Latest & greatest articles for traumatic brain injury

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Top results for traumatic brain injury

101. A Clinical Trial of Progesterone for Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

A Clinical Trial of Progesterone for Severe Traumatic Brain Injury PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

2015 PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club

102. Prediction rule: Physician practice and PECARN rule outperform CATCH and CHALICE rules based on the detection of traumatic brain injury as defined by PECARN (Full text)

Prediction rule: Physician practice and PECARN rule outperform CATCH and CHALICE rules based on the detection of traumatic brain injury as defined by PECARN Physician practice and PECARN rule outperform CATCH and CHALICE rules based on the detection of traumatic brain injury as defined by PECARN | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more (...) on the detection of traumatic brain injury as defined by PECARN Article Text Diagnosis Prediction rule Physician practice and PECARN rule outperform CATCH and CHALICE rules based on the detection of traumatic brain injury as defined by PECARN Free Franz E Babl , , , Silvia Bressan , Statistics from Altmetric.com Commentary on : Easter JS , Bakes K , Dhaliwal J , et al . Comparison of PECARN, CATCH, and CHALICE rules for children with minor head injury: a prospective cohort study . Context The recognition

2015 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration) PubMed

103. Standing with electrical stimulation and splinting is no better than standing alone for management of ankle plantarflexion contractures in people with traumatic brain injury: a randomised trial (Full text)

Standing with electrical stimulation and splinting is no better than standing alone for management of ankle plantarflexion contractures in people with traumatic brain injury: a randomised trial Is a combination of standing, electrical stimulation and splinting more effective than standing alone for the management of ankle contractures after severe brain injury?A multi-centre randomised trial with concealed allocation, assessor blinding and intention-to-treat analysis.Thirty-six adults (...) with severe traumatic brain injury and ankle plantarflexion contractures.All participants underwent a 6-week program. The experimental group received tilt table standing, electrical stimulation and ankle splinting. The control group received tilt table standing alone.The primary outcome was passive ankle dorsiflexion with a 12Nm torque. Secondary outcomes included: passive dorsiflexion with lower torques (3, 5, 7 and 9Nm); spasticity; the walking item of the Functional Independence Measure; walking speed

2015 EvidenceUpdates PubMed

104. Management of Traumatic Brain Injury

Management of Traumatic Brain Injury ACS TQIP BEST PRACTICES IN THE MANAGEMENT OF TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURYTable of Contents Introduction 3 Using the Glasgow Coma Scale 3 Triage and Transport 5 Goals of Treatment 5 Intracranial Pressure Monitoring 6 Management of Intracranial Hypertension 9 Advanced Neuromonitoring 12 Surgical Management 13 Nutritional Support 14 Tracheostomy 15 Timing of Secondary Procedures 15 Timing of Pharmacologic Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis 17 Management (...) Considerations for Pediatric Patients with TBI 18 Management Considerations for Elderly Patients with TBI 19 Prognostic Decision-Making and Withdrawal of Medical Support 20 Outcome Assessment and Quality Improvement in TBI 22 Bibliography 24 Expert Panel 28 Acknowledgements 29 Disclaimer 29 2INTRODUCTION Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a disease process that carries major public health and socioeconomic consequences. In the United States alone, an estimated 2.5 million emergency department visits

2015 American College of Surgeons

105. Very early administration of progesterone for acute traumatic brain injury. (Full text)

Very early administration of progesterone for acute traumatic brain injury. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Progesterone has been shown to improve neurologic outcome in multiple experimental models and two early-phase trials involving patients with TBI.We conducted a double-blind, multicenter clinical trial in which patients with severe, moderate-to-severe, or moderate acute TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale score of 4 to 12, on a scale from 3 to 15 (...) , with lower scores indicating a lower level of consciousness) were randomly assigned to intravenous progesterone or placebo, with the study treatment initiated within 4 hours after injury and administered for a total of 96 hours. Efficacy was defined as an increase of 10 percentage points in the proportion of patients with a favorable outcome, as determined with the use of the stratified dichotomy of the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale score at 6 months after injury. Secondary outcomes included mortality

