Latest & greatest articles for folic acid

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Top results for folic acid

61. Daily oral vitamin B-12 with or without folic acid for 24 weeks did not improve cognitive function in elderly people

Daily oral vitamin B-12 with or without folic acid for 24 weeks did not improve cognitive function in elderly people Daily oral vitamin B-12 with or without folic acid for 24 weeks did not improve cognitive function in elderly people | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your (...) username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Daily oral vitamin B-12 with or without folic acid for 24 weeks did not improve cognitive function in elderly people Article Text Therapeutics Daily oral

2008 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

62. Aspirin and folic acid for the prevention of recurrent colorectal adenomas (PubMed)

Aspirin and folic acid for the prevention of recurrent colorectal adenomas Although observational studies have found regular aspirin use to be associated with a reduced risk of colorectal neoplasia, results from randomized trials using aspirin have been inconsistent. Dietary folate intake also has been found to be associated with a reduced risk of colorectal neoplasms in observational studies.A multicenter, randomized, double-blind trial of aspirin (300 mg/day) and folate supplements (0.5 mg

2008 EvidenceUpdates

63. Effect of combined folic acid, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 on cancer risk in women: a randomized trial. (PubMed)

Effect of combined folic acid, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 on cancer risk in women: a randomized trial. Folate, vitamin B(6), and vitamin B(12) are thought to play an important role in cancer prevention.To evaluate the effect of combined folic acid, vitamin B(6), and vitamin B(12) treatment on cancer risk in women at high risk for cardiovascular disease.In the Women's Antioxidant and Folic Acid Cardiovascular Study, 5442 US female health professionals aged 42 years or older, with preexisting (...) cardiovascular disease or 3 or more coronary risk factors, were randomly assigned to receive either a daily combination of folic acid, vitamin B(6), and vitamin B(12) or a matching placebo. They were treated for 7.3 years from April 1998 through July 31, 2005.Daily supplementation of a combination of 2.5 mg of folic acid, 50 mg of vitamin B(6), and 1 mg of vitamin B(12) (n = 2721) or placebo (n = 2721).Confirmed newly diagnosed total invasive cancer or breast cancer.A total of 379 women developed invasive

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2008 JAMA

64. Effect of folic acid and B vitamins on risk of cardiovascular events and total mortality among women at high risk for cardiovascular disease: a randomized trial. (PubMed)

Effect of folic acid and B vitamins on risk of cardiovascular events and total mortality among women at high risk for cardiovascular disease: a randomized trial. Recent randomized trials among patients with preexisting cardiovascular disease (CVD) have failed to support benefits of B-vitamin supplementation on cardiovascular risk. Observational data suggest benefits may be greater among women, yet women have been underrepresented in published randomized trials.To test whether a combination (...) of folic acid, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 lowers risk of CVD among high-risk women with and without CVD.Within an ongoing randomized trial of antioxidant vitamins, 5442 women who were US health professionals aged 42 years or older, with either a history of CVD or 3 or more coronary risk factors, were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to receive a combination pill containing folic acid, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 or a matching placebo, and were treated for 7.3 years from

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2008 JAMA

65. A systematic review of interventions to increase awareness, knowledge, and folic acid consumption before and during pregnancy

A systematic review of interventions to increase awareness, knowledge, and folic acid consumption before and during pregnancy Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2008 DARE.

66. Lowering homocysteine with folic acid and B vitamins did not prevent vascular events after myocardial infarction

Lowering homocysteine with folic acid and B vitamins did not prevent vascular events after myocardial infarction Lowering homocysteine with folic acid and B vitamins did not prevent vascular events after myocardial infarction | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username (...) and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Lowering homocysteine with folic acid and B vitamins did not prevent vascular events after myocardial infarction Article Text Therapeutics Lowering homocysteine

2007 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

67. Lowering homocysteine with folic acid and B vitamins did not prevent vascular events in vascular disease

Lowering homocysteine with folic acid and B vitamins did not prevent vascular events in vascular disease Lowering homocysteine with folic acid and B vitamins did not prevent vascular events in vascular disease | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password (...) For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Lowering homocysteine with folic acid and B vitamins did not prevent vascular events in vascular disease Article Text Therapeutics Lowering homocysteine with folic acid and B

2007 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

68. Reduction in neural-tube defects after folic acid fortification in Canada. (PubMed)

Reduction in neural-tube defects after folic acid fortification in Canada. In 1998, folic acid fortification of a large variety of cereal products became mandatory in Canada, a country where the prevalence of neural-tube defects was historically higher in the eastern provinces than in the western provinces. We assessed changes in the prevalence of neural-tube defects in Canada before and after food fortification with folic acid was implemented.The study population included live births (...) bifida (a decrease of 53%) than for anencephaly and encephalocele (decreases of 38% and 31%, respectively).Food fortification with folic acid was associated with a significant reduction in the rate of neural-tube defects in Canada. The decrease was greatest in areas in which the baseline rate was high.Copyright 2007 Massachusetts Medical Society.

