug. Sometimes multiple treatment combinations are tried to achieve maximum seizure control, although around a third of people do not achieve complete seizure control. Lacosamide is an antiepileptic drug that has been licensed as an add-on treatment for partial epilepsy.To evaluate the efficacy (...) and tolerability of lacosamide when used as an add-on treatment for patients with drug-resistant partial epilepsy.We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group's Specialized Register (21 May 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL , The Cochrane Library Issue 4, April 2015), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to 21 May 2015), Scopus (1823 to 13 November 2014), ClinicalTrials.gov (21 May 2015) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP, 21 May 2015). We imposed no language

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2015 Cochrane

174. Epilepsy after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: A population-based, long-term follow-up study (PubMed)

Epilepsy after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: A population-based, long-term follow-up study The aim was to elucidate the incidence and risk factors of epilepsy after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from saccular intracranial aneurysm (sIA) in a population-based cohort.The Kuopio sIA Database (www.uef.fi/ns) includes all unruptured and ruptured sIA cases admitted to the Kuopio University Hospital from its defined catchment population in Eastern Finland. The use of prescribed medicines (...) , including reimbursable antiepileptic drugs, has been entered from the Finnish national registries. The cumulative incidence and independent risk factors of epilepsy and death were analyzed in 876 patients with sIA-SAH admitted from 1995 to 2007. The competing risks analysis was used to correctly estimate the probability of epilepsy, because epilepsy and death after sIA-SAH may share risk factors.The follow-up ended at death (n = 200) or December 31, 2008; median follow-up time was 76 months. Epilepsy

2015 EvidenceUpdates

175. Yoga for epilepsy. (PubMed)

Yoga for epilepsy. This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2002.Yoga may induce relaxation and stress reduction, and influence the electroencephalogram and the autonomic nervous system, thereby controlling seizures. Yoga would be an attractive therapeutic option for epilepsy if proved effective.To assess whether people with epilepsy treated with yoga:(a) have a greater probability of becoming seizure free;(b) have a significant (...) reduction in the frequency or duration of seizures, or both; and(c) have a better quality of life.We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register (26 March 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, 26 March 2015), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to 26 March 2015), SCOPUS (1823 to 9 January 2014), ClinicalTrials.gov (26 March 2015), the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform ICTRP (26 March 2015), and also

2015 Cochrane

176. Perampanel efficacy and tolerability with enzyme-inducing AEDs in patients with epilepsy (PubMed)

Perampanel efficacy and tolerability with enzyme-inducing AEDs in patients with epilepsy Evaluate the impact of concomitant enzyme (CYP3A4)-inducer antiepileptic drugs (EIAEDs) on the efficacy and safety of perampanel in patients from the 3 phase-III clinical trials.Patients with pharmacoresistant partial-onset seizures in the 3 phase-III clinical studies were aged 12 years and older and receiving 1 to 3 concomitant antiepileptic drugs. Following 6-week baseline, patients were randomized

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2015 EvidenceUpdates

177. Epilepsy drug Kaneuron: hazardous packaging

Epilepsy drug Kaneuron: hazardous packaging Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''Epilepsy drug Kaneuron°: hazardous packaging '', 1 April 2015 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > Epilepsy drug Kaneuron°: hazardous packaging Spotlight Every month, the subjects in Prescrire’s Spotlight. 100 most recent :  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |  Spotlight Epilepsy drug Kaneuron°: hazardous packaging Because of medication errors, the dosing syringe (...) of the drinkable phenobarbital solution has been replaced. But the packaging is still hazardous: two dosing devices are presented side by side and the bottle has no child-proof cap. In France, a drinkable phenobarbital solution is authorised as a treatment for adults and children for partial and generalised epilepsy. The use of phenobarbital is limited because of sedation and behavioural disorders, especially in children, but sometimes it is a useful option. The packaging of Kaneuron° contains two dosing

2015 Prescrire

178. Development and validation of nomograms to provide individualised predictions of seizure outcomes after epilepsy surgery: a retrospective analysis (PubMed)

Development and validation of nomograms to provide individualised predictions of seizure outcomes after epilepsy surgery: a retrospective analysis Half of patients who have resective brain surgery for drug-resistant epilepsy have recurrent postoperative seizures. Although several single predictors of seizure outcome have been identified, no validated method incorporates a patient's complex clinical characteristics into an instrument to predict an individual's post-surgery seizure outcome.We (...) developed nomograms to predict complete freedom from seizures and Engel score of 1 (eventual freedom from seizures allowing for some initial postoperative seizures, or seizures occurring only with physiological stress such as drug withdrawal) at 2 years and 5 years after surgery on the basis of sex, seizure frequency, secondary seizure generalisation, type of surgery, pathological cause, age at epilepsy onset, age at surgery, epilepsy duration at time of surgery, and surgical side. We designed

2015 EvidenceUpdates

179. Effect of a GRIN2A de novo mutation associated with epilepsy and intellectual disability on NMDA receptor currents and Mg<sup>2+</sup> block in cultured primary cortical neurons. (PubMed)

Effect of a GRIN2A de novo mutation associated with epilepsy and intellectual disability on NMDA receptor currents and Mg2+ block in cultured primary cortical neurons. Background GRIN2A encodes the GluN2A subunit of the NMDA receptor (NMDAR), an ionotropic glutamate receptor that has important roles in synaptogenesis and synaptic plasticity. Some individuals with early onset epilepsies and intellectual disability carry heterozygous missense mutations in this gene, including a de-novo

2015 Lancet

180. Presurgical entorhinal cortex volume and postoperative seizure outcome in temporal lobe epilepsy. (PubMed)

Presurgical entorhinal cortex volume and postoperative seizure outcome in temporal lobe epilepsy. Although temporal lobe surgery is an effective treatment for patients with intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE), a third of patients will continue to experience seizures at 2 years after surgery. The reasons are unknown. One suggestion is that patients with abnormalities of the entorhinal cortex might have a subtype of mTLE that is resistant to surgery. We investigated the association

2015 Lancet