Latest & greatest articles for ibuprofen

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Top results for ibuprofen

81. Paracetamol plus ibuprofen for the treatment of fever in children (PITCH): randomised controlled trial. (Full text)

Paracetamol plus ibuprofen for the treatment of fever in children (PITCH): randomised controlled trial. To investigate whether paracetamol (acetaminophen) plus ibuprofen are superior to either drug alone for increasing time without fever and the relief of fever associated discomfort in febrile children managed at home.Individually randomised, blinded, three arm trial.Primary care and households in England.Children aged between 6 months and 6 years with axillary temperatures of at least 37.8 (...) degrees C and up to 41.0 degrees C.Advice on physical measures to reduce temperature and the provision of, and advice to give, paracetamol plus ibuprofen, paracetamol alone, or ibuprofen alone.Primary outcomes were the time without fever (<37.2 degrees C) in the first four hours after the first dose was given and the proportion of children reported as being normal on the discomfort scale at 48 hours. Secondary outcomes were time to first occurrence of normal temperature (fever clearance), time without

2008 BMJ PubMed

82. Paracetamol plus ibuprofen for the treatment of fever in children (PITCH): economic evaluation of a randomised controlled trial. (Full text)

Paracetamol plus ibuprofen for the treatment of fever in children (PITCH): economic evaluation of a randomised controlled trial. To estimate the cost to the NHS and to parents and carers of treating febrile preschool children with paracetamol, ibuprofen, or both, and to compare these costs with the benefits of each treatment regimen.Cost consequences analysis and cost effectiveness analysis conducted as part of a three arm, randomised controlled trial.Children between the ages of 6 months and 6 (...) years recruited from primary care and the community with axillary temperatures >or=37.8 degrees C and ibuprofen, or both drugs.Costs to the NHS and to parents and carers. Cost consequences analysis at 48 hours and 5 days comparing cost with children's temperature, discomfort, activity, appetite, and sleep; cost effectiveness analysis at 48 hours comparing cost with percentage of children "recovered."Difficulties in recruiting children to the trial lowered the precision

2008 BMJ PubMed

83. Advice to use topical or oral ibuprofen for chronic knee pain in older people: randomised controlled trial and patient preference study. (Full text)

Advice to use topical or oral ibuprofen for chronic knee pain in older people: randomised controlled trial and patient preference study. To determine whether older patients with chronic knee pain should be advised to use topical or oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).Randomised controlled trial and patient preference study.26 general practices.People aged > or =50 with knee pain: 282 in randomised trial and 303 in preference study.Advice to use topical or oral ibuprofen. Primary

2008 BMJ PubMed

84. A randomized controlled trial comparing acetaminophen plus ibuprofen versus acetaminophen plus codeine plus caffeine after outpatient general surgery (PubMed)

A randomized controlled trial comparing acetaminophen plus ibuprofen versus acetaminophen plus codeine plus caffeine after outpatient general surgery Narcotics are used extensively in outpatient general surgery but are often poorly tolerated with variable efficacy. Acetaminophen combined with NSAIDs is a possible alternative. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of acetaminophen, codeine, and caffeine (Tylenol No. 3) with acetaminophen and ibuprofen for management of pain (...) after outpatient general surgery procedures.A double-blind randomized controlled trial was performed in patients undergoing outpatient inguinal/umbilical/ventral hernia repair or laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Patients were randomized to receive acetaminophen plus codeine plus caffeine (Tylenol No. 3) or acetaminophen plus ibuprofen (AcIBU) 4 times daily for 7 days or until pain-free. Pain intensity, measured four times daily by visual analogue scale, was the primary outcome. Secondary end points

2008 EvidenceUpdates

85. Topical or oral ibuprofen for chronic knee pain in older people. The TOIB study

Topical or oral ibuprofen for chronic knee pain in older people. The TOIB study Topical or oral ibuprofen for chronic knee pain in older people. The TOIB study Topical or oral ibuprofen for chronic knee pain in older people. The TOIB study Underwood M, Ashby D, Carnes D, Castelnuovo E, Cross P, Harding G, Hennessy E, Letley L, Martin J, Mt-Isa S, Parsons S, Spencer A, Vickers M, Whyte K Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member (...) of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Underwood M, Ashby D, Carnes D, Castelnuovo E, Cross P, Harding G, Hennessy E, Letley L, Martin J, Mt-Isa S, Parsons S, Spencer A, Vickers M, Whyte K. Topical or oral ibuprofen for chronic knee pain in older people. The TOIB study. Health Technology Assessment 2008; 12(22): 1-176 Authors' objectives The objective of the study was to determine whether GPs should advise their older patients with chronic

