Latest & greatest articles for rheumatoid arthritis

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Top results for rheumatoid arthritis

961. Low-dose cyclosporin versus placebo in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. (PubMed)

Low-dose cyclosporin versus placebo in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. 144 patients with severe rheumatoid arthritis from six centres were randomised to receive oral cyclosporin or placebo for 6 months. The initial daily dose of cyclosporin was 2.5 mg/kg, which was increased cautiously with monitoring of serum cyclosporin levels and creatinine; the mean stabilisation dose was 3.8 mg/kg. There were significant improvements in the cyclosporin-treated patients compared with the controls

1990 Lancet

962. Double blind placebo controlled trial of pulse treatment with methylprednisolone combined with disease modifying drugs in rheumatoid arthritis. (PubMed)

Double blind placebo controlled trial of pulse treatment with methylprednisolone combined with disease modifying drugs in rheumatoid arthritis. To assess whether monthly treatment with intravenous methylprednisolone enhances or accelerates the effect of disease modifying drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.A 12 month double blind, placebo controlled, multicentre trial in which patients with active rheumatoid arthritis were randomly allocated to receive pulses of either (...) methylprednisolone or saline every four weeks for six months. At the start of the pulse treatment all patients were started on penicillamine or azathioprine.Four rheumatology departments in Denmark.97 Patients (71 women, 26 men) aged 23-84 (mean 60) who had active rheumatoid arthritis of at least four weeks' duration despite treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.Monthly clinical recording of morning stiffness, number of tender and swollen joints, blinded observers' evaluation of therapeutic effect

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1990 BMJ

963. Effects of hydroxychloroquine and sulphasalazine on progression of joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis. (PubMed)

Effects of hydroxychloroquine and sulphasalazine on progression of joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis. The effects of hydroxychloroquine and sulphasalazine on progression of joint damage shown by X-rays were compared in a double-blind, randomised trial in 60 patients with rheumatoid arthritis not previously treated with slow-acting antirheumatic drugs. X-rays of the hands and feet at the start and after 24 and 48 weeks of treatment were available for 28 patients treated

1989 Lancet

964. Fish oils in rheumatoid arthritis. (PubMed)

Fish oils in rheumatoid arthritis. 3369779 1988 06 15 2004 11 17 0003-4819 108 6 1988 Jun Annals of internal medicine Ann. Intern. Med. Fish oils in rheumatoid arthritis. 904-5 Singh G G Chandra R K RK eng Clinical Trial Letter Randomized Controlled Trial United States Ann Intern Med 0372351 0003-4819 0 Fish Oils AIM IM Arthritis, Rheumatoid drug therapy Fish Oils therapeutic use Humans Research Design 1988 6 1 1988 6 1 0 1 1988 6 1 0 0 ppublish 3369779

1988 Annals of Internal Medicine

965. Penicillamine and hydroxychloroquine in the treatment of severe juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Results of the U.S.A.-U.S.S.R. double-blind placebo-controlled trial. (PubMed)

Penicillamine and hydroxychloroquine in the treatment of severe juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Results of the U.S.A.-U.S.S.R. double-blind placebo-controlled trial. One hundred sixty-two children with severe juvenile rheumatoid arthritis were entered in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled 12-month clinical trial designed to establish the efficacy and safety of two slower-acting antirheumatic drugs, penicillamine and hydroxychloroquine. The study was a cooperative effort of the United (...) . There were no significant differences in efficacy between the penicillamine and placebo groups. Pain on movement was the only index of articular disease that was alleviated more by hydroxychloroquine than by placebo. Serious adverse drug reactions attributable to the active agents were rare. We were unable to demonstrate that, in the presence of a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, either penicillamine or hydroxychloroquine is superior to placebo in the treatment of children with juvenile rheumatoid

1986 NEJM

966. Placebo-controlled, blind study of dietary manipulation therapy in rheumatoid arthritis. (PubMed)

Placebo-controlled, blind study of dietary manipulation therapy in rheumatoid arthritis. In a blind, placebo-controlled study of dietary manipulation therapy in outpatients with rheumatoid arthritis there was significant objective improvement during periods of dietary therapy compared with periods of placebo treatment, particularly among "good responders". Possible explanations for improvement include reduced food intolerance, reduced gastrointestinal permeability, and benefit from weight loss

1986 Lancet

967. Effects of manipulation of dietary fatty acids on clinical manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis. (PubMed)

Effects of manipulation of dietary fatty acids on clinical manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis. The effects of manipulation of dietary fatty acids in patients with rheumatoid arthritis were investigated in a 12-week, prospective, double-blind, controlled study. 17 patients took an experimental diet high in polyunsaturated fat and low in saturated fat, with a daily supplement (1.8 g) of eicosapentaenoic acid. 20 patients took a control diet with a lower polyunsaturated to saturated fat ratio

