Latest & greatest articles for palliative care

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Top results for palliative care

81. Palliative Care for the Patient with Incurable Cancer or Advanced Disease: Part 1: Approach to Care

Palliative Care for the Patient with Incurable Cancer or Advanced Disease: Part 1: Approach to Care Guidelines & Protocols Advisory Committee Palliative Care for the Patient with Incurable Cancer or Advanced Disease Part 1: Approach to Care Effective Date: February 22, 2017 Scope This guideline presents palliative care assessment and management strategies for primary care practitioners caring for adult patients aged = 19 years with incurable cancer and end stage chronic disease of many types (...) , and their families. NOTE: Care gaps have been identified at important transitions for this group of patients: • upon receiving a diagnosis of incurable cancer; • when discharged from active treatment to the community; • while still ambulatory but needing pain and symptom management; and • at the transition when End-of-Life care may be needed. Diagnostic code: 239 (neoplasm of unspecified nature) Palliative care planning fee code: G14063 Key Recommendations • Identify patients who would benefit from palliative

2017 Clinical Practice Guidelines and Protocols in British Columbia

82. Palliative Care for the Patient with Incurable Cancer or Advanced Disease: Part 3: Grief and Bereavement

Palliative Care for the Patient with Incurable Cancer or Advanced Disease: Part 3: Grief and Bereavement Guidelines & Protocols Advisory Committee Palliative Care for the Patient with Incurable Cancer or Advanced Disease Part 3: Grief and Bereavement Effective Date: February 22, 2017 Scope This guideline addresses the needs of adult patients with incurable cancer or advanced disease (but can be useful for adults dying of any cause), as well as the needs of their caregivers or family, including (...) contacting the Physician Health Program. Refer to Associated Document: Resource Guide for Patients and Caregivers. BCGuidelines.ca: Palliative Care for the Patient with Incurable Cancer or Advanced Disease 2 Part 3: Grief and Bereavement (2017) Grief } Assessment of Grief • Consider using the Adult Attitudes to Grief Scale 3 (Appendix A: Adult Attitudes to Grief Scale – Patient Handout, Practitioner Score Sheet, and Protocol for Use). The Adult Attitudes to Grief Scale is a brief, self-reported, evidence

2017 Clinical Practice Guidelines and Protocols in British Columbia

83. Impact of intervention aimed at improving the integration of oncology units and local palliative care services: results of the multicentre prospective sequential MIRTO study (PubMed)

Impact of intervention aimed at improving the integration of oncology units and local palliative care services: results of the multicentre prospective sequential MIRTO study Chemotherapy (CT) in patients with advanced cancer (ACP) near the end of life is an increasing practice of oncology units. A closer integration with palliative care (PC) services could reduce the use of potentially harmful CT. This prospective study is aimed at assessing whether a more integrated care model could reduce CT

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2017 ESMO open

84. Palliative care in cancer: managing patients' expectations. (PubMed)

Palliative care in cancer: managing patients' expectations. Advanced cancer patients commonly have misunderstandings about the intentions of treatment and their overall prognosis. Several studies have shown that large numbers of patients receiving palliative radiation or chemotherapy hold unrealistic hopes of their cancer being cured by such therapies, which can affect their ability to make well-informed decisions about treatment options. This review aimed to explore this discrepancy between (...) . Communication styles have profound effects on patients' experience and treatment choices. Patients' views on disclosure are influenced by many cultural, psychological and illness-related factors, therefore individuals' needs must be considered when conveying prognostic information. More research is needed to identify communication barriers and the interventions that could be used to increase patients' satisfaction with palliative care.© 2016 The Authors. Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences published

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2017 Journal of medical radiation sciences

85. What is the value of palliative care provision in low-resource settings? (PubMed)

What is the value of palliative care provision in low-resource settings? 28588999 2018 11 13 2059-7908 2 1 2017 BMJ global health BMJ Glob Health What is the value of palliative care provision in low-resource settings? e000139 10.1136/bmjgh-2016-000139 Anderson R Eleanor RE Department of Emergency Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. Grant Liz L Global Health Academy, University of Edinburgh, FRCPE, Edinburgh, UK. eng Journal Article 2017 02 14 England BMJ (...) Glob Health 101685275 2059-7908 Competing interests: None declared. 2016 07 26 2016 11 03 2017 6 8 6 0 2017 6 8 6 0 2017 6 8 6 1 epublish 28588999 10.1136/bmjgh-2016-000139 bmjgh-2016-000139 PMC5335766 Afr J Prim Health Care Fam Med. 2014 Nov 14;6(1):E1-8 26245417 Lancet. 2013 Sep 21;382(9897):1060-9 23697823 J Pain Palliat Care Pharmacother. 2003;17(3-4):xxix-xxxvi 15022945 Lancet. 2016 May 21;387(10033):2133-44 26578033 Science. 2009 Oct 30;326(5953):682-8 19900925 Indian J Palliat Care. 2016 Jul

