Latest & greatest articles for urinary tract infection

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Top results for urinary tract infection

181. Antibiotic prophylaxis for children at risk of developing urinary tract infection: a systematic review

Antibiotic prophylaxis for children at risk of developing urinary tract infection: a systematic review Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2009 DARE.

182. Bladder irrigation with amphotericin B and fungal urinary tract infection: systematic review with meta-analysis

Bladder irrigation with amphotericin B and fungal urinary tract infection: systematic review with meta-analysis Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2009 DARE.

183. Management of childhood urinary tract infections: an economic modeling study

Management of childhood urinary tract infections: an economic modeling study Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2009 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

184. Immunoactive prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections: a meta-analysis

Immunoactive prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections: a meta-analysis Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2009 DARE.

185. Prophylaxis after first febrile urinary tract infection in children? A multicenter, randomized, controlled, noninferiority trial (PubMed)

Prophylaxis after first febrile urinary tract infection in children? A multicenter, randomized, controlled, noninferiority trial Febrile urinary tract infections are common in children and associated with the risk for renal scarring and long-term complications. Antimicrobial prophylaxis has been used to reduce the risk for recurrence. We performed a study to determine whether no prophylaxis is similar to antimicrobial prophylaxis for 12 months in reducing the recurrence of febrile urinary tract (...) infections in children after a first febrile urinary tract infection.The study was a controlled, randomized, open-label, 2-armed, noninferiority trial comparing no prophylaxis with prophylaxis (co-trimoxazole 15 mg/kg per day or co-amoxiclav 15 mg/kg per day) for 12 months. A total of 338 children who were aged 2 months to <7 years and had a first episode of febrile urinary tract infection were enrolled: 309 with a confirmed pyelonephritis on a technetium 99m dimercaptosuccinic acid scan with or without

2008 EvidenceUpdates

186. Antibiotic duration for treating uncomplicated, symptomatic lower urinary tract infections in elderly women. (PubMed)

Antibiotic duration for treating uncomplicated, symptomatic lower urinary tract infections in elderly women. Urinary tract infections (UTI) are common in elderly patients. Authors of non systematic literature reviews often recommend longer treatment durations (7 to 14 days) for older women, but the evidence for such recommendations is unclear.To determine the optimal duration of antibiotic treatment for uncomplicated symptomatic lower UTI in elderly women.We contacted known investigators

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2008 Cochrane

187. Oestrogens for preventing recurrent urinary tract infection in postmenopausal women. (PubMed)

Oestrogens for preventing recurrent urinary tract infection in postmenopausal women. Recurrent urinary tract infection (RUTI) is defined as three episodes of urinary tract infection (UTI) in the previous 12 months or two episodes in the last six months. The main factors associated with RUTI in postmenopausal women are vesical prolapse, cystocoele, post-voidal residue and urinary incontinence, all associated with a decrease in oestrogen. The use of oestrogens to prevent RUTI has been proposed.To

2008 Cochrane

188. Cranberries for preventing urinary tract infections. (PubMed)

Cranberries for preventing urinary tract infections. Cranberries have been used widely for several decades for the prevention and treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs).To assess the effectiveness of cranberry products in preventing UTIs in susceptible populations.We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library) and the Internet. We contacted companies involved with the promotion and distribution of cranberry preparations

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2008 Cochrane

189. Fosfomycin: use beyond urinary tract and gastrointestinal infections

Fosfomycin: use beyond urinary tract and gastrointestinal infections Fosfomycin: use beyond urinary tract and gastrointestinal infections Fosfomycin: use beyond urinary tract and gastrointestinal infections Falagas M E, Giannopoulou K P, Kokolakis G N, Rafailidis P I CRD summary The authors concluded that fosfomycin might be considered as an alternative treatment for gram-positive and gram-negative infections, except for urinary tract and gastrointestinal infections. There was limited evidence (...) from diverse, predominantly observational studies. The lack of reporting of review methods and study quality make it difficult to comment on the reliability of the authors’ conclusions. Authors' objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of fosfomycin for the treatment of gram-positive and gram-negative infections other than urinary tract and gastrointestinal infections. Searching PubMed and SCOPUS were searched for studies published in English, German or French between 1971 and January

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2008 DARE.

