Latest & greatest articles for prostate cancer screening

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Top results for prostate cancer screening

42. Screening for Prostate Cancer with Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Testing PCO (Full text)

Screening for Prostate Cancer with Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Testing PCO Screening for Prostate Cancer With Prostate-Specific Antigen Testing: American Society of Clinical Oncology Provisional Clinical Opinion | Journal of Clinical Oncology Search in: Menu Article Tools ASCO SPECIAL ARTICLE Article Tools OPTIONS & TOOLS COMPANION ARTICLES No companion articles ARTICLE CITATION DOI: 10.1200/JCO.2012.43.3441 Journal of Clinical Oncology - published online before print July 16, 2012 PMID (...) : Screening for Prostate Cancer With Prostate-Specific Antigen Testing: American Society of Clinical Oncology Provisional Clinical Opinion x Ethan Basch , x Thomas K. Oliver , x Andrew Vickers , x Ian Thompson , x Philip Kantoff , x Howard Parnes , x D. Andrew Loblaw , x Bruce Roth , x James Williams , x Robert K. Nam Ethan Basch and Andrew Vickers, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; Thomas K. Oliver, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA; Ian Thompson, University

2012 American Society of Clinical Oncology Guidelines PubMed

43. Prostate Cancer: Screening

Prostate Cancer: Screening Final Update Summary: Prostate Cancer: Screening - US Preventive Services Task Force Search USPSTF Website Text size: Assembly version: 1.0.0.308 Last Build: 11/16/2018 6:27:19 PM You are here: Final Update Summary : Final Update Summary Archived: Prostate Cancer: Screening Original Release Date: May 2012 This version of this topic is currently archived and inactive. It should be used for historical purposes only. Archived: Recommendation Summary Population (...) Recommendation Grade Men The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends against prostate-specific antigen (PSA)–based screening for prostate cancer. ( ) Archived: Related Information for Consumers Archived: Related Information for Health Professionals Archived: Supporting Documents ( ) ( ) ( ) Archived: Clinical Summary Clinical summaries are one-page documents that provide guidance to primary care clinicians for using recommendations in practice. This summary is intended for use by primary care

2012 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

44. Cohort study: Cohort analysis finds that the proportion of people who meet high risk criteria for colorectal, breast or prostate cancer screening based on family history increases between age 30 and 50

Cohort study: Cohort analysis finds that the proportion of people who meet high risk criteria for colorectal, breast or prostate cancer screening based on family history increases between age 30 and 50 Cohort analysis finds that the proportion of people who meet high risk criteria for colorectal, breast or prostate cancer screening based on family history increases between age 30 and 50 | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising (...) Cohort analysis finds that the proportion of people who meet high risk criteria for colorectal, breast or prostate cancer screening based on family history increases between age 30 and 50 Article Text Therapeutics Cohort study Cohort analysis finds that the proportion of people who meet high risk criteria for colorectal, breast or prostate cancer screening based on family history increases between age 30 and 50 Harvey J Murff Statistics from Altmetric.com Commentary on: Ziogas A , Horick NK , Kinney

2012 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

45. Screening for prostate cancer: a review of the evidence for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Full text)

Screening for prostate cancer: a review of the evidence for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Screening for prostate cancer: a review of the evidence for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Screening for prostate cancer: a review of the evidence for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Chou R, Croswell JM, Dana T, Bougatsos C, Blazina I, Fu R, Gleitsmann K, Koenig HC, Lam C, Maltz A, Rugge B, Lin K CRD summary This review concluded that it was uncertain whether prostate-specific (...) antigen-based screening reduced prostate cancer mortality. Screening was associated with false-positive results and adverse events related to subsequent evaluation and treatment. The authors' conclusions seem appropriate, although limitations in review methods mean some relevant studies could have been missed. Authors' objectives To update the 2002 and 2008 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) evidence reviews on screening and treatments for prostate cancer. Searching MEDLINE and the Cochrane

2012 DARE. PubMed

46. Randomised controlled trial: Prostate cancer screening has no effect on prostate cancer specific mortality over 20 years of follow-up of Swedish men

Randomised controlled trial: Prostate cancer screening has no effect on prostate cancer specific mortality over 20 years of follow-up of Swedish men Prostate cancer screening has no effect on prostate cancer specific mortality over 20 years of follow-up of Swedish men | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please (...) see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Prostate cancer screening has no effect on prostate cancer specific mortality over 20 years of follow-up of Swedish men

