Latest & greatest articles for obesity

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This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on obesity and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Top results for obesity

1341. Error in blood-pressure measurement due to incorrect cuff size in obese patients. (PubMed)

Error in blood-pressure measurement due to incorrect cuff size in obese patients. Trained nurse-specialists obtained 84 000 blood-pressure measurements in 1240 obese subjects using cuffs of the three standard adult sizes in a randomised order. The differences in readings between the three cuffs were smallest in non-obese subjects and became progressively greater with increasing arm circumference (AC) in the obese population. The regular cuff (12 X 23 cm) showed the greatest bias in relation (...) to AC. Formulae and a table have been derived to correct the measurement error caused by cuffs of inappropriate size at various ACs. The reported high prevalence of hypertension in obese subjects may be greatly overestimated.

1982 Lancet

1342. Treatment of obesity with triiodothyronine and a very-low-calorie liquid formula diet. (PubMed)

Treatment of obesity with triiodothyronine and a very-low-calorie liquid formula diet. In a double-blind trial physiological doses (60 microgram/day) of triiodothyronine (T3) were compared with placebo in a group of obese patients on a 320 kcal/day (1.34 MJ) liquid formula diet. T3-treated patients had a significantly greater weight-loss by the 12th week. Analysis of serum levels of T3 and thyroxine (T4) showed that those patients in the placebo group whose weight-loss tended to level off (...) at a plateau towards the end of the trial also had the lowest T3 levels and resting metabolic rate (RMR) at that time. Patients in the T3 group had a steady rise in serum T3 levels during the 12 wk period. Those with the highest final T3 levels had the greatest tendency for their weight-loss to level out and, paradoxically, had the least suppression of serum T4 levels and lowest RMR. Some obese patients who do not readily lose weight on conventional low-calorie diets may have an impaired metabolic

1980 Lancet

1343. Controlled trial of behaviour therapy, pharmacotherapy, and their combination in the treatment of obesity. (PubMed)

Controlled trial of behaviour therapy, pharmacotherapy, and their combination in the treatment of obesity. Behaviour therapy, pharmacotherapy, and a combination of the two were compared in 120 obese women and 14 obese men during six months of treatment for obesity and at one-year follow-up. Patients who received the appetite suppressant fenfluramine lost 14.5 kg and those who received the combined treatment lost 15.3 kg, both significantly more than those who received only behaviour therapy (...) of pharmacotherapy apparently compromised the long-term effects of behaviour therapy. Better maintenance of weight loss and lower costs favour behaviour therapy over pharmacotherapy for the treatment of obesity.

1980 Lancet

1344. Randomised trial of jejunoileal bypass versus medical treatment in morbid obesity. The Danish Obesity Project. (PubMed)

Randomised trial of jejunoileal bypass versus medical treatment in morbid obesity. The Danish Obesity Project. In a randomised clinical trial to assess the value of intestinal bypass in the treatment of gross obesity 130 patients who underwent end-to-side jejunoileostomy (with either a 1/3 or a 3/1 ratio between jejunum and ileum left in continuity) were compared with 66 non-surgically treated patients. All patients in the study had gross, long-standing, treatment-resistant obesity

1979 Lancet