Latest & greatest articles for inequality

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Top results for inequality

101. Inequalities in non-communicable diseases and effective responses. (PubMed)

Inequalities in non-communicable diseases and effective responses. In most countries, people who have a low socioeconomic status and those who live in poor or marginalised communities have a higher risk of dying from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) than do more advantaged groups and communities. Smoking rates, blood pressure, and several other NCD risk factors are often higher in groups with low socioeconomic status than in those with high socioeconomic status; the social gradient also depends (...) on the country's stage of economic development, cultural factors, and social and health policies. Social inequalities in risk factors account for more than half of inequalities in major NCDs, especially for cardiovascular diseases and lung cancer. People in low-income countries and those with low socioeconomic status also have worse access to health care for timely diagnosis and treatment of NCDs than do those in high-income countries or those with higher socioeconomic status. Reduction of NCDs

2013 Lancet

102. Identifying appropriate methods to incorporate concerns about health inequalities into economic evaluations of health care programmes

Identifying appropriate methods to incorporate concerns about health inequalities into economic evaluations of health care programmes First page footer Identifying appropriate methods to incorporate concerns about health inequalities into economic evaluations of health care programmes Final Report 3.02.14 Susan Griffin 1 ; Miqdad Asaria 1 ; Richard Cookson 1 ; Mark Sculpher 1 . 1 Centre for Health Economics, University of York The work was undertaken by the authors as part of the Public Health (...) Detailed description of project findings 9 2 Contribution to Consortium themes 9 2.1 Health inequalities 9 2.1.1 Methodological development 9 2.1.2 Translation to policy 9 References 10 Outputs / Dissemination 11 4 What this study adds: ? Reducing health inequality is a recognised goal of public policy, but changes to health inequality are not commonly incorporated in economic evaluations ? This study shows how health inequality impacts can be incorporated in economic evaluation in a way that clarifies

2013 Public Health Research Consortium

103. Persistent social inequalities in health: Insensitive outcomes, inadequate policies, or both? (Full text)

Persistent social inequalities in health: Insensitive outcomes, inadequate policies, or both? Persistent social inequalities in health: Insensitive outcomes, inadequate policies, or both? | SCPHRP Publication Information Date of Publication 01/03/2013 Link

2013 Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research & Policy PubMed

104. A cross-sectional pilot study of the Scottish early development instrument: a tool for addressing inequality

A cross-sectional pilot study of the Scottish early development instrument: a tool for addressing inequality A cross-sectional pilot study of the Scottish early development instrument: a tool for addressing inequality | SCPHRP Publication Information Date of Publication 17/12/2013 Link

2013 Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research & Policy

105. Ethnicity, detention and early intervention: reducing inequalities and improving outcomes for black and minority ethnic patients: the ENRICH programme, a mixed-methods study (Full text)

Ethnicity, detention and early intervention: reducing inequalities and improving outcomes for black and minority ethnic patients: the ENRICH programme, a mixed-methods study Ethnicity, detention and early intervention: reducing inequalities and improving outcomes for black and minority ethnic patients: the ENRICH programme, a mixed-methods study Journals Library An error has occurred in processing the XML document An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page

2013 NIHR HTA programme PubMed

106. Community engagement to reduce inequalities in health: a systematic review, meta-analysis and economic analysis

Community engagement to reduce inequalities in health: a systematic review, meta-analysis and economic analysis Community engagement to reduce inequalities in health: a systematic review, meta-analysis and economic analysis Community engagement to reduce inequalities in health: a systematic review, meta-analysis and economic analysis O'Mara-Eves A, Brunton G, McDaid D, Oliver S, Kavanagh J, Jamal F, Matosevic T, Harden A, Thomas J Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published (...) health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation O'Mara-Eves A, Brunton G, McDaid D, Oliver S, Kavanagh J, Jamal F, Matosevic T, Harden A, Thomas J. Community engagement to reduce inequalities in health: a systematic review, meta-analysis and economic analysis. Public Health Research 2013; 1(4) Authors' objectives To undertake a multimethod systematic review which builds on the evidence that underpins

2013 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

107. Community engagement to reduce inequalities in health: a systematic review, meta-analysis and economic analysis

Community engagement to reduce inequalities in health: a systematic review, meta-analysis and economic analysis Community engagement to reduce inequalities in health: a systematic review, meta-analysis and economic analysis Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page from the navigation or try a website search above to find the information

2013 NIHR HTA programme

108. Impact on health inequalities of rising prosperity in England 1998-2007, and implications for performance incentives: longitudinal ecological study. (Full text)

