Latest & greatest articles for acetaminophen

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Top results for acetaminophen

1. Oral Paracetamol vs Oral Ibuprofen in Patent Ductus Arteriosus: A Randomized, Controlled, Noninferiority Trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

Oral Paracetamol vs Oral Ibuprofen in Patent Ductus Arteriosus: A Randomized, Controlled, Noninferiority Trial Oral Paracetamol vs Oral Ibuprofen in Patent Ductus Arteriosus: A Randomized, Controlled, Noninferiority Trial - PubMed This site needs JavaScript to work properly. Please enable it to take advantage of the complete set of features! Clipboard, Search History, and several other advanced features are temporarily unavailable. National Institutes of Health National Library of Medicine (...) RSS Cancel RSS Link Copy Actions Cite Share Permalink Copy Page navigation J Pediatr Actions . 2020 Jul;222:79-84.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2020.01.058. Epub 2020 Apr 24. Oral Paracetamol vs Oral Ibuprofen in Patent Ductus Arteriosus: A Randomized, Controlled, Noninferiority Trial , , , , , , , , , , Affiliations Expand Affiliations 1 Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India; Department of Pediatrics, Research

2020 EvidenceUpdates

2. Comparing the analgesic effect of intravenous paracetamol with morphine on patients with renal colic pain: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled studies

Comparing the analgesic effect of intravenous paracetamol with morphine on patients with renal colic pain: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled studies Comparing the Analgesic Effect of Intravenous Paracetamol With Morphine on Patients With Renal Colic Pain: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Studies - PubMed This site needs JavaScript to work properly. Please enable it to take advantage of the complete set of features! Clipboard, Search History, and several other advanced features (...) software Create file Cancel Your RSS Feed Name of RSS Feed: Number of items displayed: Create RSS Cancel RSS Link Copy Actions Cite Share Permalink Copy Page navigation Review Am J Emerg Med Actions . 2020 Apr 2;S0735-6757(20)30217-5. doi: 10.1016/j.ajem.2020.03.061. Online ahead of print. Comparing the Analgesic Effect of Intravenous Paracetamol With Morphine on Patients With Renal Colic Pain: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Studies , , , Affiliations Expand Affiliations 1 Department

2020 EvidenceUpdates

3. Acetaminophen vs. NSAIDs during COVID-19 pandemic

and clinical recommendations for COVID-19. We offer this common sense review about treating pain and fever for viral infections: Relieving fever and treating pain are comfort measures that can help people stay active and/or maintain good eating and sleeping patterns, but are NOT needed to shorten the duration of illness. Acetaminophen (generic and Tylenol, also the same as paracetamol and Panadol, etc.) can help some types of pain and can lower the temperature in fever. Follow package instructions and do (...) that ibuprofen or other NSAIDs are dangerous in COVID-19 infection, but for various reasons acetaminophen/paracetamol is generally the safest alternative to treat symptomatic fever or for mild pain. Thomas L. Perry MD, FRCPC Sick patients with COVID 19 pneumonia are being treated with fluid restriction. Adding NSAIDs would increase the risk of renal failure. Best to use acetaminophen or just nonpharmaceutical treatments like warm sponging and a fan. Leave a Reply Your email address will not be published

2020 Therapeutics Letter

4. Randomized Clinical Trial of IV Acetaminophen as an Adjunct to IV Hydromorphone for Acute Severe Pain in Emergency Department Patients

, David F, Scholl L. Increases in drug and opioid-involved overdose deaths United States, 2010-2015. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2016;65:1445-52. Skinner HB. Multimodal acute pain management. Am J Orthop 2004;33:5-9. McNicol ED, Ferguson MC, Haroutounian S, Carr DB, Schumann R. Single dose intravenous paracetamol or intravenous propacetamol for postoperative pain. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2016;(5):CD007125. Chang AK, Bijur PE, Ata A, et al. Randomized clinical trial of intravenous acetaminophen (...) Randomized Clinical Trial of IV Acetaminophen as an Adjunct to IV Hydromorphone for Acute Severe Pain in Emergency Department Patients Randomized Clinical Trial of Intravenous (IV) Acetaminophen as an Adjunct to IV Hydromorphone for Acute Severe Pain in Emergency Department Patients - PubMed This site needs JavaScript to work properly. Please enable it to take advantage of the complete set of features! Welcome to the new PubMed. For legacy PubMed go to . Clipboard, Search History, and several

2020 EvidenceUpdates

5. Ibuprofen Plus Acetaminophen Versus Ibuprofen Alone for Acute Low Back Pain: An Emergency Department-based Randomized Study (Abstract)

