Latest & greatest articles for aspirin

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Aspirin

Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) more commonly known as aspirin is a painkiller that has a wide range of uses. It is frequently used to treat fever, mild pain, tooth aches, headaches and muscle aches. Aspirin is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and can be used in the management of conditions such as heart attack, arthritis, blood clots and stroke. Aspirin, has been used for thousands of years, initially extracted from the leaves of willow trees.

Aspirin works in much the same way as other NSAIDs but has additional properties, such as antiplatelet activity which can make it additionally useful. More recently aspirin has been linked with cancer prevention. But the potential benefits of aspirin need to be weighed against the potential side effects, which includes gastrointestinal bleeding and Reye’s syndrome. It should be noted that aspirin should not be used in people who are allergic to drugs such as ibuprofen or a more generalized intolerance to NSAIDs. It should also be used cautiously in asthmatics and/or those with bronchospasm associated with NSAID use.

Research evidence, clinical trials and guidelines on Aspirin

The Trip Database has an extensive collection of articles on aspirin ranging from clinical trials, systematic reviews, clinical guidelines and case reports. These can be found via searching the site.

Top results for aspirin

461. WARFASA: Aspirin for Preventing the Recurrence of Venous Thromboembolism

WARFASA: Aspirin for Preventing the Recurrence of Venous Thromboembolism RXFILES TRIAL SUMMARY MATTHEW SWANKHUIZEN – MAY 2013 – WWW.RXFILES.CA Page 1 of 2 WARFASA: Aspirin for Preventing the Recurrence of Venous Thromboembolism 1 WARFarin and AcetylSalicylic Acid Study BOTTOM LINE • In patients whom have had a first unprovoked VTE with low to moderate bleed risk, the addition of ASA 100 mg daily is reasonable to prevent future DVT not PE or mortality events, if the decision is made to stop VKA (...) ° outcome of arterial event ?Method for diagnosis of recurrent DVT venous compression ultrasonography has a false positive rate of 14% which may have accounted for observed difference ?Slow recruitment of patients took 6 years to complete ?Small very specific sample size UNCERTAINITIES: ?Applicability to non-caucasian individuals ?2012 Chest guidelines suggest VKA therapy for 3 months but minimum in this study was 6 months 2 k =male,2°=Secondary, ARR=Absolute risk reduction, ASA=Acetylsalicylic Acid

2013 RxFiles

462. ASPIRE: Low?Dose Aspirin for Preventing Recurrent Venous Thromboembolism

°=Secondary, ARR=Absolute risk reduction, ASA=Acetylsalicylic Acid, CHD=Coronary heart disease, CVD=Cerebrovascular disease, CV= Cardiovascular,CI=Confidence interval, DVT=Deep vein thrombosis, HR= Harm Ratio,GI=Gastrointestinal, HRT=Hormone replacement therapy, ITT=Intention to treat,INR=International normalized ratio, MI=Myocardial Infarction, NR=Not reported, NS=Non-significant, NNT=Number needed to treat,NNH=Number needed to harm, NSAID= Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, PE=Pulmonary embolism, PUD (...) ASPIRE: Low?Dose Aspirin for Preventing Recurrent Venous Thromboembolism RXFILES TRIAL SUMMARY MATTHEW SWANKHUIZEN – MAY 2013 – WWW.RXFILES.CA Page 1 of 2 ASPIRE: Low-Dose Aspirin for Preventing Recurrent Venous Thromboembolism 1 Aspirin to Prevent Recurrent Venous Thromboembolism BOTTOM LINE • In patients whom have had an unprovoked VTE with low to moderate bleed risk the addition of ASA 100 mg daily is reasonable to prevent future VTE events and major vascular events if the decision is made

2013 RxFiles

463. Cohort study: Lack of association between proton pump inhibitors and adverse events in patients taking clopidogrel and aspirin

Cohort study: Lack of association between proton pump inhibitors and adverse events in patients taking clopidogrel and aspirin Lack of association between proton pump inhibitors and adverse events in patients taking clopidogrel and aspirin | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your (...) username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Lack of association between proton pump inhibitors and adverse events in patients taking clopidogrel and aspirin Article Text Aetiology Cohort study Lack

2013 Evidence-Based Medicine

464. Ischaemic stroke: sometimes thrombolysis and very often aspirin

Ischaemic stroke: sometimes thrombolysis and very often aspirin Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''Ischaemic stroke: sometimes thrombolysis and very often aspirin '', 1 November 2013 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > Ischaemic stroke: sometimes thrombolysis and very often aspirin Spotlight Every month, the subjects in Prescrire’s Spotlight. 100 most recent :  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |  Spotlight Ischaemic stroke: sometimes (...) thrombolysis and very often aspirin In the acute phase of an ischaemic stroke, some patients benefit from thrombolysis when it is administered within 3 hours. Most patients are treated with aspirin. Some 80% of strokes are of ischaemic origin (blocked vessels). Around 12% of patients die within the three months following the stroke, and 20% remain in an institution or are highly dependent. When a person shows symptoms of a stroke, it is advisable to get them to hospital as quickly as possible so they can

