Latest & greatest articles for overdiagnosis

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This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on overdiagnosis and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Top results for overdiagnosis

21. Overdiagnosis of invasive breast cancer due to mammography screening: results from the norwegian screening program. (PubMed)

Overdiagnosis of invasive breast cancer due to mammography screening: results from the norwegian screening program. Precise quantification of overdiagnosis of breast cancer (defined as the percentage of cases of cancer that would not have become clinically apparent in a woman's lifetime without screening) due to mammography screening has been hampered by lack of valid comparison groups that identify incidence trends attributable to screening versus those due to temporal trends in incidence.To (...) estimate the percentage of overdiagnosis of breast cancer attributable to mammography screening.Comparison of invasive breast cancer incidence with and without screening.A nationwide mammography screening program in Norway (inviting women aged 50 to 69 years), gradually implemented from 1996 to 2005.The Norwegian female population.Concomitant incidence of invasive breast cancer from 1996 to 2005 in counties where the screening program was implemented compared with that in counties where the program

2012 Annals of Internal Medicine

22. Overdiagnosis from non-progressive cancer detected by screening mammography: stochastic simulation study with calibration to population based registry data. (PubMed)

Overdiagnosis from non-progressive cancer detected by screening mammography: stochastic simulation study with calibration to population based registry data. To quantify the magnitude of overdiagnosis from non-progressive disease detected by screening mammography, after adjustment for the potential for lead time bias, secular trend in the underlying risk of breast cancer, and opportunistic screening.Approximate bayesian computation analysis with a stochastic simulation model designed (...) to replicate standardised incidence rates of breast cancer. The model components included the lifetime probability of breast cancer, the natural course of breast cancer, and participation in organised and opportunistic mammography screening.Isère, a French administrative region with nearly 1.2 million inhabitants.All women living in Isère and aged 50-69 during 1991-2006.Overdiagnosis, defined as the proportion of non-progressive cancers among all cases of invasive cancer and carcinoma in situ detected 1991

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2011 BMJ

23. Overdiagnosis in publicly organised mammography screening programmes: systematic review of incidence trends. (PubMed)

Overdiagnosis in publicly organised mammography screening programmes: systematic review of incidence trends. To estimate the extent of overdiagnosis (the detection of cancers that will not cause death or symptoms) in publicly organised screening programmes.Systematic review of published trends in incidence of breast cancer before and after the introduction of mammography screening.PubMed (April 2007), reference lists, and authors. Review methods One author extracted data on incidence of breast (...) both screened and non-screened age groups, were available from the United Kingdom; Manitoba, Canada; New South Wales, Australia; Sweden; and parts of Norway. The implementation phase with its prevalence peak was excluded and adjustment made for changing background incidence and compensatory drops in incidence among older, previously screened women. Overdiagnosis was estimated at 52% (95% confidence interval 46% to 58%). Data from three countries showed a drop in incidence as the women exceeded

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2009 BMJ

24. Overdiagnosis in publicly organised mammography screening programmes: systematic review of incidence trends

Overdiagnosis in publicly organised mammography screening programmes: systematic review of incidence trends Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2009 DARE.

25. Overdiagnosis of malaria in patients with severe febrile illness in Tanzania: a prospective study. (PubMed)

Overdiagnosis of malaria in patients with severe febrile illness in Tanzania: a prospective study. To study the diagnosis and outcomes in people admitted to hospital with a diagnosis of severe malaria in areas with differing intensities of malaria transmission.Prospective observational study of children and adults over the course a year.10 hospitals in north east Tanzania.17,313 patients were admitted to hospital; of these 4474 (2851 children aged under 5 years) fulfilled criteria for severe

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2004 BMJ