Latest & greatest articles for pulmonary embolism

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Top results for pulmonary embolism

21. A comparison of the unstructured clinician gestalt, the Wells score, and the revised Geneva score for the estimation of pretest probability in suspected pulmonary embolism

A comparison of the unstructured clinician gestalt, the Wells score, and the revised Geneva score for the estimation of pretest probability in suspected pulmonary embolism Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability

2019 PROSPERO

22. Diagnosis of suspected acute pulmonary embolism in pregnancy: protocol for a systematic review and individual patient data meta-analysis (IPDMA)

Diagnosis of suspected acute pulmonary embolism in pregnancy: protocol for a systematic review and individual patient data meta-analysis (IPDMA) Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content

2019 PROSPERO

23. Pulmonary embolism

Pulmonary embolism Pulmonary embolism - NICE CKS Share Pulmonary embolism: Summary Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a condition in which one or more emboli, usually arising from a blood clot formed in the veins, are lodged in and obstruct the pulmonary arterial system, causing severe respiratory dysfunction. The most common source of pulmonary emboli is deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in the lower limbs. Major risk factors for PE include: DVT. Previous DVT or PE. Active cancer. Recent surgery. Lower limb (...) they should be advised to carry at all times), and verbal and written information on anticoagulation treatment. Ensuring people with unprovoked PE are offered investigations to assess the possibility of an undiagnosed cancer and, where appropriate, hereditary thrombophilia testing. Have I got the right topic? Have I got the right topic? From age 18 years onwards. This CKS topic covers the detection of pulmonary embolism (PE) in primary care and the primary care management of people with suspected

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

24. Efficacy of rivaroxaban for pulmonary embolism (PE): an updated systematic review protocol of randomized controlled trial

Efficacy of rivaroxaban for pulmonary embolism (PE): an updated systematic review protocol of randomized controlled trial Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any

2019 PROSPERO

25. Safety and efficacy of the mid-dose alteplase use in massive and sub-massive pulmonary embolism: systematic review and meta-analysis

Safety and efficacy of the mid-dose alteplase use in massive and sub-massive pulmonary embolism: systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record

2019 PROSPERO

26. Thrombolytic therapy for pulmonary embolism. (PubMed)

Thrombolytic therapy for pulmonary embolism. Thrombolytic therapy is usually reserved for patients with clinically serious or massive pulmonary embolism (PE). Evidence suggests that thrombolytic agents may dissolve blood clots more rapidly than heparin and may reduce the death rate associated with PE. However, there are still concerns about the possible risk of adverse effects of thrombolytic therapy, such as major or minor haemorrhage. This is the third update of the Cochrane review first (...) of treatment. None of the included studies reported on post-thrombotic syndrome or compared the costs of different treatments.Low-quality evidence suggests that thrombolytics reduce death following acute pulmonary embolism compared with heparin. The included studies used a variety of thrombolytic drugs. Thrombolytic therapy may be helpful in reducing the recurrence of pulmonary emboli but may cause major and minor haemorrhagic events and stroke. More high-quality, blinded randomised controlled trials

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2018 Cochrane

27. Increasing Safe Outpatient Management of Emergency Department Patients With Pulmonary Embolism: A Controlled Pragmatic Trial. (PubMed)

Increasing Safe Outpatient Management of Emergency Department Patients With Pulmonary Embolism: A Controlled Pragmatic Trial. Many low-risk patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE) in the emergency department (ED) are eligible for outpatient care but are hospitalized nonetheless. One impediment to home discharge is the difficulty of identifying which patients can safely forgo hospitalization.To evaluate the effect of an integrated electronic clinical decision support system (CDSS

2018 Annals of Internal Medicine

28. Accuracy and Interobserver Reliability of the Simplified Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index Versus the Hestia Criteria for Patients With Pulmonary Embolism