2014 NEJM PubMed

106. A clinical trial of progesterone for severe traumatic brain injury. (Full text)

A clinical trial of progesterone for severe traumatic brain injury. Progesterone has been associated with robust positive effects in animal models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and with clinical benefits in two phase 2 randomized, controlled trials. We investigated the efficacy and safety of progesterone in a large, prospective, phase 3 randomized clinical trial.We conducted a multinational placebo-controlled trial, in which 1195 patients, 16 to 70 years of age, with severe TBI (Glasgow Coma (...) Scale score, ≤8 [on a scale of 3 to 15, with lower scores indicating a reduced level of consciousness] and at least one reactive pupil) were randomly assigned to receive progesterone or placebo. Dosing began within 8 hours after injury and continued for 120 hours. The primary efficacy end point was the Glasgow Outcome Scale score at 6 months after the injury.Proportional-odds analysis with covariate adjustment showed no treatment effect of progesterone as compared with placebo (odds ratio, 0.96

2014 NEJM PubMed

107. Very early administration of progesterone for acute traumatic brain injury. (Full text)

Very early administration of progesterone for acute traumatic brain injury. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Progesterone has been shown to improve neurologic outcome in multiple experimental models and two early-phase trials involving patients with TBI.We conducted a double-blind, multicenter clinical trial in which patients with severe, moderate-to-severe, or moderate acute TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale score of 4 to 12, on a scale from 3 to 15 (...) , with lower scores indicating a lower level of consciousness) were randomly assigned to intravenous progesterone or placebo, with the study treatment initiated within 4 hours after injury and administered for a total of 96 hours. Efficacy was defined as an increase of 10 percentage points in the proportion of patients with a favorable outcome, as determined with the use of the stratified dichotomy of the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale score at 6 months after injury. Secondary outcomes included mortality

2014 NEJM PubMed

108. A clinical trial of progesterone for severe traumatic brain injury. (Full text)

A clinical trial of progesterone for severe traumatic brain injury. Progesterone has been associated with robust positive effects in animal models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and with clinical benefits in two phase 2 randomized, controlled trials. We investigated the efficacy and safety of progesterone in a large, prospective, phase 3 randomized clinical trial.We conducted a multinational placebo-controlled trial, in which 1195 patients, 16 to 70 years of age, with severe TBI (Glasgow Coma (...) Scale score, ≤8 [on a scale of 3 to 15, with lower scores indicating a reduced level of consciousness] and at least one reactive pupil) were randomly assigned to receive progesterone or placebo. Dosing began within 8 hours after injury and continued for 120 hours. The primary efficacy end point was the Glasgow Outcome Scale score at 6 months after the injury.Proportional-odds analysis with covariate adjustment showed no treatment effect of progesterone as compared with placebo (odds ratio, 0.96

2014 NEJM PubMed

109. Progesterone for Traumatic Brain Injury - Resisting the Sirens' Song. (PubMed)

Progesterone for Traumatic Brain Injury - Resisting the Sirens' Song. 25493975 2015 01 09 2018 12 02 1533-4406 371 26 2014 Dec 25 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Progesterone for traumatic brain injury--resisting the sirens' song. 2522-3 10.1056/NEJMe1412951 Schwamm Lee H LH From the Department of Neurology, TeleStroke and Acute Stroke Services, and Institute for Heart, Vascular, and Stroke Care, Massachusetts General Hospital, and the Department of Neurology, Harvard (...) Medical School - both in Boston. eng Editorial Comment 2014 12 10 United States N Engl J Med 0255562 0028-4793 4G7DS2Q64Y Progesterone AIM IM N Engl J Med. 2014 Dec 25;371(26):2467-76 25493978 N Engl J Med. 2014 Dec 25;371(26):2457-66 25493974 Brain Injuries drug therapy Female Humans Male Progesterone administration & dosage 2014 12 11 6 0 2014 12 11 6 0 2015 1 13 6 0 ppublish 25493975 10.1056/NEJMe1412951

