Latest & greatest articles for low back pain

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Top results for low back pain

621. Group education interventions for people with low back pain: an overview of the literature

Group education interventions for people with low back pain: an overview of the literature Group education interventions for people with low back pain: an overview of the literature Group education interventions for people with low back pain: an overview of the literature Cohen J E, Goel V, Frank J W, Bombardier C, Peloso P, Guillemin F Authors' objectives To make a recommendation regarding the effectiveness of group education as an intervention for people with lower-back pain. Searching (...) searched over different time periods. The group education interventions were not of uniform high quality. Only 2 out of 13 interventions were rated as either good or very good by both expert reviewers. Generally, the interventions were insufficiently described. Bibliographic details Cohen J E, Goel V, Frank J W, Bombardier C, Peloso P, Guillemin F. Group education interventions for people with low back pain: an overview of the literature. Spine 1994; 19(11): 1214-1222 PubMedID Indexing Status Subject

1994 DARE.

622. A controlled trial of corticosteroid injections into facet joints for chronic low back pain. (PubMed)

A controlled trial of corticosteroid injections into facet joints for chronic low back pain. Chronic low back pain is a common problem with many treatments, few of which have been rigorously evaluated. This randomized, placebo-controlled trial was designed to evaluate the efficacy of injections of corticosteroid into facet joints to treat chronic low back pain.Patients with chronic low back pain who reported immediate relief of their pain after injections of local anesthetic into the facet (...) in the treatment of patients with chronic low back pain.

1991 NEJM

623. Low back pain of mechanical origin: randomised comparison of chiropractic and hospital outpatient treatment. (PubMed)

Low back pain of mechanical origin: randomised comparison of chiropractic and hospital outpatient treatment. To compare chiropractic and hospital outpatient treatment for managing low back pain of mechanical origin.Randomised controlled trial. Allocation to chiropractic or hospital management by minimisation to establish groups for analysis of results according to initial referral clinic, length of current episode, history, and severity of back pain. Patients were followed up for up two (...) flexion.Chiropractic treatment was more effective than hospital outpatient management, mainly for patients with chronic or severe back pain. A benefit of about 7% points on the Oswestry scale was seen at two years. The benefit of chiropractic treatment became more evident throughout the follow up period. Secondary outcome measures also showed that chiropractic was more beneficial.For patients with low back pain in whom manipulation is not contraindicated chiropractic almost certainly confers worthwhile, long term

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1990 BMJ

624. A controlled trial of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and exercise for chronic low back pain. (PubMed)

A controlled trial of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and exercise for chronic low back pain. A number of treatments are widely prescribed for chronic back pain, but few have been rigorously evaluated. We examined the effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), a program of stretching exercises, or a combination of both for low back pain. Patients with chronic low back pain (median duration, 4.1 years) were randomly assigned to receive daily treatment (...) , however, most patients had discontinued the exercises, and the initial improvements were gone. We conclude that for patients with chronic low back pain, treatment with TENS is no more effective than treatment with a placebo, and TENS adds no apparent benefit to that of exercise alone.

1990 NEJM

625. Clinical trial of intensive muscle training for chronic low back pain. (PubMed)

Clinical trial of intensive muscle training for chronic low back pain. 105 patients who had chronic low back pain without clinical signs of lumbar nerve root compression or radiological evidence of spondylolysis or osteomalacia were randomised to three treatments: 30 sessions of intensive dynamic back extensor exercises over three months; a similar programme at one-fifth the exercise intensity; or one month of thermotherapy, massage, and mild exercises. The results consistently favoured

1989 Lancet

626. A new approach to the treatment of chronic low back pain. (PubMed)

A new approach to the treatment of chronic low back pain. 81 patients with chronic low back pain (average duration 10 years) were randomised to two treatment groups. 40 received an empirically devised regimen of forceful spinal manipulation and injections of a dextrose-glycerine-phenol ("proliferant") solution into soft-tissue structures, as part of a programme to decrease pain and disability. The other 41 patients received parallel treatment in which the main differences were less extensive (...) and the numbers free from disability were 15 and 4, respectively (p less than 0.003). Visual analogue pain scores and pain diagrams likewise showed significant advantages for the experimental regimen.

1987 Lancet

627. How many days of bed rest for acute low back pain? A randomized clinical trial. (PubMed)

How many days of bed rest for acute low back pain? A randomized clinical trial. Bed rest is usually recommended for acute low back pain. Although the optimal duration of bed rest is uncertain, a given prescription may directly affect the number of days lost from work or other activities. In a randomized trial, we compared the consequences of recommending two days of bed rest (Group I) with those of recommending seven days (Group II). The subjects were 203 walk-in patients with mechanical low (...) . For many patients without neuromotor deficits, clinicians may be able to recommend two days of bed rest rather than longer periods, without any perceptible difference in clinical outcome. If widely applied, this policy might substantially reduce absenteeism from work and the resulting indirect costs of low back pain for both patients and employers.

1986 NEJM

628. Controlled comparison of short-wave diathermy treatment with osteopathic treatment in non-specific low back pain. (PubMed)

Controlled comparison of short-wave diathermy treatment with osteopathic treatment in non-specific low back pain. The effectiveness of spinal manipulation carried out by a non-medical qualified osteopath was compared with that of short-wave diathermy (SWD) and a placebo (detuned SWD) in 109 patients with low back pain. More than half the subjects in each of the 3 treatment groups benefited immediately from therapy. Significant improvements were observed in the 3 groups at the end of 2 weeks (...) ' treatment, and these were still apparent at 12 weeks. The outcome of treatment was unrelated to the initial severity or duration of pain or to the trend of pain towards deterioration or improvement. It is, therefore, unlikely that the results simply reflect the natural history of low back pain. Benefits obtained with osteopathy and SWD in this study may have been achieved through a placebo effect.

1985 Lancet

629. Spinal manipulation for low back pain. (PubMed)

Spinal manipulation for low back pain. A randomized clinical trial of rotational manipulation was conducted on 95 patients with low back pain selected for (1) the absence of any contraindications for vertebral manipulation, (2) the absence of any psychosocial problems that might affect the outcome of treatment, (3) the absence of any previous experience with manipulative therapy, and (4) the presence of palpatory cues indicating that manipulation might be successful. Patients were randomly

1981 JAMA