Ibuprofen Plus Acetaminophen Versus Ibuprofen Alone for Acute Low Back Pain: An Emergency Department-based Randomized Study Patients with low back pain (LBP) are often treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). NSAIDs are modestly effective for LBP, but many patients with LBP continue to suffer despite treatment with these medications. We compared pain and functional outcomes 1 week after emergency department (ED) discharge among patients randomized to a 1-week course (...) of ibuprofen plus acetaminophen versus ibuprofen plus placebo.This was a randomized, double-blind study conducted in two urban EDs. Patients presenting with acute, nontraumatic, nonradicular LBP of no more than 2 weeks' duration were eligible for enrollment immediately prior to discharge from an ED if they had a score > 5 on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ), a 24-item validated instrument, indicating more than minimal functional impairment. All patients were given a standardized 10-minute

2020 EvidenceUpdates

6. Achilles tendinopathy: Paracetamol and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)

Achilles tendinopathy: Paracetamol and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) Paracetamol and NSAIDs | Prescribing information | Achilles tendinopathy | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Paracetamol and NSAIDs Achilles tendinopathy: Paracetamol and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) Last revised in June 2020 Paracetamol and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) For detailed prescribing information on paracetamol and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), see the CKS

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

7. Post-herpetic neuralgia: Paracetamol and codeine

Post-herpetic neuralgia: Paracetamol and codeine Paracetamol and codeine | Prescribing information | Post-herpetic neuralgia | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Paracetamol and codeine Post-herpetic neuralgia: Paracetamol and codeine Last revised in July 2017 Paracetamol and codeine For detailed prescribing information on paracetamol and codeine, please see the CKS topic on . © .

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

8. Sore throat: paracetamol is the best option

Sore throat: paracetamol is the best option Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''Sore throat: paracetamol is the best option'', 1 December 2019 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > Sore throat: paracetamol is the best option Spotlight Every month, the subjects in Prescrire’s Spotlight. 100 most recent :  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |  Spotlight Sore throat: paracetamol is the best option Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs (...) ) appear to be somewhat more effective than paracetamol, but they expose patients to more serious side effects. Throat infections and pharyngitis are frequent; most often they are of viral origin and non-serious. These include sore throats that make swallowing difficult, which are soothed by sucking on hard candy, with or without sugar, and having hot or iced drinks. Paracetamol is often used to relieve sore throats, especially for self-medication. According to available randomised clinical trials

2019 Prescrire

9. Preemptive Oral Compared With Intravenous Acetaminophen for Postoperative Pain After Robotic-Assisted Laparoscopic Hysterectomy: A Randomized Controlled Trial (Abstract)

Preemptive Oral Compared With Intravenous Acetaminophen for Postoperative Pain After Robotic-Assisted Laparoscopic Hysterectomy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

2019 EvidenceUpdates

10. Alcoholic liver disease: Is acetaminophen safe?

Alcoholic liver disease: Is acetaminophen safe? Alcoholic liver disease: Is acetaminophen safe? Toggle navigation Shared more. Cited more. Safe forever. Toggle navigation View Item JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Search MOspace This Collection Browse Statistics Alcoholic liver disease: Is acetaminophen safe? View/ Open Date 2007-08 Format Metadata Abstract Yes—acetaminophen is a safe and effective analgesic that can be appropriately (...) used for adult patients with stable chronic alcoholic liver disease for at least a short period of time (studies have been limited to a maximum of 48-72 hours), up to the maximum recommended dosage of 4 g daily (strength of recommendation: A, based on 2 RCTs and other studies). There are little data to guide longer-term use of acetaminophen in this situation. URI Part of Citation Journal of Family Practice, 56(8) 2007: 673-674. Rights OpenAccess. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons

2019 Clinical Inquiries

11. Paracetamol: patients need to be more aware of the harms

Paracetamol: patients need to be more aware of the harms Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''Paracetamol: patients need to be more aware of the harms'', 1 October 2019 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > Paracetamol: patients need to be more aware of the harms Spotlight Every month, the subjects in Prescrire’s Spotlight. 100 most recent :  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |  Spotlight Paracetamol: patients need to be more aware (...) of the harms In France, 20% of patients seem to be unaware that paracetamol is toxic at high doses, especially to the liver, and around 30% are unaware that alcohol aggravates this toxicity. Paracetamol is the first-choice analgesic drug for mild to moderate pain. Its adverse effects are mainly related to overdoses that expose people to severe liver damage and kidney failure. It is marketed alone or in combination with other substances under numerous trade names. This exposes the patient to unknowingly