Accuracy and Interobserver Reliability of the Simplified Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index Versus the Hestia Criteria for Patients With Pulmonary Embolism The objective was to assess and compare the accuracy and interobserver reliability of the simplified Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (sPESI) and the Hestia criteria for predicting short-term mortality in patients with pulmonary embolism (PE).This prospective cohort study evaluated consecutive eligible adults with PE diagnosed

2018 EvidenceUpdates

29. Can Echocardiography Be Used to Diagnose Pulmonary Embolism at the Bedside?

Can Echocardiography Be Used to Diagnose Pulmonary Embolism at the Bedside? TAKE-HOME MESSAGE When pretest probability for pulmonary embolism is high, abnormalities in right ventricular function detected on echocardiogram strongly support the diagnosis; however, a normal echocardiogram cannot be used to rule out pulmonary embolism. Can Echocardiography Be Used to Diagnose Pulmonary Embolism at the Bedside? EBEM Commentators Robert R. Ehrman, MD Mark J. Favot, MD Department of Emergency Medicine (...) by cardiologists, and 1 unclear)andatthepointofcarein 7 studies; 7 studies were con- ducted solely in the ED. The authors identi?ed 9 unique echocardiographic signs of pulmo- nary embolism, as well as the unde?ned ?nding of “right-sided heart strain.” Overall, the signs of pulmonary embolism were moder- atelyspeci?c(range61%to99%)but poorly sensitive (range 5% to 80%). Test characteristics were slightly improved when echocardiograms were performed by physicians. In the pooled and subgroup analyses, McConnell’s

2018 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

30. What Is the Best Imaging Study to Rule Out Pulmonary Embolism in Pregnancy? (SRS diagnosis)

What Is the Best Imaging Study to Rule Out Pulmonary Embolism in Pregnancy? (SRS diagnosis) What Is the Best Imaging Study to Rule Out Pulmonary Embolism in Pregnancy? TAKE-HOME MESSAGE Both computed tomography (CT) pulmonary angiography and lung scintigraphy (ie, ventilation-perfusion scan) are appropriate imaging options for exclusion of pulmonary embolism during pregnancy. EBEM Commentators Latha Ganti, MD, MBA David Lebowitz, MD Department of Clinical Sciences University of Central Florida (...) College of Medicine Orlando, FL Jestin N. Carlson, MD, MS, and Alan Jones, MD, serve as editors of the SRS series. Editor’s Note: This is a clinical synopsis, a regular feature of the Annals’ Systematic Review Snapshot (SRS) series. The source for this systematic review snapshot is: van Mens TE, Scheres LJJ, de Jong PG, et al. Imaging for theexclusion of pulmonary embolism in pregnancy. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2017;1:CD011053. Results Summary of results for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism

2018 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

31. Diagnosis of Pulmonary Embolism During Pregnancy: A Multicenter Prospective Management Outcome Study. (PubMed)

Diagnosis of Pulmonary Embolism During Pregnancy: A Multicenter Prospective Management Outcome Study. Data on the optimal diagnostic management of pregnant women with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE) are limited, and guidelines provide inconsistent recommendations on use of diagnostic tests.To prospectively validate a diagnostic strategy in pregnant women with suspected PE.Multicenter, multinational, prospective diagnostic management outcome study involving pretest clinical probability (...) assessment, high-sensitivity D-dimer testing, bilateral lower limb compression ultrasonography (CUS), and computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA). (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00740454).11 centers in France and Switzerland between August 2008 and July 2016.Pregnant women with clinically suspected PE in emergency departments.Pulmonary embolism was excluded in patients with a low or intermediate pretest clinical probability and a negative D-dimer result. All others underwent lower limb CUS