190. Cranberries can prevent recurrent urinary tract infections in women

Cranberries can prevent recurrent urinary tract infections in women PEARLS Practical Evidence About Real Life Situations PEARLS are succinct summaries of Cochrane Systematic Reviews for primary care practitioners. They Cranberries can prevent recurrent urinary tract infections in women Clinical question How effective are cranberry products in preventing urinary tract infections (UTIs) in susceptible populations? Bottom line There was some evidence that cranberries (juice or capsules) may (...) needs to be taken to be effective or what the required dose might be. Context No definite mechanism of action has been established for cranberries in the prevention or treatment of UTI. However, the main suggestion is cranberries prevent bacteria, particularly Escherichia coli, from adhering to uroepithelial cells lining the bladder. Without adhesion, E. coli cannot infect the mucosal surface of the urinary tract. Cochrane Systematic Review Jepson RG and Craig JC. Cranberries for preventing urinary

2008 Cochrane PEARLS

191. Review: cranberry products may prevent urinary tract infection in women with recurrent infections

Review: cranberry products may prevent urinary tract infection in women with recurrent infections Review: cranberry products may prevent urinary tract infection in women with recurrent infections | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts (...) OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Review: cranberry products may prevent urinary tract infection in women with recurrent infections Article Text Therapeutics Review: cranberry products may prevent urinary tract infection in women

2008 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

192. Review: cranberry products may prevent urinary tract infection in women with recurrent infections

Review: cranberry products may prevent urinary tract infection in women with recurrent infections Review: cranberry products may prevent urinary tract infection in women with recurrent infectionsCommentary | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal (...) accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Review: cranberry products may prevent urinary tract infection in women with recurrent infectionsCommentary Article Text Treatment Review: cranberry products may prevent urinary tract

2008 Evidence-Based Nursing

193. Does This Child Have a Urinary Tract Infection? (PubMed)

Does This Child Have a Urinary Tract Infection? Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a frequently occurring pediatric illness that, if left untreated, can lead to permanent renal injury. Accordingly, accurate diagnosis of UTI is important.To review the diagnostic accuracy of symptoms and signs for the diagnosis of UTI in infants and children.A search of MEDLINE and EMBASE databases was conducted for articles published between 1966 and October 2007, as well as a manual review of bibliographies (...) findings in identifying infants with a UTI (for temperature >39 degrees C for >48 hours without another potential source for fever on examination, the LR for all findings present was 4.0; 95% CI, 1.2-13.0; and for temperature <39 degrees C with another source for fever, the LR was 0.37; 95% CI, 0.16-0.85). In verbal children, abdominal pain (LR, 6.3; 95% CI, 2.5-16.0), back pain (LR, 3.6; 95% CI, 2.1-6.1), dysuria, frequency, or both (LR range, 2.2-2.8), and new-onset urinary incontinence (LR, 4.6; 95

2007 JAMA

194. Modes of administration of antibiotics for symptomatic severe urinary tract infections. (PubMed)

Modes of administration of antibiotics for symptomatic severe urinary tract infections. Urinary tract infection (UTI), worldwide, is a major source of disease in children and adults. As it may have long-term consequences such as kidney failure and hypertension, it is important to treat patients with UTI adequately. Although standard management of severe UTI usually means intravenous (IV) therapy, at least initially, there are studies showing that oral therapy may also be effective.To assess

2007 Cochrane

195. Methenamine hippurate for preventing urinary tract infections. (PubMed)

Methenamine hippurate for preventing urinary tract infections. Methenamine salts are often used as an alternative to antibiotics for the prevention of urinary tract infection (UTI).To assess the benefits and harms of methenamine hippurate in preventing UTI.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (from 1950), EMBASE (from 1980), reference lists of articles and abstracts from conference proceedings without language restriction (...) not interpretable because of underlying heterogeneity. Subgroup analyses suggested that methenamine hippurate may have some benefit in patients without renal tract abnormalities (symptomatic UTI: RR 0.24, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.89; bacteriuria: RR 0.56, 95% CI 0.37 to 0.83), but not in patients with known renal tract abnormalities (symptomatic UTI: RR 1.54, 95% CI 0.38 to 6.20; bacteriuria: RR 1.29, 95% CI 0.54 to 3.07). For short-term treatment duration (1 week or less) there was a significant reduction