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2017 BMJ global health

87. Effects of Early Integrated Palliative Care in Patients With Lung and GI Cancer: A Randomized Clinical Trial

Effects of Early Integrated Palliative Care in Patients With Lung and GI Cancer: A Randomized Clinical Trial Purpose We evaluated the impact of early integrated palliative care (PC) in patients with newly diagnosed lung and GI cancer. Patients and Methods We randomly assigned patients with newly diagnosed incurable lung or noncolorectal GI cancer to receive either early integrated PC and oncology care (n = 175) or usual care (n = 175) between May 2011 and July 2015. Patients who were assigned (...) to the intervention met with a PC clinician at least once per month until death, whereas those who received usual care consulted a PC clinician upon request. The primary end point was change in quality of life (QOL) from baseline to week 12, per scoring by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General scale. Secondary end points included change in QOL from baseline to week 24, change in depression per the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and differences in end-of-life communication. Results Intervention

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2017 EvidenceUpdates

88. Advance care planning and palliative care

Advance care planning and palliative care Advance care planning and palliative care | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword (...) Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Advance care planning and palliative care Article Text This article has a correction. Please see: EBN perspective Advance care planning and palliative care Roberta Heale 1 , Helen Noble 2 Statistics from Altmetric.com EBN Perspectives brings together key issues from the commentaries in one of our nursing

2017 Evidence-Based Nursing

89. Palliative Care in the Outpatient Setting

Palliative Care in the Outpatient Setting ©Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, 2016 Palliative Care in the Outpatient Setting A Comparative Effectiveness Report Final Report April 27, 2016 Completed by: Institute for Clinical and Economic Review ©Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, 2016 Page i AUTHORS: Courtney Cunningham, MPH Program Director Karin Travers, DSc Research Director Rick Chapman, PhD, MS Director of Health Economics Anne Loos, MA Research Associate Erin Lawler, MA (...) Program and Communications Associate Shanshan Liu, MS, MPH Research Associate Steven D. Pearson, MD, MSc President Daniel A. Ollendorf, PhD Chief Scientific Officer DATE OF PUBLICATION: April 27, 2016 ICER would like to thank Rebecca Kirch, JD, Consultant to the Center to Advance Palliative Care for her peer review of the draft report. ©Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, 2016 Page ii About ICER The Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER) is an independent non-profit research

2017 California Technology Assessment Forum

94. Palliative care - nausea and vomiting

Palliative care - nausea and vomiting Palliative care - nausea and vomiting - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Summary Nausea is an unpleasant sensation of the need to vomit, which is often accompanied by autonomic symptoms (for example pallor, cold sweat, salivation, and tachycardia). Vomiting (emesis) is the forceful ejection of stomach contents through the mouth. There are many causes of nausea and vomiting in the palliative care setting (...) the stage of the person’s illness, their prognosis, the severity of their symptoms, and the wishes of the person and their family. Simple measures may help relieve nausea and vomiting in palliative care. They include: Ensuring access to a large bowl, tissues, and water. Eating snacks consisting of a few mouthfuls rather than large meals. Drinking cool fizzy drinks rather than still or hot drinks. Relaxation techniques. Parenteral hydration, if appropriate. Cognitive behavioural therapy (for anticipatory

2017 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

95. Palliative care - oral

Palliative care - oral Palliative care - oral - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Palliative care - oral: Summary Common oral problems in palliative care include dry mouth, painful mouth, halitosis, alteration of taste, and excessive salivation. They may result from poor oral intake, drug treatments, local irradiation, oral tumours, or chemotherapy. Oral symptoms may significantly affect the person's quality of life, causing eating, drinking, and communication problems, and oral (...) discomfort and pain. When assessing a person with oral symptoms in palliative care: Ask about dry mouth, oral pain, halitosis, alteration in taste, excessive salivation, bad breath, difficulty chewing, difficulty speaking, dysphagia, and bleeding. Examine the oral cavity for signs of dehydration, level of oral hygiene, ulceration and vesicles, erythema or white patches, local tumour, bleeding, and infection. The cause of most oral problems can be diagnosed on the basis of clinical features alone

