Latest & greatest articles for traumatic brain injury

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Top results for traumatic brain injury

161. Blast-related traumatic brain injury in u.s. Military personnel. (PubMed)

Blast-related traumatic brain injury in u.s. Military personnel.

2011 NEJM

162. A systematic review of factors contributing to outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury (PubMed)

A systematic review of factors contributing to outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury To review, systematically, factors contributing to outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury.Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death and disability. Several studies have determined the significant predictors of outcomes after traumatic brain injury. The comprehensive identification of these reliable factors for traumatic brain injury is critical to both clinical practice (...) and research.Systematic literature review.Eligible studies that combined at least two variables to predict outcomes in patient with traumatic brain injury were identified via electronic database searches, footnote chasing and contact with clinical experts. Quality of selected studies was assessed in terms of internal and external validity using 15 questions. Two reviewers independently examined titles, abstracts and whether each met the predefined inclusion criteria.A total of 46 studies which met review criteria

2011 EvidenceUpdates

163. Detection of blast-related traumatic brain injury in U.S. military personnel. (Full text)

Detection of blast-related traumatic brain injury in U.S. military personnel. Blast-related traumatic brain injuries have been common in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, but fundamental questions about the nature of these injuries remain unanswered.We tested the hypothesis that blast-related traumatic brain injury causes traumatic axonal injury, using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), an advanced form of magnetic resonance imaging that is sensitive to axonal injury. The subjects were 63 U.S (...) . military personnel who had a clinical diagnosis of mild, uncomplicated traumatic brain injury. They were evacuated from the field to the Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Landstuhl, Germany, where they underwent DTI scanning within 90 days after the injury. All the subjects had primary blast exposure plus another, blast-related mechanism of injury (e.g., being struck by a blunt object or injured in a fall or motor vehicle crash). Controls consisted of 21 military personnel who had blast exposure

2011 NEJM PubMed

164. Traumatic brain injury and depression.

Traumatic brain injury and depression. Traumatic brain injury and depression. Traumatic brain injury and depression. Guillamondegui OD, Montgomery SA, Phibbs FT, McPheeters ML, Alexander PT, Jerome RN, McKoy JN, Seroogy JJ, Eicken JJ, Krishnaswami S, Salomon RM, Hartmann KE. Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Guillamondegui (...) OD, Montgomery SA, Phibbs FT, McPheeters ML, Alexander PT, Jerome RN, McKoy JN, Seroogy JJ, Eicken JJ, Krishnaswami S, Salomon RM, Hartmann KE.. Traumatic brain injury and depression. Rockville: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Comparative Effectiveness Review No. 25. 2011 Authors' objectives The Vanderbilt Evidence-based Practice Center systematically reviewed evidence addressing key questions on depression after traumatic brain injury, including prevalence, optimizing timing

2011 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

165. Early resuscitation of children with moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury

Early resuscitation of children with moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

2011 PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club

166. Hypertonic sodium solutions vs mannitol in reducing ICP in traumatic brain injury

Hypertonic sodium solutions vs mannitol in reducing ICP in traumatic brain injury BestBets: Hypertonic sodium solutions vs mannitol in reducing ICP in traumatic brain injury Hypertonic sodium solutions vs mannitol in reducing ICP in traumatic brain injury Report By: Annette Rickard - SpR Emergency Medicine Search checked by Tony Kehoe - Consultant Emergency Medicine Institution: Derriford Hospital, Plymouth, UK Date Submitted: 30th April 2010 Date Completed: 20th January 2011 Last Modified (...) : 20th January 2011 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and signs of raised intracranial pressure (ICP)] are [hypertonic sodium solutions better than mannitol] at [reducing morbidity and mortality]? Clinical Scenario A 54 year old female pedestrian has been hit by a bus. She is brought into the ED by ambulance. Her GCS is 13 on arrival and examination reveals an isolated head injury with a haematoma over the left occiput. CT confirms a right

2011 BestBETS

167. Prehospital rapid sequence intubation improves functional outcome for patients with severe traumatic brain injury: a randomized controlled trial (PubMed)