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2007 Cochrane

196. Recurrent urinary tract infections in children: risk factors and association with prophylactic antimicrobials. (PubMed)

Recurrent urinary tract infections in children: risk factors and association with prophylactic antimicrobials. The evidence regarding risk factors for recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) and the risks and benefits of antimicrobial prophylaxis in children is scant.To identify risk factors for recurrent UTI in a pediatric primary care cohort, to determine the association between antimicrobial prophylaxis and recurrent UTI, and to identify the risk factors for resistance among recurrent (...) among children with recurrent UTI (HR, 7.50; 95% CI, 1.60-35.17).Among the children in this study, antimicrobial prophylaxis was not associated with decreased risk of recurrent UTI, but was associated with increased risk of resistant infections.

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2007 JAMA

197. Trimethoprim reduced dysuria in women with symptoms of urinary tract infection but negative urine dipstick test results

Trimethoprim reduced dysuria in women with symptoms of urinary tract infection but negative urine dipstick test results Trimethoprim reduced dysuria in women with symptoms of urinary tract infection but negative urine dipstick test results | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your (...) username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Trimethoprim reduced dysuria in women with symptoms of urinary tract infection but negative urine dipstick test results Article Text Therapeutics

2007 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

198. Urinary tract infection in under 16s: diagnosis and management

Urinary tract infection in under 16s: diagnosis and management Urinary tr Urinary tract infection in under 16s: act infection in under 16s: diagnosis and management diagnosis and management Clinical guideline Published: 22 August 2007 nice.org.uk/guidance/cg54 © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Y Y our responsibility our responsibility The recommendations in this guideline represent the view of NICE (...) in this guideline should be interpreted in a way that would be inconsistent with complying with those duties. Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible. Urinary tract infection in under 16s: diagnosis and management (CG54) © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions

2007 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

199. Evaluation of home care utility: pneumonia, cerebrovascular disease, urinary tract infections and postsurgical infections

Evaluation of home care utility: pneumonia, cerebrovascular disease, urinary tract infections and postsurgical infections Evaluation of home care utility: pneumonia, cerebrovascular disease, urinary tract infections and postsurgical infections Evaluation of home care utility: pneumonia, cerebrovascular disease, urinary tract infections and postsurgical infections Augustovski F, Pichon Riviere A, Alcaraz A, Bardach A, Ferrante D, Garcia Marti S, Glujovsky D, Lopez A, Regueiro A Record Status (...) This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Augustovski F, Pichon Riviere A, Alcaraz A, Bardach A, Ferrante D, Garcia Marti S, Glujovsky D, Lopez A, Regueiro A. Evaluation of home care utility: pneumonia, cerebrovascular disease, urinary tract infections and postsurgical infections. Buenos Aires: Institute for Clinical Effectiveness and Health Policy (IECS). Informe de

2007 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

200. Does this child have a urinary tract infection?

Does this child have a urinary tract infection? Does this child have a urinary tract infection? Does this child have a urinary tract infection? Shaikh N, Morone N E, Lopez J, Chianese J, Sangvai S, D'Amico F, Hoberman A, Wald E R CRD summary This review assessed the diagnostic accuracy of signs and symptoms for urinary tract infection (UTI) in children. The authors concluded that individual signs and symptoms are useful but insufficient to diagnose UTI, whereas combinations can be used (...) to identify children with a low likelihood of UTI. The review was generally well conducted, but the data presented were sparse and weak, rendering the authors' conclusions somewhat optimistic. Authors' objectives To assess the diagnostic accuracy of signs and symptoms for the diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI) in children. Searching MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched from inception to October 2007; the search terms were reported. The bibliographies of all included studies, one previous systematic

2007 DARE.