2017 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

96. Palliative care - malignant skin ulcer

Palliative care - malignant skin ulcer Palliative care - malignant skin ulcer - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Palliative care - malignant skin ulcer: Summary A malignant ulcer is a proliferative or cavitating primary or secondary cancer in the skin. It may appear as a crater-like wound, a nodular 'fungus', or a 'cauliflower' lesion. Most malignant ulcers develop from a breast, head and neck, or skin cancer. Malignant ulcers are most likely to develop in people older than 70 years (...) of life as much as possible. Ensuring a professional with expertise in wound management is involved in the person's care (such as a district nurse, palliative care or tissue viability nurse). This professional can advise on the need for cleansing, debridement, and the correct selection and use of dressings. Referral where appropriate to an oncologist or palliative care specialist for advice if further cancer treatment is possible (such as radiotherapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, or surgical

2017 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

97. Palliative care - general issues

Palliative care - general issues Palliative care - general issues - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Palliative care - general issues: Summary Palliative care is defined as the active holistic care of people with advanced, progressive illness. Professionals providing general palliative care services should: Be involved as early as possible after diagnosis. Aim to meet the needs of the patient and their family within the limits of their knowledge and competence. Seek specialist advice (...) : Should be based on locally agreed protocols and guidelines, delivered within the context of a managed system or pathway. Requires a multidisciplinary team because of the potential multidimensional nature of problems in palliative care. Have I got the right topic? Have I got the right topic? From age 16 years onwards. This CKS topic covers the general management issues related to palliative care and incorporates guidance from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence on Improving

2017 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

98. Palliative care - dyspnoea

Palliative care - dyspnoea Palliative care - dyspnoea - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Palliative care - dyspnoea: Summary Breathlessness is an objective observable sign, whereas dyspnoea is a subjective described symptoms of difficulty in breathing. Anxiety is often a major component of dyspnoea. Dyspnoea can result from impaired ventilation or increased ventilatory demand, or both factors. There are multiple possible causes of dyspnoea in people with cancer, including: Direct (...) causes — such as primary lung cancer or lung metastases. Indirect effects of cancer — such as pleural effusion, superior vena cava syndrome, anaemia, pulmonary embolism, and surgery. Non-malignant causes — such as pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure, and anxiety. Assessment of someone with dyspnoea in a palliative care setting involves asking about: Features of the dyspnoea (for example severity, timing, onset, and precipitating and exacerbating factors). Associated

2017 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

99. Palliative care - cough

Palliative care - cough Palliative care - cough - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Palliative care - cough: Summary Cough is a defensive reflex that occurs in response to stimulation of irritant receptors which are found in the airways. It has two functions — to prevent foreign material entering the lower respiratory tract, and to clear secretions from the lungs and airways. Cough in people with cancer is most commonly associated with cancer of the airways, lungs, pleura (...) , and mediastinum, but tumours metastasizing to the thorax can also cause cough. In people with cancer, the most common cause of acute cough is respiratory tract infection. Other possible non-malignant causes include post-nasal drip, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. When assessing someone with cough in palliative care, the following should be elicited: The impact on the person's quality of life. The severity, time of onset, and duration of the cough

2017 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

100. Palliative care - constipation

Palliative care - constipation Palliative care - constipation - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Palliative care - constipation: Summary Constipation is defecation that is unsatisfactory because of infrequent stools, difficult stool passage, or seemingly incomplete defecation. Stools are often dry and hard, and may be abnormally large or abnormally small. About 80% of people with cancer will require treatment with laxatives at some time. People receiving palliative care have multiple (...) causes of constipation, such as: Drugs, for example, opioid analgesics, antimuscarinic drugs, antacids. Secondary effects of disease, for example, dehydration, inadequate dietary fibre, inactivity, delirium, spinal cord compression, lack of privacy. Direct effects of malignant tumours, causing bowel obstruction, hypercalcaemia, nerve damage. When assessing a person with constipation in palliative care: The history should include information about the frequency and character of stools, discomfort

2017 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries