Latest & greatest articles for palliative care

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This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on palliative care and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Top results for palliative care

161. Systematic review and meta-analysis: Home palliative care services increase the chance of adults with advanced illness dying at home and reduce symptom burden without impact on caregiver grief

Systematic review and meta-analysis: Home palliative care services increase the chance of adults with advanced illness dying at home and reduce symptom burden without impact on caregiver grief Home palliative care services increase the chance of adults with advanced illness dying at home and reduce symptom burden without impact on caregiver grief | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings (...) via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Home palliative care services increase

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2014 Evidence-Based Nursing

162. Palliative care consultation items

Palliative care consultation items Palliative care consultation items Palliative care consultation items Medical Services Advisory Committee Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Medical Services Advisory Committee. Palliative care consultation items. Canberra: Medical Services Advisory Committee (MSAC). MSAC application 1159. 2014 Authors' conclusions (...) After considering the strength of the available evidence in relation to the safety, clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of palliative care medicine consultation items MSAC considered that there was a lack of evidence to support the claim and that the nature of the application itself was outside MSAC's normal frame for consideration. MSAC, however, noted that there may be some benefit in the introduction of new complex assessment and treatment items for palliative medicine specialists

2014 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

163. Fentanyl transdermal patches in palliative care: clinical effectiveness, safety, and guidelines

Fentanyl transdermal patches in palliative care: clinical effectiveness, safety, and guidelines Fentanyl transdermal patches in palliative care: clinical effectiveness, safety, and guidelines Fentanyl transdermal patches in palliative care: clinical effectiveness, safety, and guidelines CADTH Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database (...) . Citation CADTH. Fentanyl transdermal patches in palliative care: clinical effectiveness, safety, and guidelines. Ottawa: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). Rapid Response. 2014 Authors' conclusions Two evidence-based guidelines regarding the use of fentanyl transdermal patches for pain relief in palliative care patients were identified. Final publication URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Administration, Cutaneous; Fentanyls; Palliative Care

2014 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

164. Qualitative study: Early ambulatory palliative care visits focus on psychosocial elements such as building rapport and coping, as well as managing symptoms and enhancing illness understanding

Qualitative study: Early ambulatory palliative care visits focus on psychosocial elements such as building rapport and coping, as well as managing symptoms and enhancing illness understanding Early ambulatory palliative care visits focus on psychosocial elements such as building rapport and coping, as well as managing symptoms and enhancing illness understanding | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your (...) care visits focus on psychosocial elements such as building rapport and coping, as well as managing symptoms and enhancing illness understanding Article Text Adult nursing Qualitative study Early ambulatory palliative care visits focus on psychosocial elements such as building rapport and coping, as well as managing symptoms and enhancing illness understanding Betty Ferrell Statistics from Altmetric.com Commentary on: Yoong J , Park ER , Greer JA , et al . Early palliative care in advanced lung

2014 Evidence-Based Nursing

165. Naloxone for Use in Long-term Care and Palliative Care: Clinical Effectiveness, Safety, and Guidelines

Naloxone for Use in Long-term Care and Palliative Care: Clinical Effectiveness, Safety, and Guidelines TITLE: Naloxone for Use in Long-term Care and Palliative Care: Clinical Effectiveness, Safety, and Guidelines DATE: 16 December 2013 RESEARCH QUESTIONS 1. What is the evidence for the clinical effectiveness and safety of naloxone to reverse the effects of narcotics in long-term care and palliative care patients? 2. What are the evidence-based guidelines for the use of naloxone to reverse (...) the effects of narcotics in long-term care and palliative care patients? KEY MESSAGE One evidence-based guideline was identified for the use of naloxone to reverse the effects of narcotics in long-term care and palliative care patients. No evidence was identified regarding the clinical effectiveness and safety of naloxone to reverse the effects of narcotics in long-term care and palliative care patients. METHODS A limited literature search was conducted on key resources including PubMed, The Cochrane

