Latest & greatest articles for side effects

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Top results for side effects

121. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the treatment of elderly depressed patients: a qualitative analysis of the literature on their efficacy and side-effects

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the treatment of elderly depressed patients: a qualitative analysis of the literature on their efficacy and side-effects Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the treatment of elderly depressed patients: a qualitative analysis of the literature on their efficacy and side-effects Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the treatment of elderly depressed patients: a qualitative analysis of the literature on their efficacy (...) and side-effects Menting J E, Honig A, Verhey F R, Hartmans M, Rozendaal N, de Vet H C, van Praag H M Authors' objectives To assess the efficacy and side-effects of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for the treatment of elderly people with depression. Searching MEDLINE was searched from January 1980 until December 1994 using the keywords 'fluvoxamine', 'paroxetine', 'fluoxetine' and 'sertraline' combined with 'aged', 'elderly' or 'geriatric'. The citations in all of the identified papers

1996 DARE.

122. Low-dose neuroleptic therapy and extrapyramidal side effects in schizophrenia: an effect size analysis

Low-dose neuroleptic therapy and extrapyramidal side effects in schizophrenia: an effect size analysis Low-dose neuroleptic therapy and extrapyramidal side effects in schizophrenia: an effect size analysis Low-dose neuroleptic therapy and extrapyramidal side effects in schizophrenia: an effect size analysis Barbui C, Saraceno B Authors' objectives To quantify the overall extrapyramidal side-effect improvement in patients treated with low doses of neuroleptics, compared with those receiving (...) doses varied between 10, 20 and 50% of the standard dose. Participants included in the review Patients with a standardised diagnosis of schizophrenia (RDC, American Psychiatric Association DSM III) and/or schizoaffective disorder (details taken from the meta-analysis of effectiveness by the same authors, see Other Publications of Related Interest). The mean age of the patients was 34 years with a mean history of disease of over 131 months. Outcomes assessed in the review Extrapyramidal side-effects

1996 DARE.

123. Meta-analysis of antidepressant prescribing. Acceptability of side effects as reason for stopping may bias results. (Full text)

Meta-analysis of antidepressant prescribing. Acceptability of side effects as reason for stopping may bias results. 7549710 1995 10 25 2018 11 13 0959-8138 311 7007 1995 Sep 16 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ Meta-analysis of antidepressant prescribing. Acceptability of side effects as reason for stopping may bias results. 751 Ramchandani P P Webb V V eng Letter Comment England BMJ 8900488 0959-8138 0 Antidepressive Agents, Tricyclic 0 Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors AIM IM BMJ. 1995 Jun 3;310(6992 (...) ):1433-8 7613276 Antidepressive Agents, Tricyclic adverse effects Bias Humans Patient Dropouts Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors adverse effects 1995 9 16 1995 9 16 0 1 1995 9 16 0 0 ppublish 7549710 PMC2550746 BMJ. 1993 Mar 13;306(6879):683-7 8471919 BMJ. 1995 Jun 3;310(6992):1433-8 7613276 Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 1994 Spring;9(1):47-53 8195583

1995 BMJ PubMed

124. Avoiding unsuspected respiratory side-effects of topical timolol with cardioselective or sympathomimetic agents. (PubMed)

Avoiding unsuspected respiratory side-effects of topical timolol with cardioselective or sympathomimetic agents. Topical timolol given for the treatment or chronic simple glaucoma may cause unrecognised bronchospasm among elderly people. We recruited 80 patients aged over 60 years, who were without a history of airways disease and already used timolol, into a randomised crossover study comparing the effects on spirometry and exercise tolerance of changing to betaxolol or dipivefrine therapy

1995 Lancet

125. Cognitive side-effects of chronic antiepileptic drug treatment: a review of 25 years of research

Cognitive side-effects of chronic antiepileptic drug treatment: a review of 25 years of research Cognitive side-effects of chronic antiepileptic drug treatment: a review of 25 years of research Cognitive side-effects of chronic antiepileptic drug treatment: a review of 25 years of research Vermeulen J, Aldenkamp A P Authors' objectives To assess the cognitive side effects of long-term anti-epileptic drug treatments. Searching Computerised and manual searches of English language literature (...) types were examined and reported separately: healthy volunteer studies, monotherapy studies, polytherapy studies, studies with a non-randomised post-test only design, studies providing insufficient information. No tests for heterogeneity were used, methodological and statistical issues were discussed. Results of the review Ninety-four articles representing 89 non-overlapping studies were included. The total patient numbers were not given. No clear results were shown on the cognitive side-effects