1985 Lancet

968. Treatment of active rheumatoid arthritis with slow intravenous injections of thymopentin. A double-blind placebo-controlled randomised study. (PubMed)

Treatment of active rheumatoid arthritis with slow intravenous injections of thymopentin. A double-blind placebo-controlled randomised study. 41 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis entered a placebo-controlled double-blind randomised study in which 21 received slow intravenous injections (given in fractions over 10 min) of thymopentin (TP-5) 50 mg 3 times a week for 3 consecutive weeks and 20 received placebo in the same way. After 3 weeks of treatment the TP-5 group showed improvement (p

1985 Lancet

969. Efficacy of low-dose methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis. (PubMed)

Efficacy of low-dose methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis. Twenty-eight patients with refractory rheumatoid arthritis completed a randomized 24-week double-blind crossover trial comparing oral methotrexate (2.5 to 5 mg every 12 hours for three doses weekly) with placebo. The methotrexate group had significant reductions (P less than 0.01 as compared with the placebo group) in the number of tender or painful joints, the duration of morning stiffness, and disease activity according to physician (...) response to methotrexate. Adverse reactions during methotrexate therapy included transaminase elevation (21 per cent), nausea (18 per cent), and diarrhea (12 per cent); one patient was withdrawn from the trial because of diarrhea. One patient died while receiving the placebo. Methotrexate did not affect measures of humoral or cellular immunity. We conclude that this trial provides evidence of the short-term efficacy of methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis, but the mechanism of action is unknown. Longer

1985 NEJM

970. Long-term study of management of rheumatoid arthritis. (PubMed)

Long-term study of management of rheumatoid arthritis. A 10-year study of the management of rheumatoid arthritis was conducted to compare a programme consisting of rest and anti-inflammatory and antirheumatic drugs with one consisting of maintenance of activity, anti-inflammatory and antirheumatic drugs, and systemic steroids where necessary. During this period subjects who did not respond to the treatment allocated went on to a combined treatment programme of rest, anti-inflammatory

1984 Lancet

971. Plasmapheresis therapy in rheumatoid arthritis. A controlled, double-blind, crossover trial. (PubMed)

Plasmapheresis therapy in rheumatoid arthritis. A controlled, double-blind, crossover trial. Twenty-six patients with rheumatoid arthritis (average age, 57 years; average duration of disease, 11 years) who were unresponsive to antiinflammatory and slow-acting antirheumatic drug therapy were entered into a controlled, double-blind, crossover study to assess the efficacy of plasmapheresis therapy. All patients received 10 true and 10 sham aphereses as outpatients and continued to take their usual (...) in the erythrocyte-sedimentation rate, rheumatoid factor titer, and levels of hemoglobin, IgM, and C3 occurred only with true therapy (P = 0.001, 0.01, 0.03, 0.045, and 0.005, respectively). We conclude that plasmapheresis does not have clinical benefit in chronic rheumatoid arthritis, in spite of impressive laboratory changes.

1983 NEJM

972. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents in rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. (PubMed)

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents in rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. The relative effectiveness of six nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents was studied in 33 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 32 patients with ankylosing spondylitis in a double-blind, randomized, prospective study employing a six-way multiple crossover design with six-week trials of each agent. In ankylosing spondylitis, naproxen, indomethacin, and fenoprofen calcium were the most effective agents (...) . In rheumatoid arthritis, relatively little mean difference between drugs was found. Most of this difference could be attributed to compliance factors, which favored drugs that required only a small number of pills daily. Despite the small differences in effect, patients had strong preferences. More than 85% of patients were still taking their preferred medication after a mean follow-up period of one year.

1981 JAMA

973. Intrasynovial orgotein therapy in rheumatoid arthritis. (PubMed)

Intrasynovial orgotein therapy in rheumatoid arthritis. 30 patients with active classical rheumatoid arthritis affecting the knee took part in a 12-week double-blind trial in which intra-articular injections of orgotein (4 mg/week for 6 weeks) were compared with intra-articular aspirin 4 mg/week for 6 weeks. After 12 weeks clinical and biochemical assessments showed that orgotein was superior to aspirin. Clinical response was measured in terms of the cumulative rheumatoid activity index (RAI (...) ) which was based on scores for morning stiffness, range of flexion, pain and 25-foot (7.5 m) walking time. Treatment with orgotein resulted in significant improvement of the RAI; the improvement correlated with findings on knee-joint scanning which showed reduced mean uptake of 99mTc-pyrophosphate. After intra-articular orgotein injections, synovial fluid IgM and IgG rheumatoid factor levels fell significantly; so did prostaglandin E2 formation and lactate dehydrogenase activity. The changes