2014 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

166. Analgesia: use of patient/proxy patient controlled analgesia in palliative care

Analgesia: use of patient/proxy patient controlled analgesia in palliative care Analgesia: use of patient/proxy patient controlled analgesia in palliative care | Great Ormond Street Hospital Google Tag Manager Navigation Search Search You are here Analgesia: use of patient/proxy patient controlled analgesia in palliative care Analgesia: use of patient/proxy patient controlled analgesia in palliative care ; . These techniques are most commonly used following surgery ( ; ), but can also (...) to health care professionals, rather than being trained to take on the responsibility for administration of bolus doses of analgesia. Although this is entirely appropriate in a patient population who are opiate naïve and with limited pain experience, such as the majority of post-operative patients. The palliative care population who will be considered for PCA and PPCA have different characteristics. In this population, patients and parents/carers are experienced in both pain assessment and management

2014 Great Ormond Street Hospital

167. Early specialty palliative care - translating data in oncology into practice. (PubMed)

Early specialty palliative care - translating data in oncology into practice. 24328469 2013 12 19 2018 11 13 1533-4406 369 24 2013 Dec 12 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Early specialty palliative care--translating data in oncology into practice. 2347-51 10.1056/NEJMsb1305469 Parikh Ravi B RB From Harvard Medical School (R.B.P.) and Massachusetts General Hospital (J.S.T.) - both in Boston; the American Cancer Society, Washington, DC (R.A.K.); and Johns Hopkins University (...) , Baltimore (T.J.S.). Kirch Rebecca A RA Smith Thomas J TJ Temel Jennifer S JS eng P30 CA006973 CA NCI NIH HHS United States Journal Article United States N Engl J Med 0255562 0028-4793 AIM IM N Engl J Med. 2014 Mar 13;370(11):1074-5 24620887 N Engl J Med. 2014 Mar 13;370(11):1075 24620888 N Engl J Med. 2014 Mar 13;370(11):1075-6 24620886 Cost Savings Health Policy Humans Neoplasms therapy Palliative Care economics legislation & jurisprudence methods Quality of Life Time Factors United States 2013 12 17 6

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2013 NEJM

168. The role of healthcare support workers in providing palliative and end-of-life care in the community: a systematic literature review

The role of healthcare support workers in providing palliative and end-of-life care in the community: a systematic literature review The role of healthcare support workers in providing palliative and end-of-life care in the community: a systematic literature review The role of healthcare support workers in providing palliative and end-of-life care in the community: a systematic literature review Herber OR, Johnston BM CRD summary The authors explored the role, challenges and supporting factors (...) by healthcare support workers. Searching CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, MEDLINE, British Nursing Index, Web of Science and ASSIA were searched for studies published in English in peer-reviewed journals between 1990 and 2011. Search terms were reported. Reference lists were used to locate further studies. The International Journal of Palliative Nursing was handsearched. Study selection Eligible for inclusion were quantitative and qualitative studies that explored the role and associated challenges for health care

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2013 DARE.

169. A good death at home: home palliative care services keep people where they want to be

A good death at home: home palliative care services keep people where they want to be A good death at home: home palliative care services keep people where they want to be | Evidently Cochrane sharing the latest Cochrane Reviews Search Main menu Post navigation by Key message: There is good evidence that home palliative care increases the chance of dying at home and reduces symptom burden, especially for people with cancer, without increasing caregiver grief. Where would you prefer to die (...) , if you had an advanced illness? More than 50% of people say they would like to die at home, given the choice, but in many countries relatively few people do; just 21% in England in 2010, for example. The need for home palliative care services is increasing as the ageing population expands and an understanding of their impact on death at home and on things that matter to patients and their carers, such as how well symptoms are controlled and how they feel about their care, is important in working out

2013 Evidently Cochrane

170. Do community specialist palliative care services that provide home nursing increase rates of home death for people with life-limiting illnesses? A systematic review and meta-analysis of comparative studies

Do community specialist palliative care services that provide home nursing increase rates of home death for people with life-limiting illnesses? A systematic review and meta-analysis of comparative studies Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2013 DARE.

171. Pharmacological interventions for pruritus in adult palliative care patients. (PubMed)

Pharmacological interventions for pruritus in adult palliative care patients. Pruritus is not the most prevalent but one of the most puzzling symptoms in palliative care patients. It can cause considerable discomfort and has a major impact on patients' quality of life. In the field of palliative care, pruritus is a symptom occurring in patients with disparate underlying diseases and based on different pathologic mechanisms but ending in the same phenomenon. The pathogenesis of pruritus (...) is complex and not fully elucidated. Thus, it is still very difficult to treat pruritus effectively. Evidence-based treatment approaches are needed.The objective was to evaluate the efficacy of different pharmacological treatments for preventing or treating pruritus in adult palliative care patients.A systematic literature search up to January 2012 was performed and it was updated in August 2012. The following databases were searched: The Cochrane Library (CENTRAL, DARE, CDSR) (2012, issue 8 of 12

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2013 Cochrane

172. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of home palliative care services for adults with advanced illness and their caregivers. (PubMed)

Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of home palliative care services for adults with advanced illness and their caregivers. Extensive evidence shows that well over 50% of people prefer to be cared for and to die at home provided circumstances allow choice. Despite best efforts and policies, one-third or less of all deaths take place at home in many countries of the world.1. To quantify the effect of home palliative care services for adult patients with advanced illness and their family (...) caregivers on patients' odds of dying at home; 2. to examine the clinical effectiveness of home palliative care services on other outcomes for patients and their caregivers such as symptom control, quality of life, caregiver distress and satisfaction with care; 3. to compare the resource use and costs associated with these services; 4. to critically appraise and summarise the current evidence on cost-effectiveness.We searched 12 electronic databases up to November 2012. We checked the reference lists

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2013 Cochrane

173. Levomepromazine for nausea and vomiting in palliative care. (PubMed)

Levomepromazine for nausea and vomiting in palliative care. Nausea and vomiting are common, distressing symptoms for patients receiving palliative care. There are several agents which can be used to treat these symptoms. Levomepromazine is an antipsychotic drug which is commonly used to alleviate nausea and vomiting in palliative care settings.To evaluate the efficacy of and adverse events (both minor and serious) associated with the use of levomepromazine for the treatment of nausea (...) and vomiting in palliative care patients.We searched the electronic databases including CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE using relevant search terms and synonyms in March 2013.Randomised controlled trials of levomepromazine for the treatment of nausea or vomiting, or both, for adults receiving palliative care. Studies where symptoms were thought to be due to pregnancy or surgery were excluded.The potential relevance of studies was assessed based on titles and abstracts. Any study reports which appeared to meet

2013 Cochrane

174. Generalist plus Specialist Palliative Care - Creating a More Sustainable Model. (PubMed)

Generalist plus Specialist Palliative Care - Creating a More Sustainable Model. 23465068 2013 04 04 2018 12 02 1533-4406 368 13 2013 Mar 28 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Generalist plus specialist palliative care--creating a more sustainable model. 1173-5 10.1056/NEJMp1215620 Quill Timothy E TE Department of Medicine, Palliative Care Division, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA. Abernethy Amy P AP eng Journal Article 2013 03 06 United States N Engl (...) J Med 0255562 0028-4793 AIM IM J Clin Anesth. 2014 Sep;26(6):429-31 25200705 Curriculum Fellowships and Scholarships Humans Palliative Care standards Specialization Specialty Boards United States Workforce 2013 3 8 6 0 2013 3 8 6 0 2013 4 5 6 0 ppublish 23465068 10.1056/NEJMp1215620

2013 NEJM

175. Midhurst Macmillan Community Specialist Palliative Care Service

Midhurst Macmillan Community Specialist Palliative Care Service Midhurst Macmillan Community Specialist Palliative Care Service | The King's Fund Main navigation Health and care services Leadership, systems and organisations Patients, people and society Policy, finance and performance Search term Apply Midhurst Macmillan Community Specialist Palliative Care Service: Delivering end-of-life care in the community This content relates to the following topics: Share this content Related details (...) Authors Publication details Pages 34 This case study looks at the Midhurst Macmillan Service – a community-based, consultant-led, specialist palliative care service in a rural community in the south of England. The service covers approximately 150,000 people across three counties – Surrey, Hampshire and West Sussex. It is jointly funded by the NHS and Macmillan Cancer Support up to a total value of £1.2 million per year. This case study is part of a in the United States to compare five successful UK