Prehospital rapid sequence intubation improves functional outcome for patients with severe traumatic brain injury: a randomized controlled trial To determine whether paramedic rapid sequence intubation in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) improves neurologic outcomes at 6 months compared with intubation in the hospital.Severe TBI is associated with a high rate of mortality and long-term morbidity. Comatose patients with TBI routinely undergo endo-tracheal intubation to protect

2011 EvidenceUpdates

168. Progesterone for acute traumatic brain injury. (PubMed)

Progesterone for acute traumatic brain injury. Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death and disability. Progesterone is a potential neuroprotective drug to treat patients with traumatic brain injury.To assess the effectiveness and safety of progesterone in people with acute traumatic brain injury (TBI).We searched: the Cochrane Injuries Group's Specialised Register (to April 2010), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials 2010, Issue 1 (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (Ovid

2011 Cochrane

169. Decompressive craniectomy in diffuse traumatic brain injury. (Full text)

Decompressive craniectomy in diffuse traumatic brain injury. It is unclear whether decompressive craniectomy improves the functional outcome in patients with severe traumatic brain injury and refractory raised intracranial pressure.From December 2002 through April 2010, we randomly assigned 155 adults with severe diffuse traumatic brain injury and intracranial hypertension that was refractory to first-tier therapies to undergo either bifrontotemporoparietal decompressive craniectomy or standard (...) group (19%) and the standard-care group (18%).In adults with severe diffuse traumatic brain injury and refractory intracranial hypertension, early bifrontotemporoparietal decompressive craniectomy decreased intracranial pressure and the length of stay in the ICU but was associated with more unfavorable outcomes. (Funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia and others; DECRA Australian Clinical Trials Registry number, ACTRN012605000009617.).

2011 NEJM PubMed

170. Effect of tranexamic acid in traumatic brain injury: a nested randomised, placebo controlled trial (CRASH-2 Intracranial Bleeding Study). (Full text)

Effect of tranexamic acid in traumatic brain injury: a nested randomised, placebo controlled trial (CRASH-2 Intracranial Bleeding Study). To assess the effect of tranexamic acid (which reduces bleeding in surgical patients and reduces mortality due to bleeding in trauma patients) on intracranial haemorrhage in patients with traumatic brain injury.A nested, randomised, placebo controlled trial. All investigators were masked to treatment allocation. All analyses were by intention to treat (...) . Patients 270 adult trauma patients with, or at risk of, significant extracranial bleeding within 8 hours of injury, who also had traumatic brain injury.Patients randomly allocated to tranexamic acid (loading dose 1 g over 10 minutes, then infusion of 1 g over 8 hours) or matching placebo.Intracranial haemorrhage growth (measured by computed tomography) between hospital admission and then 24-48 hours later, with adjustment for Glasgow coma score, age, time from injury to the scans, and initial

2011 BMJ PubMed

171. Is Progesterone Therapy Beneficial for Acute Traumatic Brain Injury?

Is Progesterone Therapy Beneficial for Acute Traumatic Brain Injury? SystematicReviewSnapshot TAKE-HOME MESSAGE Progesterone therapy may improve mortality and neurologic disability in patients with traumatic brain injury, but the current evidence is insuf?cient. A multicenter phase III trial sponsored by the National Institutes of Health will enhance the existing evidence. METHODS DATA SOURCES Data sources were Cochrane In- juries Group’s Specialized Regis- ter, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS (...) measures assess- ing progesterone versus no pro- gesterone (or placebo) for the treatment of acute traumatic brain injury were included. Only natural progesterone administered within 24 hours of the head injury in any dose, by any route, and for any duration was considered as a treatment. Is Progesterone Therapy Bene?cial for Acute Traumatic Brain Injury? EBEM Commentators John Pettey Sandifer, MD Alan E. Jones, MD Department of Emergency Medicine University of Mississippi Medical Center Jackson, MS

