Latest & greatest articles for amoxicillin

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Top results for amoxicillin

81. Treatment of chancroid by clavulanic acid with amoxycillin in patients with beta-lactamase-positive Haemophilus ducreyi infection. (Abstract)

Treatment of chancroid by clavulanic acid with amoxycillin in patients with beta-lactamase-positive Haemophilus ducreyi infection. Multiresistant strains of Haemophilus ducreyi, the aetiological agent of chancroid, are prevalent in Nairobi, Kenya, where tetracyclines and sulphonamides are no longer very effective in the treatment of chancroid. The following regimens (given three times daily for seven days) were compared in a double-blind randomised trial--amoxycillin 500 mg, amoxycillin 500 mg (...) and clavulanic acid 125 mg, and amoxycillin 500 mg and clavulanic acid 250 mg. 68 of 100 ulcers were culture-positive for H. ducreyi. All strains of H. ducreyi produced beta-lactamase. At day 7 none of the amoxycillin-treated patients had responded clinically or bacteriologically, whereas all but 2 of 56 patients treated with an amoxycillin/clavulanic-acid regimen had responded clinically and H. ducreyi had been eradicated from their ulcers. The combination of amoxycillin-clavulanic acid appears to be very

1982 Lancet Controlled trial quality: uncertain

82. Single-dose amoxicillin therapy for urinary tract infection. Multicenter trial using antibody-coated bacteria localization technique. (Abstract)

Single-dose amoxicillin therapy for urinary tract infection. Multicenter trial using antibody-coated bacteria localization technique. Urine specimens from 134 women with acute, uncomplicated urinary tract infection at three medical centers were examined by the antibody-coated bacteria (ACB) assay. Patients with negative assays (suggesting bladder infection alone) were randomized to receive either a single 3-g oral dose of amoxicillin trihydrate or conventional ten-day courses of sulfa (...) -methoxazole-trimethoprim or oral ampicillin sodium. Comparable results were obtained with the three regimens for ACG-negative infection: 90% eradication of the original organism with single-dose amoxicillin, 100% with sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, and 96% with ampicillin. The overall incidence of ACB positivity was 32.1%, ranging from 8% to 63% at the three institutions. This difference seemed to be related to the ease of access to medical care: women with easy access having low rates of ACB positivity

1980 JAMA Controlled trial quality: uncertain

83. Efficacy of single-dose and conventional amoxicillin therapy in urinary-tract infection localized by the antibody-coated bacteria technic. (Abstract)

Efficacy of single-dose and conventional amoxicillin therapy in urinary-tract infection localized by the antibody-coated bacteria technic. Urine specimens from 61 women with symptoms of cystitis who are infected with amoxicillin-sensitive organisms were examined by the antibody-coated bacteria assay. Patients with negative assays were randomized to receive either a single 3-g oral dose of amoxicillin or 10 days of amoxicillin, 250 mg, given by mouth four times per day (conventional therapy (...) ). Patients with positive assays received conventional therapy. All 43 patients without antibody-coated bacteria in the urine, 22 given single-dose therapy and 21 treated conventionally, were cured of their infection. Of 18 patients with antibody-coated bacteria, nine relapsed within one week of completion of conventional therapy. The results of the antibody-coated bacteria assay appear to predict the therapeutic response: both single-dose and conventional amoxicillin therapy are completely successful

1978 NEJM Controlled trial quality: uncertain

84. Comparative trial of amoxycillin and chloramphenicol in treatment of typhoid fever in adults. (Abstract)

Comparative trial of amoxycillin and chloramphenicol in treatment of typhoid fever in adults. A randomised clinical trial in 124 adult patients with typhoid fever, proved by blood culture, showed that amoxycillin in a dosage of 1 g. six-hourly for fourteen days is an alternative to chloramphenicol, which has hitherto been regarded as the drug of choice.

1975 Lancet