2013 The King's Fund

176. Naloxone for use in long-term care and palliative care: clinical effectiveness, safety, and guidelines

Naloxone for use in long-term care and palliative care: clinical effectiveness, safety, and guidelines Naloxone for use in long-term care and palliative care: clinical effectiveness, safety, and guidelines Naloxone for use in long-term care and palliative care: clinical effectiveness, safety, and guidelines CADTH Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made (...) for the HTA database. Citation CADTH. Naloxone for use in long-term care and palliative care: clinical effectiveness, safety, and guidelines. Ottawa: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). Rapid Response - Reference List. 2013 Authors' conclusions One evidence-based guideline was identified for the use of naloxone to reverse the effects of narcotics in long-term care and palliative care patients. No evidence was identified regarding the clinical effectiveness and safety of naloxone

2013 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

177. Transitions to palliative care for older people in acute hospitals: a mixed-methods study

Transitions to palliative care for older people in acute hospitals: a mixed-methods study Transitions to palliative care for older people in acute hospitals: a mixed-methods study Transitions to palliative care for older people in acute hospitals: a mixed-methods study Gott M, Ingleton C, Gardiner C, Richards N, Cobb M, Ryan A, Noble B, Bennett M, Seymour J, Ward S, Parker C Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA (...) . No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Gott M, Ingleton C, Gardiner C, Richards N, Cobb M, Ryan A, Noble B, Bennett M, Seymour J, Ward S, Parker C. Transitions to palliative care for older people in acute hospitals: a mixed-methods study. Health Services and Delivery Research 2013; 1(11) Authors' objectives (1) to explore how transitions to a palliative care approach are managed and experienced in acute hospitals and to identify best practice from

2013 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

178. Palliative Care

Palliative Care Guidelines | ICSI The MN Health Collaborative includes physicians and other representatives from major healthcare organizations working together to address major health topics affecting Minnesota communities today. ICSI has been developing evidence-based clinical practice guidelines to improve patient care since 1993. ICSI helps forward-focused Minnesota health organizations find ways to redefine and redesign systems and the market. Together, we aim to improve care and reduce (...) patients at risk for osteoporosis, as well as identification and treatment of those patients with osteoporosis. August 28, 2017 "/> Assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of acute, subacute, and chronic pain in ambulatory settings. November 21, 2013 "/> This guideline will assist primary and specialty care providers in identifying and caring for adult patients with a serious (potentially life-limiting, life-threatening or chronic, progressive) illness who may benefit from palliative care. April 1, 2014

2013 Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement

179. Pediatric palliative care in Canada and the United States: a qualitative metasummary of the needs of patients and families

Pediatric palliative care in Canada and the United States: a qualitative metasummary of the needs of patients and families Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2013 DARE.

180. Methylnaltrexone for treating opioid-induced bowel dysfunction in people with advanced illness receiving palliative care (terminated appraisal) (TA277)

Methylnaltrexone for treating opioid-induced bowel dysfunction in people with advanced illness receiving palliative care (terminated appraisal) (TA277) Overview | Methylnaltrexone for treating opioid-induced bowel dysfunction in people with advanced illness receiving palliative care (terminated appraisal) | Guidance | NICE Methylnaltrexone for treating opioid-induced bowel dysfunction in people with advanced illness receiving palliative care (terminated appraisal) Technology appraisal [TA277 (...) ] Published date: 27 March 2013 Share Guidance NICE is unable to recommend the use in the NHS of methylnaltrexone for treating opioid-induced bowel dysfunction in people with advanced illness receiving palliative care because no evidence submission was received from the manufacturer of the technology. Explore © NICE [year]. All rights reserved. Subject to .

2013 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Technology Appraisals