2012 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

47. Screening for prostate cancer. (PubMed)

Screening for prostate cancer. 22029754 2011 12 09 2011 11 24 1533-4406 365 21 2011 Nov 24 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Clinical practice. Screening for prostate cancer. 2013-9 10.1056/NEJMcp1103642 Hoffman Richard M RM Department of Medicine, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, and the Medicine Service, New Mexico Veterans Affairs Health Care System, Albuquerque, USA. rhoffman@unm.edu eng Journal Article Review 2011 10 26 United States N Engl J Med 0255562 0028 (...) -4793 EC 3.4.21.77 Prostate-Specific Antigen AIM IM Biopsy Decision Making Humans Male Mass Screening adverse effects Middle Aged Patient Participation Practice Guidelines as Topic Prostate-Specific Antigen blood Prostatic Neoplasms diagnosis epidemiology mortality Risk Factors Sensitivity and Specificity United States epidemiology 2011 10 28 6 0 2011 10 28 6 0 2011 12 14 6 0 ppublish 22029754 10.1056/NEJMcp1103642

2011 NEJM

48. Stratifying risk - the u.s. Preventive services task force and prostate-cancer screening. (PubMed)

Stratifying risk - the u.s. Preventive services task force and prostate-cancer screening. 22029756 2011 12 09 2011 11 24 1533-4406 365 21 2011 Nov 24 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Stratifying risk--the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and prostate-cancer screening. 1953-5 10.1056/NEJMp1112140 Schröder Fritz H FH Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. eng Journal Article 2011 10 26 United States N Engl J Med 0255562 0028-4793 EC 3.4.21.77 (...) Prostate-Specific Antigen AIM IM Advisory Committees Humans Male Mass Screening standards Practice Guidelines as Topic Preventive Health Services standards Prostate-Specific Antigen blood Prostatic Neoplasms blood diagnosis prevention & control Risk Factors United States 2011 10 28 6 0 2011 10 28 6 0 2011 12 14 6 0 ppublish 22029756 10.1056/NEJMp1112140

2011 NEJM

49. Prostate-cancer screening - what the u.s. Preventive services task force left out. (PubMed)

Prostate-cancer screening - what the u.s. Preventive services task force left out. 22029759 2011 12 09 2011 11 24 1533-4406 365 21 2011 Nov 24 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Prostate-cancer screening--what the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force left out. 1949-51 10.1056/NEJMp1112191 Brett Allan S AS Department of Medicine, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, USA. Ablin Richard J RJ eng Journal Article 2011 10 26 United States N Engl J Med 0255562 (...) 0028-4793 EC 3.4.21.77 Prostate-Specific Antigen AIM IM Advisory Committees Direct Service Costs Humans Male Mass Screening economics standards Practice Guidelines as Topic Preventive Health Services standards Prostate-Specific Antigen blood Prostatic Neoplasms blood diagnosis prevention & control United States 2011 10 28 6 0 2011 10 28 6 0 2011 12 14 6 0 ppublish 22029759 10.1056/NEJMp1112191

2011 NEJM

50. Prostate cancer screening

Prostate cancer screening CUAJ • August 2011 • Volume 5, Issue 4 © 2011 Canadian Urological Association 235 CUA gUideline Cite as: Can Urol Assoc J 2011;5(4):235-40; DOI:10.5489/cuaj.11134 Methods and data collection A systematic literature search was conducted in the follow- ing electronic bibliographic databases: MEDLINE, includ- ing PreMedline (2004 to November 2010), EMBASE (2004 to Week 44, 2010) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (2010, 4th Quarter). This search (...) was restricted to studies published in English. The search queries were based on a combination of exploded and non-exploded subject headings and free-text keywords. These terms included prostate cancer, prostatic neoplasms, prostate tumour, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), digital rectal examination (DRE), DRE, mass screening, screening test, early detection of cancer, cancer screening, screening, PSA, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS), TRUS, ran- domized, false-negative and false-positive; we used alterna- tive

2011 CPG Infobase

51. Cost-effectiveness of prostate specific antigen screening in the United States: extrapolating from the European study of screening for prostate cancer

