Latest & greatest articles for acne

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on acne or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on acne and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Acne treatment and clinical papers

Acne is a common skin condition characterised by whiteheads (or blackheads), pimples and oily skin. It can lead to possible scarring. It is typically caused when hair follicles become inflamed and the sebaceous glands in the skin are overactive. The over production of sebum and a combination of dead skin cells and dirt can clog follicles and pores causing a break out. Acne can affect any age group but it’s more common in adolescents.

There are many ways to treat acne depending on the severity of the case. Treatments include a range of medications such as topical retinoids, antibiotics and in severe cases isotretinoin is prescribed. Research is ongoing to determine the side effects and harms caused by these drugs. Clinical trials and studies are vital to assess treatment.

The Trip Database has an extensive collection of articles on acne ranging from clinical trials, systematic reviews, clinical guidelines and case reports. These can be found via searching the site.

Top results for acne

1. New advice from the MHRA regarding cyproterone acetate: how does this affect prescribing of Co-cyprindiol/Dianette® for acne/hirsutism? July 2020

New advice from the MHRA regarding cyproterone acetate: how does this affect prescribing of Co-cyprindiol/Dianette® for acne/hirsutism? July 2020 1 FSRH CEU Statement : New advice from the MHRA regarding cyproterone acetate: how does this affect prescribing of Co-cyprindiol/Dianette ® for acne/hirsutism? 13 July 2020 Background New data from a French cohort study [1] indicate that use of high dose cyproterone acetate (high dose products contain 50-100mg per tablet) is associated (...) acetate with ethinylestradiol Co-cyprindiol/Dianette ® tablets containing cyproterone acetate with ethinylestradiol are used for treatment of acne and hirsutism in women of reproductive age. In contrast to the high dose products described above, they contain only 2mg of cyproterone acetate; annual cumulative exposure to cyproterone acetate is only about 0.8g. The Yellow Card scheme has received no reports of meningioma associated with use of these low-dose products. The MHRA advises that although

2020 Faculty of Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare

2. Trifarotene (Aklief) - topical treatment of acne vulgaris

Trifarotene (Aklief) - topical treatment of acne vulgaris Search Page - Drug and Health Product Register Language selection Search and menus Search Search website Search Topics menu You are here: Summary Basis of Decision - - Health Canada Expand all Summary Basis of Decision (SBD) for Contact: Summary Basis of Decision (SBD) documents provide information related to the original authorization of a product. The for is located below. Recent Activity for SBDs written for approved after September 1

2020 Health Canada - Drug and Health Product Register

3. Acne vulgaris: Benzoyl peroxide

Acne vulgaris: Benzoyl peroxide Benzoyl peroxide | Prescribing information | Acne vulgaris | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Benzoyl peroxide Acne vulgaris: Benzoyl peroxide Last revised in December 2019 Benzoyl peroxide Benzoyl peroxide Indication and dose for acne vulgaris: For Child 12–17 years — apply to the skin 1–2 times a day, preferably after washing with soap and water and start treatment with lower-strength preparations. For Adult — apply to the skin 1–2 times a day, preferably after (...) peroxide is applied at night and the topical antibiotic in the morning. Avoid using two products that both have an alcoholic base as this may increase skin irritation. A combined proprietary product is available. Benzoyl peroxide combined with a topical retinoid is a useful choice, especially in the maintenance of acne. Apply the products once daily, 12 hours apart (for example the topical retinoid at night and benzoyl peroxide in the morning). Both these drugs can irritate the skin; consider using

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

4. Acne vulgaris: Azelaic acid

Acne vulgaris: Azelaic acid Azelaic acid | Prescribing information | Acne vulgaris | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Azelaic acid Acne vulgaris: Azelaic acid Last revised in December 2019 Azelaic acid How should I prescribe azelaic acid? Indication and dose for acne vulgaris For Child 12–17 years — apply twice daily. In people with sensitive skin, apply once daily for 1 week, then apply twice daily. For Adult — apply twice daily. In people with sensitive skin, apply once daily for 1 week