2019 Prescrire

12. Oral Paracetamol Versus Combination Oral Analgesics for Acute Musculoskeletal Injuries. (Abstract)

Oral Paracetamol Versus Combination Oral Analgesics for Acute Musculoskeletal Injuries. We compare paracetamol with a combination of paracetamol, ibuprofen, and codeine for pain relief in acute minor musculoskeletal injuries.This was a prospective, double-blind, randomized, active-controlled, parallel-arm study at an urban tertiary hospital emergency department. Participants were aged 18 to 65 years and had acute (<48 hours) closed limb or trunk injuries with moderate pain (greater than 3/10 (...) ). A single dose of 1 g of paracetamol, 400 mg of ibuprofen, and 60 mg of codeine was compared with a single dose of 1 g of paracetamol, placebo ibuprofen, and placebo codeine. The minimum detectable difference in pain was taken as 1.3.Baseline characteristics and pain were similar. There were clinically detectable reductions in pain at rest at 60 minutes for paracetamol: -1.6; 95% confidence interval (CI) -2.2 to -1.1); n=59 and the combination -2.0; 95% CI -2.5 to -1; n=59; difference -0.4; 95% CI -1.1

2019 EvidenceUpdates

13. Acetaminophen (Paracetamol) is the short-term drug of choice for orthodontic pain

Acetaminophen (Paracetamol) is the short-term drug of choice for orthodontic pain UTCAT3387, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Acetaminophen (Paracetamol) is the short-term drug of choice for orthodontic pain. Clinical Question In patients experiencing pain from orthodontic tooth movement, what is the drug of choice to relieve pain without the inhibition of orthodontic tooth movement? Clinical Bottom Line (...) effects on orthodontic tooth movement (OTM). Celecoxib inhibited OTM with 2-3 week use (p=0.03). Acetaminophen did not inhibit OTM except with use >1 month (p=0.004), while aspirin was found to inhibit orthodontic tooth movement (p=0.0008). #2) Correa et al/2017 Male Wistar Rats Systematic review of randomized trials Key results In the six studies subject to qualitative analysis, Paracetamol (Acetaminophen) did not interfere with orthodontic tooth movement. All of the other drugs tested, including

2019 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

14. Acetaminophen Safety: Risk of Mortality and Cardiovascular Events in Nursing Home Residents, a Prospective Study Full Text available with Trip Pro

Acetaminophen Safety: Risk of Mortality and Cardiovascular Events in Nursing Home Residents, a Prospective Study Acetaminophen is the most widely used analgesic today. A recent systematic review found increased adverse events and mortality at therapeutic dosage. Our aim was to challenge these results in a large sample of older adults living in nursing homes (NHs).Prospective study using data from the Impact of Educational and Professional Supportive Interventions on Nursing Home Quality (...) Indicators project (IQUARE), a multicenter, individually tailored, nonrandomized controlled trial in NHs across southwestern France.We studied data from 5429 participants living in 175 NHs (average age, 86.1 ± 8.1 years; 73.9% women).All prescriptions obtained at baseline were analyzed by a pharmacist for acetaminophen use as stand-alone or associated. Myocardial infarction (MI) and strokes were reported from participants' medical records at 18-month follow-up. Dates of death were obtained. Data

2019 EvidenceUpdates

15. Intravenous Acetaminophen Before Pelvic Organ Prolapse Repair: A Randomized Controlled Trial (Abstract)

Intravenous Acetaminophen Before Pelvic Organ Prolapse Repair: A Randomized Controlled Trial To compare the effect of preoperative intravenous (IV) acetaminophen compared with placebo on pain scores after pelvic organ prolapse surgery.This double-blind placebo-controlled multicenter trial randomized women undergoing prolapse surgery to IV acetaminophen (1,000 mg) or preoperative saline stratified by surgical route (laparoscopic or vaginal). The primary outcome was the change from baseline (...) in patient-reported visual analog scale pain scores at 24 hours after surgery. Secondary outcomes included narcotic use measured in morphine milligram equivalents, satisfaction and quality of life (QOL) using validated questionnaires on postoperative days 1 and 7, and overall side effects.Between 2014 and 2017, 204 women were enrolled and primary-outcome data from 162 were analyzed. Women had a mean (±SD) age of 66±10 years, were predominantly Caucasian (96%) and postmenopausal (96%). Acetaminophen

2019 EvidenceUpdates

16. An integrated safety analysis of combined acetaminophen and ibuprofen (Maxigesic ((R)) /Combogesic((R))) in adults Full Text available with Trip Pro

An integrated safety analysis of combined acetaminophen and ibuprofen (Maxigesic ((R)) /Combogesic((R))) in adults Acetaminophen (APAP) and ibuprofen (IBP) are two analgesic compounds with a long history of use. Both are considered safe at recommended over-the-counter daily doses. Chronic use, high doses, or concomitant medication can produce safety risks for both drugs. APAP is associated with increased risk of hepatic injury, while IBP can produce gastric bleeding and thromboembolic events