2014 NEJM

110. Screening Tools to Identify Adults with Cognitive Impairment Associated with a Cerebrovascular Accident or Traumatic Brain Injury

Screening Tools to Identify Adults with Cognitive Impairment Associated with a Cerebrovascular Accident or Traumatic Brain Injury TITLE: Screening Tools to Identify Adults with Cognitive Impairment Associated with a Cerebrovascular Accident or Traumatic Brain Injury: Diagnostic Accuracy DATE: 13 November 2014 RESEARCH QUESTION What is the diagnostic accuracy of screening tools to identify adults with cognitive impairment associated with a cerebrovascular accident (CVA) or traumatic brain injury (...) (TBI)? KEY FINDINGS One systematic review and 30 non-randomized studies were identified regarding diagnostic accuracy of screening tools to identify adults with cognitive impairment associated with cerebrovascular accident or traumatic brain injury. METHODS A limited literature search was conducted on key resources including PubMed, The Cochrane Library (2014, Issue 10), University of York Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (CRD) databases, Canadian and major international health technology

2014 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

111. Modest cooling therapies (35ºC to 37.5ºC) for traumatic brain injury. (Full text)

Modest cooling therapies (35ºC to 37.5ºC) for traumatic brain injury. Animal models of traumatic brain injury suggest that induced normothermia (36.5 or 37 ºC), compared to induced hyperthermia (39 ºC), improves histopathological and neurobehavioural outcomes. Observational clinical studies of patients with TBI suggest an association between raised body temperature and unfavourable outcome, although this relationship is inconsistent.To assess the effects of modest cooling therapies (defined (...) as any drug or physical therapy aimed at maintaining body temperature between 35 ºC and 37.5 ºC) when applied to patients in the first week after traumatic brain injury.The most recent search was run on 23(rd) September 2013. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group's Specialised Register, The Cochrane Library (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (OvidSP), Embase (OvidSP), ISI WOS: SCI-EXPANDED (1970) & CPCI-S (1990), PubMed and trials registries together with reference checking.All completed randomised, controlled

2014 Cochrane PubMed

112. Health-related quality of life 3 years after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury: a prospective cohort study (PubMed)

Health-related quality of life 3 years after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury: a prospective cohort study To evaluate the time course of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and to identify its predictors.Prospective cohort study with follow-up measurements at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months after TBI.Patients with moderate to severe TBI discharged from 3 level-1 trauma centers.Patients (N=97, 72% men) with a mean age ± SD of 32.8

2014 EvidenceUpdates

113. Screening tools to identify adults with cognitive impairment associated with a cerebrovascular accident or traumatic brain injury: diagnostic accuracy

Screening tools to identify adults with cognitive impairment associated with a cerebrovascular accident or traumatic brain injury: diagnostic accuracy Screening tools to identify adults with cognitive impairment associated with a cerebrovascular accident or traumatic brain injury: diagnostic accuracy Screening tools to identify adults with cognitive impairment associated with a cerebrovascular accident or traumatic brain injury: diagnostic accuracy CADTH Record Status This is a bibliographic (...) record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation CADTH. Screening tools to identify adults with cognitive impairment associated with a cerebrovascular accident or traumatic brain injury: diagnostic accuracy. Ottawa: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). Rapid Response: summary of abstracts. 2014 Authors' conclusions Nine systematic reviews and meta-analyses

2014 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

114. Effect of erythropoietin and transfusion threshold on neurological recovery after traumatic brain injury: a randomized clinical trial. (Full text)