2018 Annals of Internal Medicine

32. BTS Guidelines for the outpatient management of pulmonary embolism

BTS Guidelines for the outpatient management of pulmonary embolism Thorax An international journal of RESPIRATORY MEDICINE thorax.bmj.com July 2018 Volume 73 Supplement 2 BRITISH THORACIC SOCIETY GUIDELINE FOR THE INITIAL OUTPATIENT MANAGEMENT OF PULMONARY EMBOLISM British Thoracic Society Outpatient Management of Pulmonary Embolism Guideline Development GroupHealthcare providers need to use clinical judgement, knowledge and expertise when deciding whether it is appropriate to apply (...) recommendations for the management of patients. The recommendations cited here are a guide and may not be appropriate for use in all situations. The guidance provided does not override the responsibility of healthcare professionals to make decisions appropriate to the circumstances of each patient, in consultation with the patient and/or their guardian or carer.BTS Outpatient Management of Pulmonary Embolism Guideline Development Group Dr Luke Howard (Chair), Dr Steve Barden, Dr Robin Condliffe, Dr Vincent

2018 British Thoracic Society

33. Safety of the Combination of PERC and YEARS Rules in Patients With Low Clinical Probability of Pulmonary Embolism: A Retrospective Analysis of Two Large European Cohorts

Safety of the Combination of PERC and YEARS Rules in Patients With Low Clinical Probability of Pulmonary Embolism: A Retrospective Analysis of Two Large European Cohorts This study aimed to determine the failure rate of a combination of the PERC and the YEARS rules for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) in the emergency department (ED).We performed a retrospective analysis of two European cohorts of emergency patients with low gestalt clinical probability of PE (PROPER and PERCEPIC). All (...) patients we included were managed using a conventional strategy (D-dimer test, followed, if positive, by computed tomographic pulmonary angiogram (CTPA). We tested a diagnostic strategy that combined PERC and YEARS to rule out PE. The primary endpoint was a thromboembolic event diagnosed in the ED or at 3-months follow-up. Secondary endpoints included a thromboembolic event at baseline in the ED and a CTPA in the ED. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals (CIs) of proportions were calculated

2018 EvidenceUpdates

34. Prevalence of pulmonary embolism in syncope

Prevalence of pulmonary embolism in syncope Emergency Medicine > Journal Club > Archive > March 2018 Toggle navigation March 2018 2018 Prevalence of PE in Syncope Vignette You're working a TCC shift with Dr. Cohn, sitting right beside you. He's drinking a Diet Coke, having not offered you one. You decide to go see your next patient, a 78 year old female, complaining of "feeling woozy". she endorses syncope, shortness of breath, and leg pain. She is saturating 89% on room air, tachycardic to 104 (...) , and BP 117/76. She has many other reasons other than a pulmonary embolism to be feeling this way, but the syncope has you thinking. You remember reading an article that was all the rage a few months ago regarding syncope as a presenting complaint for PE. It was fake news, you said. So vague. But here you are. You've got a minute, and Dr. Cohn by your side. You search the literature and gently fall into a rabbit hole... PICO Question Population: Adult patients presenting to the ED with syncope

2018 Washington University Emergency Medicine Journal Club

35. Selecting pregnant or postpartum women with suspected pulmonary embolism for diagnostic imaging: the DiPEP diagnostic study with decision-analysis modelling

Selecting pregnant or postpartum women with suspected pulmonary embolism for diagnostic imaging: the DiPEP diagnostic study with decision-analysis modelling Selecting pregnant or postpartum women with suspected pulmonary embolism for diagnostic imaging: the DiPEP diagnostic study with decision-analysis modelling Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found (...) . Please choose a page from the navigation or try a website search above to find the information you need. >> >> >> >> Issue {{metadata .Issue }} Toolkit 1)"> 0)"> 1)"> {{metadata.Title}} {{metadata.Headline}} Clinical features, decision rules and biomarkers do not accurately select pregnant or postpartum women with suspected pulmonary embolism for diagnostic imaging. {{author}} {{($index , , , , , , , , , & . Steve Goodacre 1, * , Kimberley Horspool 1 , Neil Shephard 1 , Daniel Pollard 1 , Beverley J

