Latest & greatest articles for fluoxetine

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Top results for fluoxetine

41. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of antidepressant treatment in primary health care: a six-month randomised study comparing fluoxetine to imipramine

Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of antidepressant treatment in primary health care: a six-month randomised study comparing fluoxetine to imipramine Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2006 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

42. Cognitive therapy is more effective than fluoxetine in people with generalised social phobia

Cognitive therapy is more effective than fluoxetine in people with generalised social phobia Cognitive therapy is more effective than fluoxetine in people with generalised social phobia | Evidence-Based Mental Health We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts (...) OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Cognitive therapy is more effective than fluoxetine in people with generalised social phobia Article Text Therapeutics Cognitive therapy is more effective than fluoxetine in people with generalised

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2005 Evidence-Based Mental Health

43. Fluoxetine, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and their combination for adolescents with depression: Treatment for Adolescents With Depression Study (TADS) randomized controlled trial. (PubMed)

Fluoxetine, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and their combination for adolescents with depression: Treatment for Adolescents With Depression Study (TADS) randomized controlled trial. Initial treatment of major depressive disorder in adolescents may include cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). However, little is known about their relative or combined effectiveness.To evaluate the effectiveness of 4 treatments among adolescents with major depressive (...) disorder.Randomized controlled trial of a volunteer sample of 439 patients between the ages of 12 to 17 years with a primary Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, diagnosis of major depressive disorder. The trial was conducted at 13 US academic and community clinics between spring 2000 and summer 2003.Twelve weeks of (1) fluoxetine alone (10 to 40 mg/d), (2) CBT alone, (3) CBT with fluoxetine (10 to 40 mg/d), or (4) placebo (equivalent to 10 to 40 mg/d). Placebo and fluoxetine

2004 JAMA

44. Similar effectiveness of paroxetine, fluoxetine, and sertraline in primary care: a randomized trial. (PubMed)

Similar effectiveness of paroxetine, fluoxetine, and sertraline in primary care: a randomized trial. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most commonly prescribed class of antidepressant, yet it is not known whether one SSRI is more effective than another.To compare the effectiveness of 3 SSRIs (paroxetine, fluoxetine, and sertraline) in depressed primary care patients.Open-label, randomized, intention-to-treat trial, with patient enrollment occurring in April-November 1999 (...) .Thirty-seven clinics in 2 US primary care research networks.A total of 573 depressed adult patients for whom their primary care physician thought that antidepressant therapy was warranted and who completed a baseline interview.Patients were randomly assigned to receive paroxetine (n = 189), fluoxetine (n = 193), or sertraline (n = 191) for 9 months. Primary care physicians were allowed to switch patients to a different SSRI or non-SSRI antidepressant if they did not adequately respond to or tolerate

2001 JAMA

45. Cost-effectiveness of fluoxetine plus pindolol in patients with major depressive disorder: results from a randomized, double-blind clinical trial

Cost-effectiveness of fluoxetine plus pindolol in patients with major depressive disorder: results from a randomized, double-blind clinical trial Cost-effectiveness of fluoxetine plus pindolol in patients with major depressive disorder: results from a randomized, double-blind clinical trial Cost-effectiveness of fluoxetine plus pindolol in patients with major depressive disorder: results from a randomized, double-blind clinical trial Sacristan J A, Gilaberte I, Boto B, Buesching D P, Obenchain (...) R L, Demitrack M, Sola V P, Alvarez E, Artigas F Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology Fluoxetine plus pindolol for patients with depressive disorder. Type of intervention Treatment. Economic study type Cost

2000 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

46. Economic impact of using mirtazapine compared to amitriptyline and fluoxetine in the treatment of moderate and severe depression in the UK

Economic impact of using mirtazapine compared to amitriptyline and fluoxetine in the treatment of moderate and severe depression in the UK Economic impact of using mirtazapine compared to amitriptyline and fluoxetine in the treatment of moderate and severe depression in the UK Economic impact of using mirtazapine compared to amitriptyline and fluoxetine in the treatment of moderate and severe depression in the UK Borghi J, Guest J F Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic (...) evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology Mirtazapine compared to amitriptyline and fluoxetine in the treatment of moderate and severe depression in the UK. Type of intervention Treatment. Economic study type Cost-effectiveness analysis. Study population Patients in the UK

2000 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

47. Cost-effectiveness of mirtazapine relative to fluoxetine in the treatment of moderate and severe depression in France

Cost-effectiveness of mirtazapine relative to fluoxetine in the treatment of moderate and severe depression in France Cost-effectiveness of mirtazapine relative to fluoxetine in the treatment of moderate and severe depression in France Cost-effectiveness of mirtazapine relative to fluoxetine in the treatment of moderate and severe depression in France Brown M C, van Loon J M, Guest J F Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion (...) on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology The new antidepressant drug mirtazapine was compared with fluoxetine. Type of intervention Treatment. Economic study type Cost-effectiveness analysis. Study population The study population comprised patients with moderate (17-Hamilton-Depression, HAM-D, score of 20 to 25) or severe