Cost-effectiveness of prostate specific antigen screening in the United States: extrapolating from the European study of screening for prostate cancer Cost-effectiveness of prostate specific antigen screening in the United States: extrapolating from the European study of screening for prostate cancer Cost-effectiveness of prostate specific antigen screening in the United States: extrapolating from the European study of screening for prostate cancer Shteynshlyuger A, Andriole GL Record Status (...) This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. CRD summary This study examined the cost-effectiveness of screening for prostate cancer using prostate-specific antigen, compared with no screening, using the preliminary results of the European Randomized Study of Screening

2011 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

52. PSA Test to Screen for Prostate Cancer

PSA Test to Screen for Prostate Cancer PSA Test to Screen for Prostate Cancer – TheNNTTheNNT Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) Test to Screen for Prostate Cancer 5 for unneeded biopsy In Summary, for those who got the PSA test: Benefits in NNT 100% saw no benefit 0% were helped by preventing death from any cause 0% were helped by preventing death from prostate cancer None were helped (preventing death from any cause, preventing death from prostate cancer) Harms in NNT 20% were harmed (...) with prostate CA in their lifetime and a 3% chance of dying from prostate cancer. Autopsy studies have shown that up to 2/3 of elderly men die with asymptomatic prostate cancer. It appears that if they live long enough most men will develop prostate cancer, though it will not affect their longevity. Given the high incidence of prostate cancer, there have been aggressive efforts to screen patients with the hopes of diagnosing local (non-metastatic) cancer that can be treated before it progresses. Elevated

2011 theNNT

53. Population screening act: prostate cancer screening using MRI

Population screening act: prostate cancer screening using MRI Population screening act: prostate cancer screening using MRI Population screening act: prostate cancer screening using MRI Health Council of the Netherlands Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Health Council of the Netherlands. Population screening act: prostate cancer screening using MRI (...) . The Hague: Health Council of the Netherlands Gezondheidsraad (GR). 2011/37. 2011 Final publication URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Humans; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Mass Screening; Prostatic Neoplasms Language Published English Country of organisation Netherlands English summary An English language summary is available. Address for correspondence Postbus 16052, 2500 BB Den Haag, The Netherlands. Tel: +31 70 340 7520;Fax: +31 70 340 7523 Email: info@gr.nl AccessionNumber

2011 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

54. Randomised prostate cancer screening trial: 20 year follow-up. (Full text)

Randomised prostate cancer screening trial: 20 year follow-up. To assess whether screening for prostate cancer reduces prostate cancer specific mortality.Population based randomised controlled trial.Department of Urology, Norrköping, and the South-East Region Prostate Cancer Register.All men aged 50-69 in the city of Norrköping, Sweden, identified in 1987 in the National Population Register (n = 9026).From the study population, 1494 men were randomly allocated to be screened by including every (...) sixth man from a list of dates of birth. These men were invited to be screened every third year from 1987 to 1996. On the first two occasions screening was done by digital rectal examination only. From 1993, this was combined with prostate specific antigen testing, with 4 µg/L as cut off. On the fourth occasion (1996), only men aged 69 or under at the time of the investigation were invited.Data on tumour stage, grade, and treatment from the South East Region Prostate Cancer Register. Prostate cancer

2011 BMJ PubMed

55. Effect of screening on ovarian cancer mortality: the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Randomized Controlled Trial. (Full text)

Effect of screening on ovarian cancer mortality: the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Randomized Controlled Trial. Screening for ovarian cancer with cancer antigen 125 (CA-125) and transvaginal ultrasound has an unknown effect on mortality.To evaluate the effect of screening for ovarian cancer on mortality in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial.Randomized controlled trial of 78,216 women aged 55 to 74 years assigned to undergo (...) ultrasound but received their usual medical care. Participants were followed up for a maximum of 13 years (median [range], 12.4 years [10.9-13.0 years]) for cancer diagnoses and death until February 28, 2010.Mortality from ovarian cancer, including primary peritoneal and fallopian tube cancers. Secondary outcomes included ovarian cancer incidence and complications associated with screening examinations and diagnostic procedures.Ovarian cancer was diagnosed in 212 women (5.7 per 10,000 person-years

2011 JAMA PubMed

56. Screening by chest radiograph and lung cancer mortality: the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) randomized trial. (Full text)