2008 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

86. Cost-effectiveness of advising the use of topical or oral ibuprofen for knee pain: the TOIB study [ISRCTN: 79353052]

Cost-effectiveness of advising the use of topical or oral ibuprofen for knee pain: the TOIB study [ISRCTN: 79353052] Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2008 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

87. Acetaminophen and ibuprofen for prevention of adverse reactions associated with childhood immunization

Acetaminophen and ibuprofen for prevention of adverse reactions associated with childhood immunization Acetaminophen and ibuprofen for prevention of adverse reactions associated with childhood immunization Acetaminophen and ibuprofen for prevention of adverse reactions associated with childhood immunization Manley J, Taddio A CRD summary This review investigated use of acetaminophen and ibuprofen for prevention of adverse reactions associated with childhood immunisation. The authors concluded (...) that acetaminophen and ibuprofen may prevent adverse events in young infants receiving diphtheria-tetanus toxoids-whole pertussis vaccine. No benefits were demonstrated for the diphtheria-tetanusoxides acellular pertussis vaccine. The conclusions may not be reliable due to methodological limitations. Authors' objectives To evaluate prophylactic use of acetaminophen and ibuprofen for prevention of adverse reactions associated with childhood immunisation. Searching MEDLINE (1966 to February 2007), PubMed (1966

2007 DARE.

88. Drugs - Ibuprofen

Drugs - Ibuprofen PRESENTATION A solution or suspension containing ibuprofen 100 milligrams in 5ml or tablet form containing 200 milligrams, 400 milligrams, and 600 milligrams. ACTIONS Analgesic (pain relieving) and antipyretic (temperature reducing) drug. Anti-in?ammatory (in?ammation reducing). SIDE EFFECTS Ibuprofen may cause nausea, vomiting, and tinnitus. DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION Route: Oral INDICATIONS Relief of mild to moderate pain and/or high temperature. Pain and in?ammation of soft (...) tissue injuries. CONTRA-INDICATIONS Should not be administered to dehydrated patients. Asthma Known allergy or hypersensitivity to non-steroidal anti-in?ammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Active upper gastro-intestinal disturbance (e.g. oesophagitis, peptic ulcer, dyspepsia). If a product containing NSAID properties (e.g. Diclofenac, Naproxen) has been given within the last four hours or if the maximum cumulative daily dose has been given then further NSAID i.e. ibuprofen should NOT be given. AGE DOSE VOLUME

2007 Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee

89. Ibuprofen for the prevention of patent ductus arteriosus in preterm and/or low birth weight infants. (Full text)

Ibuprofen for the prevention of patent ductus arteriosus in preterm and/or low birth weight infants. A patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) often complicates the clinical course of preterm infants and increases the risk of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), chronic lung disease (CLD) and death. The standard treatment to close a PDA is indomethacin. Its use is associated with renal, gastrointestinal and cerebral side-effects. Ibuprofen has been shown to be effective (...) in closing a PDA without reducing blood flow velocity to the brain, gut or kidneys.To determine the effectiveness and safety of prophylactic ibuprofen compared to placebo/no intervention or other cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor drugs (indomethacin, mefenamic acid, etc) in the prevention of PDA in preterm infants.Randomized controlled trials comparing prophylactic ibuprofen use with placebo/no intervention/indomethacin were identified by searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trial (CENTRAL

2006 Cochrane PubMed

90. Safety and efficacy of routine postoperative ibuprofen for pain and disability related to ectopic bone formation after hip replacement surgery (HIPAID): randomised controlled trial. (Full text)

Safety and efficacy of routine postoperative ibuprofen for pain and disability related to ectopic bone formation after hip replacement surgery (HIPAID): randomised controlled trial. To determine the benefits and risks of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) as prophylaxis for ectopic bone formation in patients undergoing total hip replacement (or revision) surgery.Double blind randomised placebo controlled clinical trial, stratified by treatment site and surgery (primary or revision (...) ).20 orthopaedic surgery centres in Australia and New Zealand.902 patients undergoing elective primary or revision total hip replacement surgery.14 days' treatment with ibuprofen (1200 mg daily) or matching placebo started within 24 hours of surgery.Changes in self reported hip pain and physical function 6 to 12 months after surgery (Western Ontario and McMaster University Arthritis index).There were no significant differences between the groups for improvements in hip pain (mean difference -0.1