2019 EvidenceUpdates

17. Alcoholic liver disease: Is acetaminophen safe?

Alcoholic liver disease: Is acetaminophen safe? Alcoholic liver disease: Is acetaminophen safe? Toggle navigation Shared more. Cited more. Safe forever. Toggle navigation View Item JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Search MOspace This Collection Browse Statistics Alcoholic liver disease: Is acetaminophen safe? View/ Open Date 2007-08 Format Metadata Abstract Yes—acetaminophen is a safe and effective analgesic that can be appropriately (...) used for adult patients with stable chronic alcoholic liver disease for at least a short period of time (studies have been limited to a maximum of 48-72 hours), up to the maximum recommended dosage of 4 g daily (strength of recommendation: A, based on 2 RCTs and other studies). There are little data to guide longer-term use of acetaminophen in this situation. URI Part of Citation Journal of Family Practice, 56(8) 2007: 673-674. Rights OpenAccess. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons

2019 Clinical Inquiries

18. Prevention of Opioid-Induced Nausea and Vomiting During Treatment of Moderate to Severe Acute Pain: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial Comparing CL-108 (Hydrocodone 7.5 mg/Acetaminophen 325 mg/Rapid-Release, Low-Dose Promethazine 12.5 mg) with Conventi (Abstract)

Prevention of Opioid-Induced Nausea and Vomiting During Treatment of Moderate to Severe Acute Pain: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial Comparing CL-108 (Hydrocodone 7.5 mg/Acetaminophen 325 mg/Rapid-Release, Low-Dose Promethazine 12.5 mg) with Conventi To evaluate the prevention of opioid-induced nausea and vomiting (OINV) and the relief of moderate to severe acute pain by CL-108, a novel drug combining a low-dose antiemetic (rapid-release promethazine 12.5 mg) with hydrocodone 7.5 mg (...) /acetaminophen 325 mg (HC/APAP) was used.This was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo- and active-controlled multidose study. After surgical extraction of two or more impacted third molar teeth (including at least one mandibular impaction), 466 patients with moderate to severe pain (measured on a categorical pain intensity scale [PI-CAT]) were randomized to CL-108, HC/APAP, or placebo. Over the next 24 hours, patients used the PI-CAT to assess pain at regular intervals whereas nausea, vomiting

2019 EvidenceUpdates

19. Effect of Intravenous Acetaminophen vs Placebo Combined With Propofol or Dexmedetomidine on Postoperative Delirium Among Older Patients Following Cardiac Surgery: The DEXACET Randomized Clinical Trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of Intravenous Acetaminophen vs Placebo Combined With Propofol or Dexmedetomidine on Postoperative Delirium Among Older Patients Following Cardiac Surgery: The DEXACET Randomized Clinical Trial. Postoperative delirium is common following cardiac surgery and may be affected by choice of analgesic and sedative.To evaluate the effect of postoperative intravenous (IV) acetaminophen (paracetamol) vs placebo combined with IV propofol vs dexmedetomidine on postoperative delirium among older (...) patients undergoing cardiac surgery.Randomized, placebo-controlled, factorial clinical trial among 120 patients aged 60 years or older undergoing on-pump coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery or combined CABG/valve surgeries at a US center. Enrollment was September 2015 to April 2018, with follow-up ending in April 2019.Patients were randomized to 1 of 4 groups receiving postoperative analgesia with IV acetaminophen or placebo every 6 hours for 48 hours and postoperative sedation

2019 JAMA Controlled trial quality: predicted high

20. Effect of Combination of Paracetamol (Acetaminophen) and Ibuprofen vs Either Alone on Patient-Controlled Morphine Consumption in the First 24 Hours After Total Hip Arthroplasty: The PANSAID Randomized Clinical Trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of Combination of Paracetamol (Acetaminophen) and Ibuprofen vs Either Alone on Patient-Controlled Morphine Consumption in the First 24 Hours After Total Hip Arthroplasty: The PANSAID Randomized Clinical Trial. Multimodal postoperative analgesia is widely used but lacks evidence of benefit.Investigate beneficial and harmful effects of 4 nonopioid analgesics regimens.Randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled, 4-group trial in 6 Danish hospitals with 90-day follow-up that included 556 (...) patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty (THA) from December 2015 to October 2017. Final date of follow-up was January 1, 2018.Participants were randomized to receive paracetamol (acetaminophen) 1000 mg plus ibuprofen 400 mg (n = 136; PCM + IBU), paracetamol 1000 mg plus matched placebo (n = 142; PCM), ibuprofen 400 mg plus matched placebo (n = 141; IBU), or half-strength paracetamol 500 mg plus ibuprofen 200 mg (n = 140; HS-PCM + IBU) orally every 6 hours for 24 hours postoperatively, starting 1

2019 JAMA Controlled trial quality: predicted high