Latest & greatest articles for lung cancer

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on lung cancer or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on lung cancer and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Top results for lung cancer

1381. Intrapleural BCG in operable lung cancer. (PubMed)

Intrapleural BCG in operable lung cancer. In a controlled randomised clinical trial of 92 patients with surgically resected lung cancer, intrapleural BCG had no clear effect on survival. Adverse effects were insignificant.

1980 Lancet

1382. Thymosin fraction V and intensive combination chemotherapy. Prolonging the survival of patients with small-cell lung cancer. (PubMed)

Thymosin fraction V and intensive combination chemotherapy. Prolonging the survival of patients with small-cell lung cancer. Patients with small-cell bronchogenic carcinoma who received intensive remission-induction chemotherapy randomly received either thymosin fraction V, 60 mg/sq m or 20 mg/sq m twice weekly, or no thymosin treatment during the initial six weeks of chemotherapy. Chemotherapy was then continued for two years. Thymosin administration did not increase the complete response rate

1979 JAMA

1383. Regional immunotherapy of lung cancer with intrapleural B.C.G. (PubMed)

Regional immunotherapy of lung cancer with intrapleural B.C.G. 60 patients have been entered into a randomised prospective study to answer the question-does a single postoperative injection of B.C.G. into the pleural space improve survival after surgery for lung cancer? 40 patients have been followed up for more than a year. B.C.G. improved survival in patients with a limited tumour burden: there were no recurrences and no deaths in 17 stage-I patients treated with intrapleural B.C.G. whereas 9 (...) of 22 comparable control patients developed recurrent cancer and 5 died in the same interval (p=0.003). Intrapleural B.C.G. treatment did not seem to be beneficial in patients with more advanced disease. The hazards associated with injecting these living organisms into the pleural space have been reduced by preclinical laboratory testing in animals, use of a single limited dose of microorganisms, administration of isoniazid, and careful patient monitoring.

1976 Lancet

1384. A 5-year controlled study of B.C.G. and radiotherapy inoperable lung cancer. (PubMed)

A 5-year controlled study of B.C.G. and radiotherapy inoperable lung cancer. Forty-eight patients with advanced squamous-cell lung cancer were treated with radical radiotherapy. Thereafter twenty-five received B.C.G. regularly and twenty-three did not. Differences in survival during the first year of observation and absence of peripheral metastases were significantly in favour of the patients treated with B.C.G. There was no response to B.C.G. in patients receiving palliative radiotherapy

1976 Lancet