Screening by chest radiograph and lung cancer mortality: the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) randomized trial. The effect on mortality of screening for lung cancer with modern chest radiographs is unknown.To evaluate the effect on mortality of screening for lung cancer using radiographs in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial.Randomized controlled trial that involved 154,901 participants aged 55 through 74 years, 77,445 of whom were assigned (...) % at years 1 through 3; the rate of screening use in the usual care group was 11%. Cumulative lung cancer incidence rates through 13 years of follow-up were 20.1 per 10,000 person-years in the intervention group and 19.2 per 10,000 person-years in the usual care group (rate ratio [RR]; 1.05, 95% CI, 0.98-1.12). A total of 1213 lung cancer deaths were observed in the intervention group compared with 1230 in usual care group through 13 years (mortality RR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.87-1.22). Stage and histology were

2011 JAMA PubMed

57. Patient-centered discussions about prostate cancer screening: a real-world approach. (Full text)

Patient-centered discussions about prostate cancer screening: a real-world approach. National guidelines recommend that primary care providers discuss the risks and benefits of prostate cancer screening with their patients but give little guidance on how to fit such a complex discussion into a busy clinic encounter. The authors propose a process-oriented approach (Ask-Tell-Ask) that promotes tailored conversations and value-based recommendations. The Ask-Tell-Ask approach includes diagnosing (...) a patient's informational needs, providing targeted education based on those needs, and making a shared decision about testing. This time-efficient model emphasizes the provider's role as an interactive guide rather than a one-way supplier of information. Although there is no way to make these discussions simple, this streamlined strategy can help patients and providers efficiently negotiate the complex and important decision of screening for prostate cancer.

2010 Annals of Internal Medicine PubMed

58. Mortality results from the Goteborg randomised population-based prostate-cancer screening trial (Full text)

Mortality results from the Goteborg randomised population-based prostate-cancer screening trial Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of death from malignant disease among men in the developed world. One strategy to decrease the risk of death from this disease is screening with prostate-specific antigen (PSA); however, the extent of benefit and harm with such screening is under continuous debate.In December, 1994, 20,000 men born between 1930 and 1944, randomly sampled from (...) the population register, were randomised by computer in a 1:1 ratio to either a screening group invited for PSA testing every 2 years (n=10,000) or to a control group not invited (n=10,000). Men in the screening group were invited up to the upper age limit (median 69, range 67-71 years) and only men with raised PSA concentrations were offered additional tests such as digital rectal examination and prostate biopsies. The primary endpoint was prostate-cancer specific mortality, analysed according

2010 EvidenceUpdates PubMed

59. Screening and Early Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer

Screening and Early Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer ©2010 Page Primary Care Guide to Evaluation and Referral for Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Access Project (PROCAP) This Primary Care Guide to Evaluation and Referral for Prostate Cancer was developed by the Prostate Cancer Access Project (PROCAP) † as a clinical and educational resource for primary care practitioners in Alberta. Its aim is to support physicians in identifying and managing patients concerned about, at risk for, or suspicious (...) of having prostate cancer in order to foster appropriate, timely referrals and communication between primary and specialist care. This guide is intended to complement and not supplant the Guideline for the Use of PSA and the Early Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer (1) developed by Toward Optimized Practice. Practice Highlights 1. In Alberta mass (population) screening for prostate cancer is not currently recommended, using any clinical methodologies (DRE or PSA). The Alberta Medical Association’s Toward

2010 Toward Optimized Practice

60. Screening for prostate cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. (Full text)

Screening for prostate cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. To examine the evidence on the benefits and harms of screening for prostate cancer.Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.Electronic databases including Medline, Embase, CENTRAL, abstract proceedings, and reference lists up to July 2010. Review methods Included studies were randomised controlled trials comparing screening by prostate specific antigen with or without (...) was associated with an increased probability of receiving a diagnosis of prostate cancer (relative risk 1.46, 95% confidence interval 1.21 to 1.77; P<0.001) and stage I prostate cancer (1.95, 1.22 to 3.13; P=0.005). There was no significant effect of screening on death from prostate cancer (0.88, 0.71 to 1.09; P=0.25) or overall mortality (0.99, 0.97 to 1.01; P=0.44). All trials had one or more substantial methodological limitations. None provided data on the effects of screening on participants' quality

2010 BMJ PubMed