2018 NIHR HTA programme

36. Blood and Clots Series: Diagnosing pulmonary embolism in pregnancy

Blood and Clots Series: Diagnosing pulmonary embolism in pregnancy Blood and Clots Series: Diagnosing pulmonary embolism in pregnancy - CanadiEM Blood and Clots Series: Diagnosing pulmonary embolism in pregnancy In , by Eric Tseng August 13, 2018 All the content from the Blood & Clots series can be found . CanMEDS Roles addressed: Medical Expert Case Description A pregnant 32 year old female presents to the ER with chest pain. She is 33 weeks gestational age, and this is her third pregnancy (...) air, and respiratory rate is 22. Her weight is 80 kg. Cardiac and respiratory examinations are unremarkable. She has no leg swelling or erythema. Her abdomen demonstrates a gravid uterus. Her bloodwork demonstrates a Hb of 98, WBC 5.0, platelets 156, creatinine 80. D-Dimer is 1,080. Her chest x-ray is unremarkable, with no effusions or consolidation. Does she have a pulmonary embolism (PE)? Main Text Question 1: How helpful are clinical prediction rules and D-Dimer for ruling in or ruling out

2018 CandiEM

37. Pulmonary embolism

Pulmonary embolism Top results for pulmonary embolism - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Liberating the literature ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button. An example search might look like (#1 (...) or #2) and (#3 or #4) Loading history... Population: Intervention: Comparison: Outcome: Population: Intervention: Latest & greatest articles for pulmonary embolism The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

38. Evaluation of the pulmonary embolism rule out criteria (PERC rule) in children evaluated for suspected pulmonary embolism

Evaluation of the pulmonary embolism rule out criteria (PERC rule) in children evaluated for suspected pulmonary embolism The pulmonary embolism rule out criteria (PERC) reliably predicts a low probability of PE in adults. We examine the diagnostic accuracy of the objective components of the PERC rule in children previously tested for PE.Children aged 5-17 who had a D-dimer or pulmonary vascular imaging ordered from 2004 to 2014 in a large multicenter hospital network were identified by query

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2018 EvidenceUpdates

39. Prediction of short-term prognosis in elderly patients with acute pulmonary embolism: validation of the RIETE score

Prediction of short-term prognosis in elderly patients with acute pulmonary embolism: validation of the RIETE score Essentials The RIETE score was derived to predict 10-day adverse outcomes in acute pulmonary embolism (PE). We externally validated the RIETE score in a prospective cohort of patients with PE. The RIETE score classified fewer patients as low-risk than currently recommended scores. The RIETE score was not superior to other scores in predicting 10-day adverse outcomes.Introduction (...) The Registro Informatizado de la Enfermedad TromboEmbolica (RIETE) score was derived to identify patients with pulmonary embolism (PE) at low risk of overall complications. Objective To externally validate the RIETE score and compare its prognostic performance with the Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (PESI), its simplified version (sPESI) and the Geneva Prognostic Score (GPS). Methods In a prospective multicenter cohort, we studied 687 elderly patients with acute PE. The primary outcome was 10-day

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2018 EvidenceUpdates

40. Percutaneous extraction of an embolized progesterone contraceptive implant from the pulmonary artery (PubMed)

Percutaneous extraction of an embolized progesterone contraceptive implant from the pulmonary artery The Nexplanon® implant is a commonly used radiopaque contraceptive device that contains progestogen associated with an ethylene vinyl-acetate copolymer resulting in a slow release of the active hormonal ingredient. It is inserted into the subdermal connective tissue and provides contraceptive efficacy for up to 3 years. Device removal for clinical, personal or device "end-of-life span" reasons (...) is straightforward. In rare cases, implant migration can occur locally within centimeters of the insertion site. Distant device embolization is extremely rare and can result in complications including chest pain, dyspnoea, pneumothorax and thrombosis or prevent conception until the active ingredient is depleted. We present one such case, where a Nexplanon® implant embolized into the pulmonary artery of a young female patient. We describe the initial "missed" diagnosis of embolized device on a chest radiograph

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2018 Open access journal of contraception