2011 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

172. GFAP and S100B are biomarkers of traumatic brain injury: an observational cohort study (PubMed)

GFAP and S100B are biomarkers of traumatic brain injury: an observational cohort study Biomarker levels in blood after traumatic brain injury (TBI) may offer diagnostic and prognostic tools in addition to clinical indices. This study aims to validate glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and S100B concentrations in blood as outcome predictors of TBI using cutoff levels of 1.5 μg/L for GFAP and 1.13 μg/L for S100B from a previous study.In 79 patients with TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale score [GCS] ≤12 (...) ), serum, taken at hospital admission, was analyzed for GFAP and S100B. Data collected included injury mechanism, age, gender, mass lesion on CT, GCS, pupillary reactions, Injury Severity Score (ISS), presence of hypoxia, and hypotension. Outcome was assessed, using the Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (dichotomized in death vs alive and unfavorable vs favorable), 6 months post injury.In patients who died compared to alive patients, median serum levels were increased: GFAP 33.4-fold and S100B 2.1-fold

2011 EvidenceUpdates

173. Guidelines for the prescription of a seated wheelchair or mobility scooter for people with a traumatic brain injury or spinal cord injury

Guidelines for the prescription of a seated wheelchair or mobility scooter for people with a traumatic brain injury or spinal cord injury Guidelines for the prescription of a seated wheelchair or mobility scooter for people with a traumatic brain injury or spinal cord injury Guidelines for the prescription of a seated wheelchair or mobility scooter for people with a traumatic brain injury or spinal cord injury 2 Guidelines for the prescription of a seated wheelchair or mobility scooter (...) for people with a traumatic brain injury or spinal cord injury This publication is endorsed by Occupational Therapy (OT) Australia – NSW Division You may copy, distribute, display and otherwise freely deal with this work for any purpose, provided that you attribute the LTCSA and EnableNSW as the owners. However, you must obtain permission if you wish to (1) charge others for access to the work (other than at cost), (2) include the work in advertising or a product for sale, or (3) modify the work. ISBN

2011 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

174. Predictors of extended rehabilitation length of stay after traumatic brain injury (PubMed)

Predictors of extended rehabilitation length of stay after traumatic brain injury To develop a prediction rule for acutely identifying patients at risk for extended rehabilitation length of stay (LOS) after traumatic brain injury (TBI) by using demographic and injury characteristics.Retrospective cohort study.Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems.Sample of TBI survivors (N=7284) with injuries occurring between 1999 and 2009.Not applicable.Extended rehabilitation LOS defined as 67 days (...) or longer.A multivariable model was built containing FIM motor and cognitive scores at admission, preinjury level of education, cause of injury, punctate/petechial hemorrhage, acute-care LOS, and primary payor source. The model had good calibration, excellent discrimination (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = .875), and validated well. Based on this model, a formula for determining the probability of extended rehabilitation LOS and a prediction rule that classifies patients

2010 EvidenceUpdates

175. Therapeutic hypothermia for paediatric traumatic brain injury

Therapeutic hypothermia for paediatric traumatic brain injury BestBets: Therapeutic hypothermia for paediatric traumatic brain injury within 8 hr Therapeutic hypothermia for paediatric traumatic brain injury within 8 hr Report By: Gabriel Cade - Emergency Medicine Physician Search checked by Venkatesh Gattu - Senior Emergency Medicine Trainee Institution: Baystate Medical Center aSpringfield, MA 01199, USA nd Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, UK Date Submitted: 12th December 2009 Date (...) Completed: 9th July 2010 Last Modified: 9th July 2010 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [paediatric patients presenting within 8 h of traumatic brain injury (TBI)] are [therapeutic hypothermia regimens better than normothermic care] in [improving patient survival]? Clinical Scenario An 8-year old child presents to the Emergency Department within six hours of an unclear incident at home which left nonspecific bruising and acute change in mental status. Fundoscopic exam reveals retinal

2010 BestBETS

176. Intensive insulin therapy in severe traumatic brain injury: a randomized trial (PubMed)

Intensive insulin therapy in severe traumatic brain injury: a randomized trial Intensive insulin therapy (IIT) has been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Little investigation has been done to find out whether it improves the prognosis of patients with severe traumatic brain injury (STBI).We conducted a prospective controlled study where adult patients with blunt STBI, with Glasgow Coma Scale