2007 NEJM

69. Efficacy of folic acid supplementation in stroke prevention: a meta-analysis. (PubMed)

Efficacy of folic acid supplementation in stroke prevention: a meta-analysis. The efficacy of treatments that lower homocysteine concentrations in reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease remains controversial. Our aim was to do a meta-analysis of relevant randomised trials to assess the efficacy of folic acid supplementation in the prevention of stroke.We collected data from eight randomised trials of folic acid that had stroke reported as one of the endpoints. Relative risk (RR) was used (...) as a measure of the effect of folic acid supplementation on the risk of stroke with a random effect model. The analysis was further stratified by factors that could affect the treatment effects.Folic acid supplementation significantly reduced the risk of stroke by 18% (RR 0.82, 95% CI 0.68-1.00; p=0.045). In the stratified analyses, a greater beneficial effect was seen in those trials with a treatment duration of more than 36 months (0.71, 0.57-0.87; p=0.001), a decrease in the concentration

2007 Lancet

70. Folic acid supplements and risk of facial clefts: national population based case-control study. (PubMed)

Folic acid supplements and risk of facial clefts: national population based case-control study. To explore the role of folic acid supplements, dietary folates, and multivitamins in the prevention of facial clefts.National population based case-control study.Infants born 1996-2001 in Norway.377 infants with cleft lip with or without cleft palate; 196 infants with cleft palate alone; 763 controls.Association of facial clefts with maternal intake of folic acid supplements, multivitamins (...) risk of cleft lip was among women with folate rich diets who also took folic acid supplements and multivitamins (0.36, 0.17 to 0.77). Folic acid provided no protection against cleft palate alone (1.07, 0.56 to 2.03).Folic acid supplements during early pregnancy seem to reduce the risk of isolated cleft lip (with or without cleft palate) by about a third. Other vitamins and dietary factors may provide additional benefit.

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2007 BMJ

71. Effect of 3-year folic acid supplementation on cognitive function in older adults in the FACIT trial: a randomised, double blind, controlled trial. (PubMed)

Effect of 3-year folic acid supplementation on cognitive function in older adults in the FACIT trial: a randomised, double blind, controlled trial. Low folate and raised homocysteine concentrations in blood are associated with poor cognitive performance in the general population. As part of the FACIT trial to assess the effect of folic acid on markers of atherosclerosis in men and women aged 50-70 years with raised plasma total homocysteine and normal serum vitamin B12 at screening, we report (...) here the findings for the secondary endpoint: the effect of folic acid supplementation on cognitive performance.Our randomised, double blind, placebo controlled study took place between November, 1999, and December, 2004, in the Netherlands. We randomly assigned 818 participants 800 mug daily oral folic acid or placebo for 3 years. The effect on cognitive performance was measured as the difference between the two groups in the 3-year change in performance for memory, sensorimotor speed, complex

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2007 Lancet

72. Folic acid for the prevention of colorectal adenomas: a randomized clinical trial. (PubMed)

Folic acid for the prevention of colorectal adenomas: a randomized clinical trial. Laboratory and epidemiological data suggest that folic acid may have an antineoplastic effect in the large intestine.To assess the safety and efficacy of folic acid supplementation for preventing colorectal adenomas.A double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2-factor, phase 3, randomized clinical trial conducted at 9 clinical centers between July 6, 1994, and October 1, 2004. Participants included 1021 men and women (...) with a recent history of colorectal adenomas and no previous invasive large intestine carcinoma.Participants were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive 1 mg/d of folic acid (n = 516) or placebo (n = 505), and were separately randomized to receive aspirin (81 or 325 mg/d) or placebo. Follow-up consisted of 2 colonoscopic surveillance cycles (the first interval was at 3 years and the second at 3 or 5 years later).The primary outcome measure was occurrence of at least 1 colorectal adenoma. Secondary

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2007 JAMA

73. Folic acid and risk of twinning: a systematic review of the recent literature, July 1994 to July 2006

Folic acid and risk of twinning: a systematic review of the recent literature, July 1994 to July 2006 Folic acid and risk of twinning: a systematic review of the recent literature, July 1994 to July 2006 Folic acid and risk of twinning: a systematic review of the recent literature, July 1994 to July 2006 Muggli E E, Halliday J L CRD summary The authors concluded that there is evidence of a possible association between periconceptional folic acid and the risk of twinning, but further research (...) is required. The authors' cautious conclusions appear to reflect the limited data, but the poorly defined review question, inadequate reporting of the review methods and inadequate quality assessment make it difficult to assess the reliability of these conclusions. Authors' objectives To examine the association between periconceptional folic acid (FA) supplementation and fortification of foods with FA and the risk of twinning. Searching The Cochrane Library (Issue 4, 2005), MEDLINE via PubMed, MEDLINE

2007 DARE.

74. Cost-effectiveness of a folic acid fortification program in Chile

Cost-effectiveness of a folic acid fortification program in Chile Cost-effectiveness of a folic acid fortification program in Chile Cost-effectiveness of a folic acid fortification program in Chile Llanos A, Hertrampf E, Cortes F, Pardo A, Grosse S D, Uauy R Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical (...) assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. CRD summary This study determined the cost-effectiveness of wheat flour fortified with folic acid, compared with standard wheat flour, in the periconceptional period to reduce neural tube defects (NTDs) in all births weighing more than 499 g in Chile. The authors concluded that the programme was a cost-effective intervention for the prevention of NTDs in Chile. The quality of the study methodology was satisfactory, with good reporting