Impact on health inequalities of rising prosperity in England 1998-2007, and implications for performance incentives: longitudinal ecological study. To investigate whether the uneven rise in prosperity between 1999 and 2008 accounted for differential increases in life expectancy in English local authorities.Longitudinal ecological study.324 local authorities in England, classified by their baseline level of deprivation. M: ain outcome measures Multivariable regression was used to investigate (...) the association between trends in prosperity between 1998 and 2007 and trends in life expectancy. Trends in health inequalities were assessed by comparing the experience of Spearhead local authorities (the 70 most deprived in 1998) with the average for all English local authorities.Those local authorities that experienced the greatest improvement in prosperity experienced greater increases in life expectancy. With each 1% absolute decline in unemployment, life expectancy increased by 2.2 (95% confidence

2012 BMJ PubMed

109. Use of relative and absolute effect measures in reporting health inequalities: structured review. (Full text)

Use of relative and absolute effect measures in reporting health inequalities: structured review. To examine the frequency of reporting of absolute and relative effect measures in health inequalities research.Structured review of selected general medical and public health journals.344 articles published during 2009 in American Journal of Epidemiology, American Journal of Public Health, BMJ, Epidemiology, International Journal of Epidemiology, JAMA, Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health (...) % (258/344) of all articles reported only relative measures in the full text; among these, 46% (119/258) contained no information on absolute baseline risks that would facilitate calculation of absolute effect measures. 18% (61/344) of all articles reported only absolute measures in the full text, and 7% (25/344) reported both absolute and relative measures. These results were consistent across journals, exposures, and outcomes.Health inequalities are most commonly reported using only relative

2012 BMJ PubMed

110. Contribution of modifiable risk factors to social inequalities in type 2 diabetes: prospective Whitehall II cohort study. (Full text)

Contribution of modifiable risk factors to social inequalities in type 2 diabetes: prospective Whitehall II cohort study. To assess the contribution of modifiable risk factors to social inequalities in the incidence of type 2 diabetes when these factors are measured at study baseline or repeatedly over follow-up and when long term exposure is accounted for.Prospective cohort study with risk factors (health behaviours (smoking, alcohol consumption, diet, and physical activity), body mass index (...) 1.48), and 45% (28% to 75%) when long term exposure over the follow-up was accounted for (attenuated hazard ratio 1.41). With additional adjustment for biological risk markers, a total of 53% (29% to 88%) of the socioeconomic differential was explained (attenuated hazard ratio 1.35, 1.05 to 1.72).Modifiable risk factors such as health behaviours and obesity, when measured repeatedly over time, explain almost half of the social inequalities in incidence of type 2 diabetes. This is more than was seen

2012 BMJ PubMed

111. Trends in socioeconomic inequalities in risk of sudden infant death syndrome, other causes of infant mortality, and stillbirth in Scotland: population based study. (Full text)

Trends in socioeconomic inequalities in risk of sudden infant death syndrome, other causes of infant mortality, and stillbirth in Scotland: population based study. To compare changes in inequalities in sudden infant death syndrome with other causes of infant mortality and stillbirth in Scotland, 1985-2008.Retrospective cohort study.Scotland 1985-2008, analysed by four epochs of six years.Singleton births of infants with birth weight >500 g born at 28-43 weeks' gestation.Sudden infant death

2012 BMJ PubMed

112. Increasing incidence of serious infectious diseases and inequalities in New Zealand: a national epidemiological study. (PubMed)

Increasing incidence of serious infectious diseases and inequalities in New Zealand: a national epidemiological study. Although the burden of infectious diseases seems to be decreasing in developed countries, few national studies have measured the total incidence of these diseases. We aimed to develop and apply a robust systematic method for monitoring the epidemiology of serious infectious diseases.We did a national epidemiological study with all hospital admissions for infectious and non (...) admissions were the events of interest.Infectious diseases made the largest contribution to hospital admissions of any cause. Their contribution increased from 20·5% of acute admissions in 1989-93, to 26·6% in 2004-08. We noted clear ethnic and social inequalities in infectious disease risk. In 2004-08, the age-standardised rate ratio was 2·15 (95% CI 2·14-2·16) for Māori (indigenous New Zealanders) and 2·35 (2·34-2·37) for Pacific peoples compared with the European and other group. The ratio was 2·81 (2

2012 Lancet

113. Fair Enough? Inviting Inequities in State Health Benefits. (PubMed)

Fair Enough? Inviting Inequities in State Health Benefits. 22316422 2012 02 28 2012 02 23 1533-4406 366 8 2012 Feb 23 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Fair enough? Inviting inequities in state health benefits. 681-3 10.1056/NEJMp1200751 Ruger Jennifer Prah JP Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, USA. eng Journal Article 2012 02 08 United States N Engl J Med 0255562 0028-4793 AIM IM Health Policy Humans Insurance Benefits legislation & jurisprudence Insurance Coverage