2006 BMJ PubMed

91. Ibuprofen

Ibuprofen PRESENTATION A solution or suspension containing ibuprofen 100 milligrams in 5ml or tablet form containing 200 milligrams, 400 milligrams, and 600 milligrams. ACTIONS Analgesic (pain relieving) and antipyretic (temperature reducing) drug. Anti-in?ammatory (in?ammation reducing). SIDE EFFECTS Ibuprofen may cause nausea, vomiting, and tinnitus. DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION Route: Oral INDICATIONS Relief of mild to moderate pain and/or high temperature. Pain and in?ammation of soft tissue (...) injuries. CONTRA-INDICATIONS Should not be administered to dehydrated patients. Asthma Known allergy or hypersensitivity to non-steroidal anti-in?ammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Active upper gastro-intestinal disturbance (e.g. oesophagitis, peptic ulcer, dyspepsia). If a product containing NSAID properties (e.g. Diclofenac, Naproxen) has been given within the last four hours or if the maximum cumulative daily dose has been given then further NSAID i.e. ibuprofen should NOT be given. AGE DOSE VOLUME Adults >12

2006 Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee

92. Review: no evidence exists that paracetamol and ibuprofen differ for short term pain relief or safety in children, but ibuprofen more effectively reduces fever (Full text)

Review: no evidence exists that paracetamol and ibuprofen differ for short term pain relief or safety in children, but ibuprofen more effectively reduces fever Review: no evidence exists that paracetamol and ibuprofen differ for short term pain relief or safety in children, but ibuprofen more effectively reduces fever | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time (...) . To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Review: no evidence exists that paracetamol and ibuprofen differ for short term

2006 Evidence-Based Mental Health PubMed

93. Brief communication: duration of platelet dysfunction after a 7-day course of Ibuprofen. (PubMed)

Brief communication: duration of platelet dysfunction after a 7-day course of Ibuprofen. Despite a paucity of evidence, clinicians routinely advise that patients discontinue using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including ibuprofen, at least 1 week before most surgical procedures.To define the duration of ibuprofen-induced platelet dysfunction.Prospective cohort study.Denver/Aurora, Colorado.11 healthy adult volunteers.Individuals were tested at baseline and serially after (...) completion of a 7-day course of ibuprofen (600 mg orally every 8 hours). The platelet function analyzer (PFA-100, Dade Behring, Newark, Delaware), a test that has replaced the bleeding time in many clinical settings, was used.All participants exhibited normal platelet function before starting ibuprofen. Platelet dysfunction was apparent after completion of the ibuprofen course in 7 of the 11 participants and normalized by 24 hours after the last ibuprofen dose.The sample size in this study was small

2005 Annals of Internal Medicine

94. A meta-analysis of ibuprofen versus indomethacin for closure of patent ductus arteriosus

A meta-analysis of ibuprofen versus indomethacin for closure of patent ductus arteriosus Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2005 DARE.

95. Prophylactic ibuprofen versus placebo in very premature infants: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. (PubMed)

Prophylactic ibuprofen versus placebo in very premature infants: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Patent ductus arteriosus is a common complication of prematurity that frequently requires surgical or medical treatment. The benefit of prophylactic treatment by indometacin, a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, remains uncertain compared with curative treatment. This benefit could be improved with ibuprofen, another cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor with fewer adverse effects than indometacin (...) on renal, mesenteric, and cerebral perfusion. We aimed to compare prophylactic and curative ibuprofen in the treatment of this abnormality in very premature infants.We did a randomised controlled trial in infants younger than 28 weeks of gestation, who were randomly assigned to receive either three doses of ibuprofen or placebo within 6 h of birth. After day 3, symptomatic patent ductus arteriosus was treated first by open curative ibuprofen, then back-up indometacin, surgery, or both. The primary

2004 Lancet

96. Prophylactic ibuprofen in premature infants: a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. (PubMed)

Prophylactic ibuprofen in premature infants: a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Ibuprofen is used for treatment and prevention of patent ductus arteriosus in low-birthweight infants. Its effects on regional circulations differ from those of indometacin. Because prophylactic indometacin reduces the frequency of severe intraventricular haemorrhage and patent ductus arteriosus, we aimed to study the efficacy of early ibuprofen in reducing these outcomes in a double (...) -blind, multicentre trial.Within 6 h after birth, 415 low-birthweight infants (gestational age <31 weeks) were randomly allocated ibuprofen-lysine (10 mg/kg then two doses of 5 mg/kg after 24 h and 48 h) or placebo intravenously. The primary outcome was occurrence of severe intraventricular haemorrhage; secondary outcomes were occurrence of patent ductus arteriosus and possible adverse effects of ibuprofen. Analysis was by intention to treat.17 (8%) of 205 infants assigned ibuprofen and 18 (9

