Latest & greatest articles for nursing

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on nursing or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on nursing and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Top results for nursing

1161. Work-site treatment of hypertension by specially trained nurses. A controlled trial. (PubMed)

Work-site treatment of hypertension by specially trained nurses. A controlled trial. The clinical efficacy of using specially trained nurses to treat hypertension at the patient's place of work was compared in a controlled trial with management by the patient's family doctor. The 457 study participants were selected from 21 906 volunteers in industry and government whose blood-pressure was screened. The nurses were allowed to prescribe and change drug therapy at the work site without prior (...) physician approval. Patients randomly allocated to receive care at work were significantly more likely to be put on antihypertensive medications (94.7% vs 62.7%, to reach goal blood-pressure in the first six months (48.5% vs 27.5%), and to take the drugs prescribed (67.6% vs 49.1%). Only 6% of patients were dissatisfied with the care provided by the nurses. Thus provision of care at work by specially tranined nurses was well accepted and resulted in significantly improved blood-pressure control

1979 Lancet

1162. Efficiency and cost of primary care by nurses and physician assistants. (PubMed)

Efficiency and cost of primary care by nurses and physician assistants. We conducted a prospective study in a prepaid primary-care practice (health-maintenance organization) of a system in which nurses and physician assistants used protocols, and compared the efficiency and costs of this "new-health-practitioner" protocol system to a physician-only nonprotocol system. In five months, we studied 472 patients with any of four common acute complaints--respiratory infections, urinary and vaginal

1978 NEJM

1163. The Burlington randomized trial of the nurse practitioner: health outcomes of patients. (PubMed)

The Burlington randomized trial of the nurse practitioner: health outcomes of patients. 4811789 1974 04 02 2009 10 27 0003-4819 80 2 1974 Feb Annals of internal medicine Ann. Intern. Med. The Burlington randomized trial of the nurse practitioner: health outcomes of patients. 137-42 Sackett D L DL Spitzer W O WO Gent M M Roberts R S RS eng Clinical Trial Journal Article Randomized Controlled Trial United States Ann Intern Med 0372351 0003-4819 AIM IM Adolescent Adult Aged Child Child, Preschool (...) Delivery of Health Care Emotions Factor Analysis, Statistical Female Humans Infant Male Middle Aged Mortality Nurse Practitioners standards Ontario Physical Examination Physical Fitness Primary Health Care standards Quality of Health Care Social Behavior Time Factors Vision, Ocular 1974 2 1 1974 2 1 0 1 1974 2 1 0 0 ppublish 4811789

1974 Annals of Internal Medicine