Latest & greatest articles for inequality

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This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on inequality and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Top results for inequality

181. Income inequality, individual income, and mortality in Danish adults: analysis of pooled data from two cohort studies. (PubMed)

Income inequality, individual income, and mortality in Danish adults: analysis of pooled data from two cohort studies. To analyse the association between area income inequality and mortality after adjustment for individual income and other established risk factors.Analysis of pooled data from two cohort studies. The relation between income inequality in small areas of residence (parishes) and individual mortality was examined with Cox proportional hazard analyses.Two population studies (...) conducted in Copenhagen, Denmark.13 710 women and 12 018 men followed for a mean of 12.8 years.All cause mortality.Age standardised mortality was highest in the parishes with the least equal income distribution. After adjustment for individual risk factors, parish income inequality was not associated with mortality, whereas individual household income was. Thus, individuals in the highest income quarter had lower mortality than those in the lowest quarter (adjusted hazard ratio for men 0.51 (95

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2002 BMJ

182. Relations of income inequality and family income to chronic medical conditions and mental health disorders: national survey. (PubMed)

Relations of income inequality and family income to chronic medical conditions and mental health disorders: national survey. To analyse the relation between geographical inequalities in income and the prevalence of common chronic medical conditions and mental health disorders, and to compare it with the relation between family income and these health problems.Nationally representative household telephone survey conducted in 1997-8.60 metropolitan areas or economic areas of the United States (...) .9585 adults who participated in the community tracking study.Self report of 17 common chronic medical conditions; current depressive disorder or anxiety disorder assessed by clinical screeners.A strong continuous association was seen between health and education or family income. No relation was found between income inequality and the prevalence of chronic medical problems or depressive disorders and anxiety disorders, either across the whole population or among poorer people. Only self reported

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2002 BMJ

183. Education, income inequality, and mortality: a multiple regression analysis. (PubMed)

Education, income inequality, and mortality: a multiple regression analysis. To test whether the relation between income inequality and mortality found in US states is because of different levels of formal education.Cross sectional, multiple regression analysis.All US states and the District of Columbia (n=51).US census statistics and vital statistics for the years 1989 and 1990.Multiple regression analysis with age adjusted mortality from all causes as the dependent variable and 3 independent (...) variables-the Gini coefficient, per capita income, and percentage of people aged >/=18 years without a high school diploma.The income inequality effect disappeared when percentage of people without a high school diploma was added to the regression models. The fit of the regression significantly improved when education was added to the model.Lack of high school education accounts for the income inequality effect and is a powerful predictor of mortality variation among US states.

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2002 BMJ