2004 Lancet

97. Comparison of lumiracoxib with naproxen and ibuprofen in the Therapeutic Arthritis Research and Gastrointestinal Event Trial (TARGET), reduction in ulcer complications: randomised controlled trial. (PubMed)

Comparison of lumiracoxib with naproxen and ibuprofen in the Therapeutic Arthritis Research and Gastrointestinal Event Trial (TARGET), reduction in ulcer complications: randomised controlled trial. Cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX2)-selective inhibitors should reduce ulcer complications compared with non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but evidence is limited, and the possibility that these inhibitors increase cardiovascular events has been raised. The Therapeutic Arthritis Research (...) and Gastrointestinal Event Trial (TARGET) aimed to assess gastrointestinal and cardiovascular safety of the COX2 inhibitor lumiracoxib compared with two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, naproxen and ibuprofen.18325 patients age 50 years or older with osteoarthritis were randomised to lumiracoxib 400 mg once daily (n=9156), naproxen 500 mg twice daily (4754), or ibuprofen 800 mg three times daily (4415) for 52 weeks, in two substudies of identical design (lumiracoxib vs ibuprofen or naproxen). Randomisation

2004 Lancet

98. Comparison of lumiracoxib with naproxen and ibuprofen in the Therapeutic Arthritis Research and Gastrointestinal Event Trial (TARGET), cardiovascular outcomes: randomised controlled trial. (PubMed)

Comparison of lumiracoxib with naproxen and ibuprofen in the Therapeutic Arthritis Research and Gastrointestinal Event Trial (TARGET), cardiovascular outcomes: randomised controlled trial. The potential for cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX2)-selective inhibitors to increase the risk for myocardial infarction is controversial. The Therapeutic Arthritis Research and Gastrointestinal Event Trial (TARGET) aimed to assess gastrointestinal and cardiovascular safety of the COX2 inhibitor lumiracoxib compared (...) with two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, naproxen and ibuprofen.18325 patients age 50 years or older with osteoarthritis were randomised to lumiracoxib 400 mg once daily (n=9156), naproxen 500 mg twice daily (4754), or ibuprofen 800 mg three times daily (4415) in two substudies of identical design. Randomisation was stratified for low-dose aspirin use and age. The primary cardiovascular endpoint was the Antiplatelet Trialists' Collaboration endpoint of non-fatal and silent myocardial infarction

2004 Lancet

99. Is indomethacin or ibuprofen better for medical closure of the patent ductus arteriosus?

Is indomethacin or ibuprofen better for medical closure of the patent ductus arteriosus? BestBets: Is ibuprofen or indomethacin better for medical closure of the patent ductus arterious? Is ibuprofen or indomethacin better for medical closure of the patent ductus arterious? Report By: Erik N Swartz - Pediatric Cardiology Fellow Institution: University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada Date Submitted: 10th March 2003 Date Completed: 15th July 2004 Last Modified: 15th July 2004 Status: Green (complete (...) ) Three Part Question In [a preterm baby of gestational age less than or equal to 34 weeks] is [ibuprofen compared with indomethacin] equally efficacious at [treating echocardiographically proven patent ductus arteriosus and have fewer side effects]? Clinical Scenario A preterm baby of 28 weeks gestation with respiratory distress syndrome is admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit. On day 2 of life, the characteristic murmur or a patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is heard, with the diagnosis

2004 BestBETS

100. Effect of ibuprofen on cardioprotective effect of aspirin. (PubMed)

Effect of ibuprofen on cardioprotective effect of aspirin. Treatment with ibuprofen might limit the cardioprotective effects of aspirin. We aimed to assess whether patients with known cardiovascular disease who take low-dose aspirin and ibuprofen have increased risk of cardiovascular mortality. We studied 7107 patients who were discharged after first admission for cardiovascular disease between April, 1989, and April, 1997, and who were prescribed low-dose aspirin (<325 mg/day) and survived (...) for at least 1 month. Compared with those who used aspirin alone, patients taking aspirin plus ibuprofen had an increased risk of all-cause mortality (adjusted hazard ratio 1.93, 95% CI 1.30-2.87, p=0.0011) and cardiovascular mortality (1.73, 1.05-2.84, p=0.0305). Our finding lends support to the hypothesis that ibuprofen may interact with the cardioprotective effects of aspirin, at least in patients with established cardiovascular disease.

2003 Lancet