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

5. Acne vulgaris

Acne vulgaris Acne vulgaris | Topics A to Z | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Acne vulgaris Acne vulgaris Last revised in December 2019 Acne vulgaris is a chronic skin condition in which blockage or inflammation of the hair follicles and accompanying sebaceous glands Diagnosis Management Prescribing information Background information Acne vulgaris: Summary Acne vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory skin condition affecting mainly the face, back and chest - it is characterised by blockage (...) and inflammation of the pilosebaceous unit (the hair follicle, hair shaft and sebaceous gland). It presents with lesions which can be non-inflammatory (comedones), inflammatory (papules, pustules and nodules) or a mixture of both. Up to 95% of adolescents in Western industrialized countries are affected by acne to some extent — 20 to 35% develop moderate or severe acne. Complications of acne include skin changes such as scarring, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation or depigmentation and psychosocial problems

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

6. Trifarotene (Aklief) - acne vulgaris

Trifarotene (Aklief) - acne vulgaris Drug Approval Package: AKLIEF U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Search FDA Submit search Drug Approval Package: AKLIEF Company: Galderma Research and Development, LLC Application Number: 211527 Approval Date: 10/04/2019 Persons with disabilities having problems accessing the PDF files below may call (301) 796-3634 for assistance. FDA Approval Letter and Labeling (PDF) (PDF) FDA Application Review Files (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF

2019 FDA - Drug Approval Package

7. British Association of Dermatologists guidelines for the management of hidradenitis suppurativa (acne inversa)

British Association of Dermatologists guidelines for the management of hidradenitis suppurativa (acne inversa) 4 Fitzroy Square, London W1T 5HQ Tel: 020 7383 0266 Fax: 020 7388 5263 e-mail: admin@bad.org.uk Registered Charity No. 258474 HIDRADENITIS SUPPURATIVA What are the aims of this leaflet? This leaflet has been written to help you understand more about hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). It tells you what it is, what may cause it, what can be done about it, and where you can find out more (...) system is involved in producing inflammation and treatments that reduce the immune system activity may be helpful (see below). ? In a few people with HS there is a link to the bowel condition Crohn ’s disease. ? There may be a link with acne and pilonidal sinus (a chronic abscess at the base of the spine). ? Smoking and obesity are linked with HS, but the condition can also affect non-smokers of normal weight. ? Poor hygiene does not cause hidradenitis suppurativa. Is hidradenitis suppurativa

2019 British Association of Dermatologists

8. Acne vulgaris: What else might it be?

Acne vulgaris: What else might it be? Differential diagnosis | Diagnosis | Acne vulgaris | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Differential diagnosis Acne vulgaris: What else might it be? Last revised in December 2019 What else might it be? The differential diagnosis for acne includes: Rosacea — for more information, see the CKS topic on . Perioral dermatitis . Folliculitis and boils — for more information, see the CKS topic on . Drug-induced acne — some drugs can cause or exacerbate acneiform (...) eruptions including dioxins (chloracne), corticosteroids, anti-epileptics (phenytoin and carbamazepine), lithium, isoniazid, vitamins B1, B6 and B12. Keratosis pilaris . Basis for recommendation The information on the differential diagnosis of acne is based on clinical guidelines Evidence-Based Recommendations for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pediatric Acne [ ], European evidence-based (S3) guideline for the treatment of acne – update 2016 [ ], Guidelines of care for the management of acne vulgaris

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

9. Acne vulgaris: What are the clinical features of acne vulgaris?

Acne vulgaris: What are the clinical features of acne vulgaris? Clinical features | Diagnosis | Acne vulgaris | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Clinical features Acne vulgaris: What are the clinical features of acne vulgaris? Last revised in December 2019 What are the clinical features of acne vulgaris? Acne affects areas of the body with a high density of pilosebaceous glands such as the face, chest and back. Clinical features vary widely depending on severity and the person affected. Comedones (...) clinical practice guideline [ ], A consensus-based practical and daily guide for the treatment of acne patients [ ], European evidence-based (S3) guideline for the treatment of acne – update 2016 [ ], Guidelines of care for the management of acne vulgaris [ ], and Acne: acne vulgaris [ ], and expert opinion in review articles [ ; ; ]. © .