2007 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

75. Folic acid improves vascular reactivity in humans: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Folic acid improves vascular reactivity in humans: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Folic acid improves vascular reactivity in humans: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Folic acid improves vascular reactivity in humans: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials de Bree A, van Mierlo LA, Draijer R CRD summary The review aimed to quantify the effect of folic acid on endothelial function and concluded that high doses improved function after four weeks (...) of supplementation. The presence of review methodology and reporting issues, coupled with the small sample sizes of included studies, means the authors' conclusions should be interpreted with caution. Authors' objectives To quantify the effect of folic acid on endothelial function, as measured with the use of flow-mediated dilatation. Searching MEDLINE was searched from 1966 to September 2005 for studies published in English; search terms were reported. Conference abstract books and reference lists of obtained

2007 DARE.

76. Efficacy of folic acid supplementation in stroke prevention: a meta-analysis

Efficacy of folic acid supplementation in stroke prevention: a meta-analysis Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2007 DARE.

77. Effects of routine oral iron supplementation with or without folic acid for women during pregnancy. (PubMed)

Effects of routine oral iron supplementation with or without folic acid for women during pregnancy. It has been suggested that routine intake of supplements containing iron or combination of iron and folic acid during pregnancy improves maternal health and pregnancy outcomes.To assess the efficacy, effectiveness and safety of routine antenatal daily or intermittent iron supplementation with or without folic acid during pregnancy on the health of mothers and newborns.We searched the Cochrane (...) Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (June 2005). Additionally, we contacted relevant organizations for the identification of ongoing and unpublished studies.All randomised or quasi-randomised trials evaluating the effect of routine supplementation with iron or combination of iron and folic acid during pregnancy.We assessed trials for methodological quality using the standard Cochrane criteria. Two authors independently assessed the trials for inclusion and one author extracted data. We

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2006 Cochrane

78. Folic acid: a public-health challenge. (PubMed)

Folic acid: a public-health challenge. Despite worldwide public-health campaigns recommending periconceptional daily supplementation of synthetic folic acid to reduce the risk of neural tube defects, many women are not following these recommendations. At the same time, in most European countries no decline in defects has been recorded in recent years. Vulnerable groups are those with a low standard of education, young people, and women with unplanned pregnancies. Furthermore, in most countries (...) without mandatory fortification, the general population is not consuming the recommended 0.4 mg of food folate per day. Voluntary fortification improves the situation, but does not reach all parts of the population. In the USA, Canada, and Chile, mandatory fortification of flour substantially improved folate and homocysteine status, and neural tube defects rates fell by between 31% and 78%. Nevertheless, many countries do not choose mandatory folic acid fortification, in part because expected

2006 Lancet

79. Effect of routine prophylactic supplementation with iron and folic acid on preschool child mortality in southern Nepal: community-based, cluster-randomised, placebo-controlled trial. (PubMed)

Effect of routine prophylactic supplementation with iron and folic acid on preschool child mortality in southern Nepal: community-based, cluster-randomised, placebo-controlled trial. Iron deficiency is widespread in the developing world and is especially common in young children who live on the Indian subcontinent. Supplementation with iron and folic acid alleviates severe anaemia and enhances neurodevelopment in deficient populations, but little is known about the risks of mortality (...) and morbidity associated with supplementation.We did a community-based, cluster-randomised, double-masked, placebo-controlled, 2x2 factorial trial in children aged 1-36 months and residing in southern Nepal. We randomly assigned children daily oral supplementation to age 36 months with: iron (12.5 mg) and folic acid (50 microg; n=8337), zinc alone (10 mg), iron, folic acid, and zinc (n=9230), or placebo (n=8683); children aged 1-11 months received half the dose. Our primary outcome measure was all-cause

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2006 Lancet

80. Effects of routine prophylactic supplementation with iron and folic acid on admission to hospital and mortality in preschool children in a high malaria transmission setting: community-based, randomised, placebo-controlled trial. (PubMed)

Effects of routine prophylactic supplementation with iron and folic acid on admission to hospital and mortality in preschool children in a high malaria transmission setting: community-based, randomised, placebo-controlled trial. Anaemia caused by iron deficiency is common in children younger than age 5 years in eastern Africa. However, there is concern that universal supplementation of children with iron and folic acid in areas of high malaria transmission might be harmful.We did a randomised (...) , placebo-controlled trial, of children aged 1-35 months and living in Pemba, Zanzibar. We assigned children to daily oral supplementation with: iron (12.5 mg) and folic acid (50 mug; n=7950), iron, folic acid, and zinc (n=8120), or placebo (n=8006); children aged 1-11 months received half the dose. Our primary endpoints were all-cause mortality and admission to hospital. Analyses were by intention to treat. This study is registered as an International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial, number

2006 Lancet