1995 DARE.

126. Side effects of glucocorticoid treatment. Experience of the Optic Neuritis Treatment Trial. (PubMed)

Side effects of glucocorticoid treatment. Experience of the Optic Neuritis Treatment Trial. To determine the incidence of side effects from short-term glucocorticoid therapy prescribed for treatment of optic neuritis in the Optic Neuritis Treatment Trial.Randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial.Fifteen university- or hospital-based centers throughout the United States.A total of 457 patients between the ages of 18 and 46 years with acute demyelinative optic neuritis were (...) studied.(1) Intravenous methylprednisolone (250 mg every 6 hours) for 3 days while hospitalized followed by oral prednisone (1 mg/kg per day) for 11 days; (2) oral prednisone (1 mg/kg per day) for 14 days; and (3) oral placebo for 14 days. Each regimen was followed by a short taper.Only two patients experienced major side effects, psychotic depression in one and acute pancreatitis in the other. Both of these patients were from the intravenous methylprednisolone group and both of the side effects

1993 JAMA

127. Trial of high-dose Edmonston-Zagreb measles vaccine in the Gambia: antibody response and side-effects. (PubMed)

Trial of high-dose Edmonston-Zagreb measles vaccine in the Gambia: antibody response and side-effects. In a randomised trial, infants living in a large village in The Gambia were immunised either at 4 months of age with 40,000 plaque forming units (PFU) of the Edmonston-Zagreb (EZ) measles vaccine or at the usual age of 9 months with 6000 TCID50 of a conventional Schwarz measles vaccine. Measles developed in 2 of 119 children who received the EZ vaccine, in 1 before and in the other after 9 (...) -term morbidity as assessed by clinic attendances and weight at 18 months of age was much the same in the two groups. The EZ measles vaccine is thus safe and clinically and serologically effective when used in a high dose to immunise young Gambian infants.

1988 Lancet

128. Efficacy and reduced metabolic side effects of a 15-mg chlorthalidone formulation in the treatment of mild hypertension. A multicenter study. (PubMed)

Efficacy and reduced metabolic side effects of a 15-mg chlorthalidone formulation in the treatment of mild hypertension. A multicenter study. We compared a new low-dose chlorthalidone formulation consisting of 15 mg of this compound and a biocompatible polymer in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial with the standard 25-mg dose of chlorthalidone in the management of mild essential hypertension. Two hundred twenty-two patients, ranging in age from 21 to 69 years, with an average standing (...) diastolic blood pressure between 91 and 104 mm Hg participated in this trial. At the end of 12 weeks, the percentage of patients who had a decrease in their standing diastolic blood pressure of 5 mm Hg or more was statistically similar in both of the active-treatment groups and significantly different from the placebo group. With the lower-dose compound, the metabolic side effect of hypokalemia was less of a problem and there was no evidence of glucose intolerance. Thus, this new 15-mg formulation

1987 JAMA

129. beta-blockers or diuretics in hypertension? A six year follow-up of blood pressure and metabolic side effects. (PubMed)

beta-blockers or diuretics in hypertension? A six year follow-up of blood pressure and metabolic side effects. The antihypertensive effect and metabolic side effects of bendroflumethiazide have been compared with those of propranolol in two randomly selected groups, of 53 previously untreated middle-aged men during 6 years' treatment for mild to moderately severe essential hypertension. The blood pressure-reduction was the same in the two groups. During the follow-up 1 man (...) that the frequency of metabolic side effects during diuretic treatment of mild to moderately severe essential hypertension is low and has been grossly exaggerated. Since the antihypertensive effect and side effects were equal with both drugs, and since the diuretics are cheaper, they should be the drug of first choice in this type of hypertension.

1981 Lancet