2010 EvidenceUpdates

177. Rates of major depressive disorder and clinical outcomes following traumatic brain injury. (Full text)

Rates of major depressive disorder and clinical outcomes following traumatic brain injury. Uncertainties exist about the rates, predictors, and outcomes of major depressive disorder (MDD) among individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI).To describe MDD-related rates, predictors, outcomes, and treatment during the first year after TBI.Cohort from June 2001 through March 2005 followed up by structured telephone interviews at months 1 through 6, 8, 10, and 12 (data collection ending February (...) and 21% at 6 months. In a multivariate model, risk of MDD after TBI was associated with MDD at the time of injury (risk ratio [RR], 1.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.37-1.91), history of MDD prior to injury (but not at the time of injury) (RR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.31-1.82), age (RR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.44-0.83 for > or = 60 years vs 18-29 years), and lifetime alcohol dependence (RR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.14-1.57). Those with MDD were more likely to report comorbid anxiety disorders after TBI than those without

2010 JAMA PubMed

178. Is albumin use SAFE in patients with traumatic brain injury? (Full text)

Is albumin use SAFE in patients with traumatic brain injury? Is albumin use SAFE in patients with traumatic brain injury? | Critical Care | Full Text Advertisement Menu Search Search all BMC articles Search Menu We'd love your feedback. Please complete this 3 question Table of Contents , Luis A Diaz , Eric B Milbrandt , Ali Al-Khafaji and Joseph M Darby Critical Care 2010 14 :307 © BioMed Central Ltd 2010 Published: 9 April 2010 Evidence-Based Medicine Journal Club Edited by: Eric B Milbrandt (...) . University of Pittsburgh Department of Critical Care Medicine Citation Myburgh J, Cooper DJ, Finfer S, Bellomo R, Norton R, Bishop N, Kai LS, Vallance S: Saline or albumin for fluid resuscitation in patients with traumatic brain injury. N Engl J Med 2007, 357:874-884 [ ]. Background The Saline versus Albumin Fluid Evaluation study suggested that patients with traumatic brain injury resuscitated with albumin had a higher mortality rate than those resuscitated with saline. The SAFE investigators conducted

2010 Critical Care - EBM Journal Club PubMed

179. Haemostatic drugs for traumatic brain injury. (Full text)

Haemostatic drugs for traumatic brain injury. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability. Intracranial bleeding is a common complication of TBI, and intracranial bleeding can develop or worsen after hospital admission. Haemostatic drugs may reduce the occurrence or size of intracranial bleeds and consequently lower the morbidity and mortality associated with TBI.To assess the effects of haemostatic drugs on mortality, disability and thrombotic complications (...) in patients with traumatic brain injury.We searched the electronic databases: Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register (3 February 2009), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 1), MEDLINE (1950 to Week 3 2009), PubMed (searched 3 February 2009 (last 180 days)), EMBASE (1980 to Week 4 2009), CINAHL (1982 to January 2009), ISI Web of Science: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED) (1970 to January 2009), ISI Web of Science: Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science (CPCI-S) (1990

2010 Cochrane PubMed

180. The Cognitive Effects of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Resulting Postconcussion Syndrome in High Risk Patients

The Cognitive Effects of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Resulting Postconcussion Syndrome in High Risk Patients "The Cognitive Effects of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Resulting Pos" by Terrance Hartmann < > > > > > Title Author Date of Graduation 8-14-2010 Degree Type Capstone Project Degree Name Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies First Advisor Dr. Mark Pedemonte, MD Second Advisor Annjanette Sommers MS, PAC Third Advisor Rob Rosenow PharmD, OD Rights . Abstract Background (...) : Mild traumatic brain injury with postconcussion syndromes may be correlated with long term cognitive deficits. While 1.7 million traumatic brain injuries are reported each year, this number does not account for the many mild traumatic brain injuries that are not reported each year. Methods: Exhaustive search of available medical literature using the search engines: OVID, CINAHL, Entrez, and UpToDate. Keywords used were Mild Traumatic Brain Injury, Cognitive Disorders, Psychological Disorders

2010 Pacific University EBM Capstone Project