2000 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

48. Cost-effectiveness of mirtazapine compared to amitriptyline and fluoxetine in the treatment of moderate and severe depression in Austria

Cost-effectiveness of mirtazapine compared to amitriptyline and fluoxetine in the treatment of moderate and severe depression in Austria Cost-effectiveness of mirtazapine compared to amitriptyline and fluoxetine in the treatment of moderate and severe depression in Austria Cost-effectiveness of mirtazapine compared to amitriptyline and fluoxetine in the treatment of moderate and severe depression in Austria Brown M C J, Nimmerrichter A A, Guest J F Record Status This is a critical abstract (...) of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology The use of mirtazapine, amitriptyline, and fluoxetine in the treatment of moderate and severe depression in Austria. Type of intervention Treatment. Economic study type Cost-effectiveness analysis. Study population Austrian people

1999 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

49. A controlled study of fluoxetine and cognitive-behavioural counselling in the treatment of postnatal depression. (PubMed)

A controlled study of fluoxetine and cognitive-behavioural counselling in the treatment of postnatal depression. To study the effectiveness of fluoxetine and cognitive-behavioural counselling in depressive illness in postnatal women: to compare fluoxetine and placebo, six sessions and one session of counselling, and combinations of drugs and counselling.Randomised, controlled treatment trial, double blind in relation to drug treatment, with four treatment cells: fluoxetine or placebo plus one (...) in subjects receiving fluoxetine was significantly greater than in those receiving placebo. The improvement after six sessions of counselling was significantly greater than after a single session. Interaction between counselling and fluoxetine was not statistically significant. These differences were evident after one week, and improvement in all groups was complete after four weeks.Both fluoxetine and cognitive-behavioural counselling given as a course of therapy are effective treatments for non

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1997 BMJ

50. Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of pindolol in combination with fluoxetine antidepressant treatment. (PubMed)

Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of pindolol in combination with fluoxetine antidepressant treatment. Major depression affects more than 5% of the population and is a serious health and economic problem. Antidepressants have a slow onset of action and are effective in less than two-thirds of patients. The biochemical effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may be limited by the negative feedback from serotonin autoreceptors. Pindolol is an antagonist of both (...) serotonin autoreceptors and beta-adrenoceptors. We studied the effect of the addition of pindolol to fluoxetine antidepressant treatment.Of 132 eligible patients with major depression, 111 were randomly assigned to treatment with fluoxetine (20 mg daily) and either placebo or pindolol (7.5 mg daily). Patients were assessed twice a week for the first 3 weeks of active treatment and then once a week until the end of the study (42 days). Hamilton and Montgomery-Asberg depression-rating scales were used

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1997 Lancet

51. Acute medical costs of fluoxetine versus tricyclic antidepressants

Acute medical costs of fluoxetine versus tricyclic antidepressants Acute medical costs of fluoxetine versus tricyclic antidepressants Acute medical costs of fluoxetine versus tricyclic antidepressants Revicki D A, Palmer C S, Phillips S D, Reblando J A, Heiligenstein J H, Brent J, Kulig K Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed (...) by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology Pharmaceutical: Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Type of intervention Treatment. Economic study type Cost-effectiveness analysis. Study population Patients overdosing on either fluoxetine (SSRI) or tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). Setting Hospital (emergency departments and intensive care/medical units). The economic study was carried out at 9

1997 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

52. Initial antidepressant choice in primary care. Effectiveness and cost of fluoxetine vs tricyclic antidepressants. (PubMed)

Initial antidepressant choice in primary care. Effectiveness and cost of fluoxetine vs tricyclic antidepressants. To compare the clinical, functional, and economic outcomes of initially prescribing fluoxetine with outcomes of initially selecting imipramine or desipramine.Randomized controlled trial.Primary care clinics of a Seattle, Wash, area staff-model health maintenance organization from 1992 through 1994.A total of 536 adults beginning antidepressant treatment for depression.Random (...) assignment of initial antidepressant prescription (desipramine, fluoxetine, or imipramine). Subsequent antidepressant treatment (doses, medication changes or discontinuation, specialty referral) was managed by the primary care physician.Assessments after 1, 3, and 6 months examined clinical outcomes (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and the depression subscale of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist) and quality-of-life outcomes (Medical Outcomes Study SF-36). Medication use and health care costs were assessed

1996 JAMA

53. Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of fluoxetine in chronic fatigue syndrome. (PubMed)

Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of fluoxetine in chronic fatigue syndrome. No somatic treatment has been found to be effective for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Antidepressant therapy is commonly used. Fluoxetine is recommended in preference to tricyclic agents because it has fewer sedative and autonomic nervous system effects. However, there have been no randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind studies showing the effectiveness of antidepressant therapy in CFS. We have (...) carried out such a study to assess the effect of fluoxetine in depressed and non-depressed CFS patients.In this randomised, double-blind study, we recruited 44 patients to the depressed CFS group, and 52 to the non-depressed CFS group. In each group participants were randomly assigned to receive either fluoxetine (20 mg once daily) or placebo for 8 weeks. The effect of fluoxetine was assessed by questionnaires, self-observation lists, standard neuropsychological tests, and a motion-sensing device

1996 Lancet

54. Fluoxetine in the treatment of premenstrual dysphoria. Canadian Fluoxetine/Premenstrual Dysphoria Collaborative Study Group. (PubMed)

Fluoxetine in the treatment of premenstrual dysphoria. Canadian Fluoxetine/Premenstrual Dysphoria Collaborative Study Group. Premenstrual dysphoria shares certain features with depression and anxiety states, which have been linked to serotonergic dysregulation. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of fluoxetine (which selectively inhibits the reuptake of serotonin) in the treatment of premenstrual dysphoria.The trial consisted of a single-blind, placebo washout period lasting two menstrual (...) cycles, followed by a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of fluoxetine at a dose of either 20 mg or 60 mg per day or placebo for six menstrual cycles. Healthy women meeting criteria for what was then called late-luteal-phase dysphoric disorder were recruited at seven university-affiliated women's health clinics in Canada. The primary outcome measure consisted of visual-analogue scales for tension, irritability, and dysphoria during the late luteal phase of each cycle.Of 405 women

1995 NEJM

55. Antidepressant pharmacotherapy: economic evaluation of fluoxetine, paroxetine and sertraline in a health maintenance organization

Antidepressant pharmacotherapy: economic evaluation of fluoxetine, paroxetine and sertraline in a health maintenance organization Antidepressant pharmacotherapy: economic evaluation of fluoxetine, paroxetine and sertraline in a health maintenance organization Antidepressant pharmacotherapy: economic evaluation of fluoxetine, paroxetine and sertraline in a health maintenance organization Sclar D A, Robison L M, Skaer T L, Galin R S, Legg R F, Nemec N L, Hughes T E, Buesching D P, Morgan M Record (...) Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) in antidepressant pharmacotherapy; (a) paroxetine, (b)sertraline, and (c) fluoxetine in the treatment of depression. Type of intervention

1995 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

56. Effects of desipramine, amitriptyline, and fluoxetine on pain in diabetic neuropathy. (PubMed)

Effects of desipramine, amitriptyline, and fluoxetine on pain in diabetic neuropathy. Amitriptyline reduces the pain caused by peripheral-nerve disease, but treatment is often limited by side effects related to the drug's many pharmacologic actions. Selective agents might be safer and more effective.We carried out two randomized, double-blind, crossover studies in patients with painful diabetic neuropathy, comparing amitriptyline with the relatively selective blocker of norepinephrine reuptake (...) desipramine in 38 patients, and comparing the selective blocker of serotonin reuptake fluoxetine with placebo in 46 patients. Fifty-seven patients were randomly assigned to a study as well as to the order of treatment, permitting comparison among all three drugs and placebo as the first treatment. The patients rated the degree of pain present each day using verbal descriptors, and they also assessed the extent of pain relief globally at the end of each treatment period.After individual dose titration

1992 NEJM

57. Fluoxetine and suicide: a meta-analysis of controlled trials of treatment for depression. (PubMed)

Fluoxetine and suicide: a meta-analysis of controlled trials of treatment for depression. A comprehensive meta-analysis of clinical trial data was performed to assess the possible association of fluoxetine and suicidality (suicidal acts and ideation).Retrospective analysis of pooled data from 17 double blind clinical trials in patients with major depressive disorder comparing fluoxetine (n = 1765) with a tricyclic antidepressant (n = 731) or placebo (n = 569), or both.Multiple data sources were (...) significantly in comparisons of fluoxetine with placebo (0.2% v 0.2%, p = 0.494, Mantel-Haenszel adjusted incidence difference) and with tricyclic antidepressants (0.7% v 0.4%, p = 0.419). The pooled incidence of suicidal acts was 0.3% for fluoxetine, 0.2% for placebo, and 0.4% for tricyclic antidepressants, and fluoxetine did not differ significantly from either placebo (p = 0.533, Pearson's chi 2) or tricyclic antidepressants (p = 0.789). Suicidal ideation emerged marginally significantly less often

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1991 BMJ