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

10. Acne vulgaris: Topical retinoids

Acne vulgaris: Topical retinoids Topical retinoids | Prescribing information | Acne vulgaris | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Topical retinoids Acne vulgaris: Topical retinoids Last revised in December 2019 Topical retinoids Topical retinoids Indication and dose for mild to moderate acne vulgaris Adapalene and tretinoin are the topical retinoids licenced for use in children over the age of 12 and adults in the UK. Topical isotretinoin is licenced for use in adults only. Application is usually (...) once or twice a day and varies between agents — for information on specific products see the (BNF) and the . If peeling due to use of other irritant acne treatments is present, allow to subside before starting a topical retinoid — discontinue use if severe irritation occurs. Topical retinoids should be used sparingly to cover the whole affected area and not just on visible spots — if the person has sensitive skin, initiate therapy at a lower frequency (for example three times per week) and increase

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

11. Acne vulgaris: Topical antibiotics

Acne vulgaris: Topical antibiotics Topical antibiotics | Prescribing information | Acne vulgaris | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Topical antibiotics Acne vulgaris: Topical antibiotics Last revised in December 2019 Topical antibiotics Topical antibiotics Prescribing issues Topical antibiotics licenced in the UK for treatment of acne vulgaris include clindamycin and erythromycin. Application is usually once or twice a day and varies between agents — for information on specific products see (...) absorption can follow topical application — consider the possibility of interaction. For information on specific products see the and the . The manufacturer's SPC notes that some people prescribed clindamycin solution have suffered drug interaction problems with CYP450 3A4 inducers, including rifampicin, leading to a loss of effectiveness of the rifampicin. Some topical antibacterial preparations for acne containing alcohol may not be suitable for use with benzoyl peroxide. [ ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ] © .

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

12. Acne vulgaris: Scenario: Management of acne vulgaris in primary care

Acne vulgaris: Scenario: Management of acne vulgaris in primary care Scenario: Primary care management | Management | Acne vulgaris | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Scenario: Primary care management Acne vulgaris: Scenario: Management of acne vulgaris in primary care Last revised in December 2019 Scenario: Management of acne vulgaris in primary care From age 12 years onwards. How should I manage a person with acne vulgaris in primary care? Explain the diagnosis and provide patient information (...) -based practical and daily guide for the treatment of acne patients [ ], European evidence-based (S3) guideline for the treatment of acne – update 2016 [ ], Guidelines of care for the management of acne vulgaris [ ], and Acne: acne vulgaris [ ], and expert opinion in review articles [ ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ]. General advice Cleansing — Acne is not caused by poor hygiene. Aggressive washing can aggravate acne and should be avoided [ ; ; ]. Healthy diet — The role of diet in acne remains poorly understood

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

13. Acne vulgaris: Oral antibiotics

Acne vulgaris: Oral antibiotics Oral antibiotics | Prescribing information | Acne vulgaris | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Oral antibiotics Acne vulgaris: Oral antibiotics Last revised in December 2019 Oral antibiotics Oral antibiotics Prescribing issues If acne fails to respond adequately to topical preparations alone an oral antibiotic such as lymecycline or doxycycline (for a maximum of 3 months) can be added. Minocycline is not recommended for use in acne as it is associated (...) with an increased risk of adverse effects such as drug-induced lupus, skin pigmentation and hepatitis. Macrolide antibiotics (such as erythromycin) should generally be avoided due to high levels of P. acnes resistance but can be used if tetracyclines are contraindicated (for example in pregnancy). A topical retinoid (if not contraindicated) or benzoyl peroxide should always be co-prescribed with oral antibiotics to reduce the risk of antibiotic resistance developing. Do not use topical and oral antibiotics

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

14. Acne vulgaris: How should I assess a person with suspected acne vulgaris?

Acne vulgaris: How should I assess a person with suspected acne vulgaris? Assessment | Diagnosis | Acne vulgaris | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Assessment Acne vulgaris: How should I assess a person with suspected acne vulgaris? Last revised in December 2019 How should I assess a person with suspected acne vulgaris? Take a history asking about: Duration, type and distribution of lesions. Previous treatment (including over-the-counter medications) and response. Exacerbating factors (...) guidelines Evidence-Based Recommendations for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pediatric Acne [ ]. Management of acne: Canadian clinical practice guideline [ ], A consensus-based practical and daily guide for the treatment of acne patients [ ], European evidence-based (S3) guideline for the treatment of acne – update 2016 [ ], Guidelines of care for the management of acne vulgaris [ ], and Acne: acne vulgaris [ ], and expert opinion in review articles [ ; ; ; ]. Ask about psychosocial impact Acne