1981 Lancet

974. Clinical trials of intra-articular aspirin in rheumatoid arthritis. (PubMed)

Clinical trials of intra-articular aspirin in rheumatoid arthritis. The effect of the intra-articular injection of acetylsalicylic acid in patients with rheumatoid arthritis was compared with that of hydrocortisone acetate and with that of saline in blind, controlled, clinical trials. All three preparations were effective in relieving pain and improving the range of motion, and no significant differences were demonstrated. The results suggest a need for the re-appraisal of the value of intra

1980 Lancet

975. Levamisole in rheumatoid arthritis. A randomised double-blind study comparing two dosage regimens of levamisole with placebo. Multicentre study group. (PubMed)

Levamisole in rheumatoid arthritis. A randomised double-blind study comparing two dosage regimens of levamisole with placebo. Multicentre study group. The therapeutic effect of levamisole in patients with rheumatoid arthritis was evaluated in a sixteen-centre double-blind controlled study which compared continuous and intermittent levamisole treatment with placebo for six months. 363 patients with classic or definite rheumatoid arthritis and active disease were evaluated. Continuous (...) and intermittent levamisole treatments were equally effective in controlling disease activity. 20% of patients had important drug-related adverse reactions. The results demonstrated that levamisole is an active drug in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

1978 Lancet

976. Gastrointestinal blood loss. Effect of aspirin, fenoprofen, and acetaminophen in rheumatoid arthritis as determined by sequential gastroscopy and radioactive fecal markers. (PubMed)

Gastrointestinal blood loss. Effect of aspirin, fenoprofen, and acetaminophen in rheumatoid arthritis as determined by sequential gastroscopy and radioactive fecal markers. The feasibility of determining the exact site and amount of drug-induced gastric bleeding was tested. Fourteen patients with rheumatoid arthritis received equivalent therapeutic doses of the antinflammatory drugs aspirin, 4 gm/day, and fenoprofen calcium, 2.4 gm/day, in randomized order for seven days. Acetaminophen

1977 JAMA

977. Oral zinc sulphate in rheumatoid arthritis. (PubMed)

Oral zinc sulphate in rheumatoid arthritis. A preliminary trial of oral zinc supplementation was conducted in twenty-four patients with chronic, refractory rheumatoid arthritis. Zinc sulphate (220 mg three times daily) or placebo capsules of identical appearance were added to pre-existing therapy for 12 wk. This double-blind trial was followed by an open 12-wk period when all subjects took zinc. During the double-blind phase, zinc-treated patients fared better than controls with regard to joint (...) swelling, morning stiffness, walking time, and the patient's own impression of overall disease activity. The indices and joint tenderness also improved with zinc treatment in both groups of subjects during the second 12-wk period. These encouraging results indicate that oral zinc sulphate deserves futher study in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis.

1976 Lancet

978. Ibuprofen or aspirin in rheumatoid arthritis therapy. (PubMed)

Ibuprofen or aspirin in rheumatoid arthritis therapy. Ibuprofen is a nonsteroidal drug with analgesic, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory properties that was recently introduced for use in antiarthritis therapy in the United States. In a year-long double-blind multiclinic trial in 885 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, ibuprofen was at least as satisfactory as aspirin, considering both efficacy and tolerance. In the majority of patients, daily doses ranged from 800 to 1,600 mg of ibuprofen (...) and 3 to 6 gm of aspirin. The drugs did not differ greatly in providing relief from arthritis symptoms, but ibuprofen was definitely better tolerated, especially in regard to gastrointestinal complaints. Seven percent of the ibuprofen group dropped out of the study because of adverse reactions, as compared with 16% of the aspirin group; 17% of the ibuprofen group and 31% of the aspirin group had gastrointestinal symptoms.

1975 JAMA

979. Comprehensive outpatient care in rheumatoid arthritis. A controlled study. (PubMed)

Comprehensive outpatient care in rheumatoid arthritis. A controlled study. 4971442 1968 11 25 2016 10 17 0098-7484 206 6 1968 Nov 04 JAMA JAMA Comprehensive outpatient care in rheumatoid arthritis. A controlled study. 1249-54 Katz S S Vignos P J PJ Jr Moskowitz R W RW Thompson H M HM Svec K H KH eng Clinical Trial Journal Article Randomized Controlled Trial United States JAMA 7501160 0098-7484 0 Salicylates AIM IM Adult Aged Ambulatory Care Arthritis, Rheumatoid drug therapy nursing

1968 JAMA