2012 NEJM

114. Health inequalities: an Olympic-size challenge

Health inequalities: an Olympic-size challenge Health inequalities: an Olympic-size challenge | The King's Fund Main navigation Health and care services Leadership, systems and organisations Patients, people and society Policy, finance and performance Search term Apply Health inequalities: an Olympic-size challenge This content relates to the following topics: Share this content Authors The good news is that government interventions have had a positive impact on healthy living. The bad news

2012 The King's Fund

115. Human papilloma virus vaccination programs reduce health inequity in most scenarios: a simulation study

Human papilloma virus vaccination programs reduce health inequity in most scenarios: a simulation study Human papilloma virus vaccination programs reduce health inequity in most scenarios: a simulation study | SCPHRP Publication Information Date of Publication 31/10/2012 Link

2012 Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research & Policy

116. Health inequalities and population health

Health inequalities and population health Health inequalities and population health | Advice | NICE Health inequalities and population health Local government briefing [LGB4] Published date: October 2012 Advice Between 2012 and 2015 we developed a series of local government briefings for a range of public health topics. We no longer have the capacity to maintain these to an acceptable standard and the information is now out of date, so these were removed from our website on 30 March 2018

2012 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Advice

117. Strategies for reducing inequalities and improving developmental outcomes for young children in low-income and middle-income countries. (Full text)

Strategies for reducing inequalities and improving developmental outcomes for young children in low-income and middle-income countries. This report is the second in a Series on early child development in low-income and middle-income countries and assesses the effectiveness of early child development interventions, such as parenting support and preschool enrolment. The evidence reviewed suggests that early child development can be improved through these interventions, with effects greater (...) for programmes of higher quality and for the most vulnerable children. Other promising interventions for the promotion of early child development include children's educational media, interventions with children at high risk, and combining the promotion of early child development with conditional cash transfer programmes. Effective investments in early child development have the potential to reduce inequalities perpetuated by poverty, poor nutrition, and restricted learning opportunities. A simulation model

2011 Lancet PubMed

118. Inequality in early childhood: risk and protective factors for early child development. (PubMed)

Inequality in early childhood: risk and protective factors for early child development. Inequality between and within populations has origins in adverse early experiences. Developmental neuroscience shows how early biological and psychosocial experiences affect brain development. We previously identified inadequate cognitive stimulation, stunting, iodine deficiency, and iron-deficiency anaemia as key risks that prevent millions of young children from attaining their developmental potential

2011 Lancet

119. The growing global health inequality of new drugs and clinical trials

The growing global health inequality of new drugs and clinical trials The growing global health inequality of new drugs and clinical trials | TrustTheEvidence.net Syndicate Discover the truth behind the research findings that affect everyday healthcare. » » Links Tags HONcode Certified This site complies with the for trustworthy health information: . The growing global health inequality of new drugs and clinical trials Ami Banerjee Last edited 30th August 2011 At the European Cardiology (...) than 50% even in rich countries. In Africa, 80% of eligible patients were taking no drugs at all. As Salim Yusuf said, treatment gaps like this in the HIV/AIDS epidemic led to human rights arguments for broadening of antiretroviral treatment and mobilisation of the global health community and governments. The inequality was also visible at concurrent “Meet the Triallists” sessions. Delegates clamoured to get to the trial update for the ARISTOTLE trial of the novel anticoagulant, apixaban, but I

2011 TrustTheEvidence

120. Obesity: Inequalities in EBM, medical research and policy

Obesity: Inequalities in EBM, medical research and policy Obesity: Inequalities in EBM, medical research and policy | TrustTheEvidence.net Syndicate Discover the truth behind the research findings that affect everyday healthcare. » » Links Tags HONcode Certified This site complies with the for trustworthy health information: . Obesity: Inequalities in EBM, medical research and policy Ami Banerjee Last edited 26th August 2011 Today’s main news story is that and will continue to rise (...) and global health policymakers put evidence into practice? Evidence-based medicine aims, at the end of the day, to institute changes which make the health of individuals better. It seems that there are inequalities in the way evidence is put into practice, based not just on societal interests, but on conflicts of interest, particularly multi-billion dollar industries. If we are serious about EBM and , we should take lessons learned from other sectors and apply them accordingly. Tags: to post comments

2011 TrustTheEvidence