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

15. Acne vulgaris: Combined oral contraceptives

Acne vulgaris: Combined oral contraceptives Combined oral contraceptives | Prescribing information | Acne vulgaris | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Combined oral contraceptives Acne vulgaris: Combined oral contraceptives Last revised in December 2019 Combined oral contraceptives Which combined oral contraceptive should I prescribe? For prescribing information on combined oral contraceptives, see the CKS topic on , the and the . © .

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

16. Sarecycline (Seysara) - To treat inflammatory lesions of non-nodular moderate to severe acne vulgaris in patients 9 years of age and older

Sarecycline (Seysara) - To treat inflammatory lesions of non-nodular moderate to severe acne vulgaris in patients 9 years of age and older Drug Approval Package: Seysara (sarecycline) U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Search FDA Submit search Drug Approval Package: Seysara (sarecycline) Company: Allergan, Inc. Application Number: 209521 Approval Date: 10/01/2018 Persons with disabilities having problems accessing the PDF files below may call (301) 796-3634 for assistance. FDA

2018 FDA - Drug Approval Package

17. Prevalence and psychological impact of Acne vulgaris among female secondary school students in Arar city, Saudi Arabia, in 2018 Full Text available with Trip Pro

Prevalence and psychological impact of Acne vulgaris among female secondary school students in Arar city, Saudi Arabia, in 2018 Acne vulgaris is a common heath problem affecting adolescents with considerable impact on their quality of life.To determine the prevalence of Acne vulgaris and its psychological impact among female secondary school students.A cross-sectional study was conducted during the period from January to March 2018, among all female secondary school students in 3 randomly (...) selected schools, in Arar city (Saudi Arabia). The participants were clinically examined by a dermatologist to identify acne cases. Dermatological quality of life of acne cases were assessed using an Arabic version of Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). Data collected were analyzed by IBM-SPSS version 20, using Chi-square, Fisher's Exact test, Mann-Whitney U, and Kruskal Wallis test. P-value ≤0.05 was considered statically significant.The overall prevalence of Acne vulgaris was 14.3

2018 Electronic physician

18. Acne

. These can be found via searching the site. Top results for acne 1. Acne vulgaris Acne vulgaris - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Acne vulgaris - Summary Acne vulgaris is a chronic skin condition in which blockage or inflammation of the hair follicles and accompanying sebaceous glands (known as pilosebaceous units) occurs. It principally affects the face, the back, and the chest, and usually first occurs around the age of puberty. Acne is most prevalent among adolescents and young adults (...) by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button. An example 2018 7. Acne vulgaris Acne vulgaris - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Acne vulgaris Last reviewed: August 2018 Last updated: June 2018 Summary Acne may affect any age group, but it is most common in adolescents. Lesions consist of non-inflammatory comedones (whiteheads and blackheads) and inflammatory papules, pustules

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

19. Acne

Acne Evidence Maps - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Liberating the literature ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button. An example search might look like (#1 or #2) and (#3 or #4) Loading

2018 Trip Evidence Maps

20. Safety and effectiveness of amoxicillin in the treatment of inflammatory acne Full Text available with Trip Pro

Safety and effectiveness of amoxicillin in the treatment of inflammatory acne Acne is a common skin disease that predominantly affects teenagers and young adults. Systemic antibiotic therapy, including tetracyclines, macrolides, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, is indicated in moderate-to-severe inflammatory disease. However, in certain cases, these antibiotics and other commonly prescribed treatments including oral contraceptives, spironolactone, and isotretinoin may be prohibited (...) , especially in cases of pregnancy and drug intolerance. In this retrospective study, we assessed the safety and efficacy of systemic amoxicillin, which has a favorable tolerability profile and compatibility with pregnancy in the treatment of inflammatory acne.

2018 International journal of women's dermatology