Effect of erythropoietin and transfusion threshold on neurological recovery after traumatic brain injury: a randomized clinical trial. There is limited information about the effect of erythropoietin or a high hemoglobin transfusion threshold after a traumatic brain injury.To compare the effects of erythropoietin and 2 hemoglobin transfusion thresholds (7 and 10 g/dL) on neurological recovery after traumatic brain injury.Randomized clinical trial of 200 patients (erythropoietin, n = 102; placebo (...) , n = 98) with closed head injury who were unable to follow commands and were enrolled within 6 hours of injury at neurosurgical intensive care units in 2 US level I trauma centers between May 2006 and August 2012. The study used a factorial design to test whether erythropoietin would fail to improve favorable outcomes by 20% and whether a hemoglobin transfusion threshold of greater than 10 g/dL would increase favorable outcomes without increasing complications. Erythropoietin or placebo

2014 JAMA PubMed

115. Optimal oxygen saturation range for adults suffering from traumatic brain injury: a review of patient benefit, harms, and guidelines

Optimal oxygen saturation range for adults suffering from traumatic brain injury: a review of patient benefit, harms, and guidelines Optimal oxygen saturation range for adults suffering from traumatic brain injury: a review of patient benefit, harms, and guidelines Optimal oxygen saturation range for adults suffering from traumatic brain injury: a review of patient benefit, harms, and guidelines CADTH Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from (...) a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation CADTH. Optimal oxygen saturation range for adults suffering from traumatic brain injury: a review of patient benefit, harms, and guidelines. Ottawa: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). Rapid Response. 2014 Authors' conclusions According to retrospective studies, hyperoxia appears to be associated with a lower likelihood of in-hospital survival compared to normoxia

2014 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

116. The Lund concept for severe traumatic brain injury. (Full text)

The Lund concept for severe traumatic brain injury. Severe traumatic brain injury is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Treatment strategies in management of such injuries are directed to the prevention of secondary brain ischaemia, as a consequence of disturbed post-traumatic cerebral blood flow. They are usually concerned with avoiding high intracranial pressure (ICP) or adequate cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). An alternative to this conventional treatment is the Lund concept (...) , which emphasises a reduction in microvascular pressures.To assess the role of the Lund concept versus other treatment modalities such as ICP-targeted therapy, CPP-targeted therapy or other possible treatment strategies in the management of severe traumatic brain injury.We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group's Specialised Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; Issue 10, 2013), MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), CINAHL Plus (EBSCO Host), ISI Web of Science (SCI-EXPANDED

2013 Cochrane PubMed

118. Paediatric Traumatic Brain Injury Consortium. Comparison of hypothermia and normothermia after severe traumatic brain injury in children (Cool Kids): a phase 3, randomised controlled trial

Paediatric Traumatic Brain Injury Consortium. Comparison of hypothermia and normothermia after severe traumatic brain injury in children (Cool Kids): a phase 3, randomised controlled trial PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

2013 PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club

119. Meta-analysis of Glasgow Coma Scale and Simplified Motor Score in predicting traumatic brain injury outcomes

Meta-analysis of Glasgow Coma Scale and Simplified Motor Score in predicting traumatic brain injury outcomes Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2013 DARE.

120. Guidelines for concussion/mild traumatic brain injury & persistent symptoms: second edition - for adults (18+ years of age)

Guidelines for concussion/mild traumatic brain injury & persistent symptoms: second edition - for adults (18+ years of age) The project team would like to acknowledge the Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation (ONF), who initiated and funded the development of the original guideline, as well as the current update. ONF is an applied health research organization with a focus on improving the quality of lives for people with an acquired brain injury or spinal cord injury, and on preventing neurotrauma (...) and resources found within the Guidelines for Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury & Persistent Symptoms are intended to inform and instruct care providers and other stakeholders who deliver services to adults who have sustained or are suspected of having sustained a concussion/mTBI. These guidelines are not intended for use with patients or clients under the age of 18 years. These guidelines are not intended for use by people who have sustained or are suspected of having sustained a concussion/mTBI

2013 CPG Infobase