2013 Prescrire

465. Vitamin E in Combination With Aspirin Can Pose Potential Postoperative Bleeding

anti-platelet effect of aspirin in combination with vitamin E. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Celestini/2002 Healthy Human (blood) taking no medication. In vitro study Key results The anti-platelet aggregation effect of acetylsalicylic acid was enhanced in presence of vitamin E, by increasing the NO(nitrous oxide) production 42 fold(P #2) Gonzalez-Correa/2005 Whole blood from healthy (...) Surgery) (Periodontics) (Dental Hygiene) Keywords Vitamin E, Acetylsalicylic acid, collagen, antiplatelet aggregation ID# 2440 Date of submission: 04/01/2013 E-mail Heydaris3@livemail.uthscsa.edu Author Soulmaz Heydari Co-author(s) Co-author(s) e-mail Faculty mentor/Co-author Gregory Spackman, DDS, MBA Faculty mentor/Co-author e-mail spackman@uthscsa.edu Basic Science Rationale (Mechanisms that may account for and/or explain the clinical question, i.e. is the answer to the clinical question consistent

2013 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

466. Clopidogrel with aspirin in acute minor stroke or transient ischemic attack. (Full text)

Clopidogrel with aspirin in acute minor stroke or transient ischemic attack. Stroke is common during the first few weeks after a transient ischemic attack (TIA) or minor ischemic stroke. Combination therapy with clopidogrel and aspirin may provide greater protection against subsequent stroke than aspirin alone.In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted at 114 centers in China, we randomly assigned 5170 patients within 24 hours after the onset of minor ischemic stroke (...) or high-risk TIA to combination therapy with clopidogrel and aspirin (clopidogrel at an initial dose of 300 mg, followed by 75 mg per day for 90 days, plus aspirin at a dose of 75 mg per day for the first 21 days) or to placebo plus aspirin (75 mg per day for 90 days). All participants received open-label aspirin at a clinician-determined dose of 75 to 300 mg on day 1. The primary outcome was stroke (ischemic or hemorrhagic) during 90 days of follow-up in an intention-to-treat analysis. Treatment

2013 NEJM Controlled trial quality: predicted high PubMed abstract

467. Randomised controlled trial: Aspirin given for up to 2?years after initial anticoagulant treatment reduces the risk of venous thromboembolism recurrence without increasing risk of major bleeding (Full text)

Randomised controlled trial: Aspirin given for up to 2?years after initial anticoagulant treatment reduces the risk of venous thromboembolism recurrence without increasing risk of major bleeding Aspirin given for up to 2 years after initial anticoagulant treatment reduces the risk of venous thromboembolism recurrence without increasing risk of major bleeding | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your (...) cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Aspirin given for up to 2 years

2013 Evidence-Based Nursing PubMed abstract

468. First update of the current evidence for the management of ankylosing spondylitis with non-pharmacological treatment and non-biologic drugs: a systematic literature review for the ASAS/EULAR management recommendations in ankylosing spondylitis (Abstract)

First update of the current evidence for the management of ankylosing spondylitis with non-pharmacological treatment and non-biologic drugs: a systematic literature review for the ASAS/EULAR management recommendations in ankylosing spondylitis To perform a systematic literature review as a basis for the update of the Assessment in SpondyloArthritis International Society and European League Against Reumatism (ASAS/EULAR) recommendations for the management of AS with non-pharmacological (...) including coxibs improve BASDAI, disease activity and BASFI. No effect of SSZ and MTX on any variable was found. Surgical interventions of the spine and the hip can give excellent results by restoring function.This concise summary of current evidence for non-pharmacological interventions and non-biologic drugs formed the basis for the update of the ASAS/EULAR recommendations for the management of AS.

2013 EvidenceUpdates

469. Use of clopidogrel with or without aspirin in patients taking oral anticoagulant therapy and undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: an open-label, randomised, controlled trial. (Abstract)

Use of clopidogrel with or without aspirin in patients taking oral anticoagulant therapy and undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: an open-label, randomised, controlled trial. If percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is required in patients taking oral anticoagulants, antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel is indicated, but such triple therapy increases the risk of serious bleeding. We investigated the safety and efficacy of clopidogrel alone compared with clopidogrel (...) plus aspirin.We did an open-label, multicentre, randomised, controlled trial in 15 centres in Belgium and the Netherlands. From November, 2008, to November, 2011, adults receiving oral anticoagulants and undergoing PCI were assigned clopidogrel alone (double therapy) or clopidogrel plus aspirin (triple therapy). The primary outcome was any bleeding episode within 1 year of PCI, assessed by intention to treat. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00769938.573 patients were

2013 Lancet Controlled trial quality: predicted high

470. Systematic review with meta-analysis: Aspirin prophylaxis in people without prior cardiovascular disease does not lead to reductions in cardiovascular death or cancer mortality

Systematic review with meta-analysis: Aspirin prophylaxis in people without prior cardiovascular disease does not lead to reductions in cardiovascular death or cancer mortality Aspirin prophylaxis in people without prior cardiovascular disease does not lead to reductions in cardiovascular death or cancer mortality | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time (...) . To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Aspirin prophylaxis in people without prior cardiovascular disease does

2013 Evidence-Based Medicine

471. Randomised controlled trial: Thromboprophylaxis in heart failure patients with sinus rhythm: aspirin and warfarin lead to similar cardiovascular outcomes

Randomised controlled trial: Thromboprophylaxis in heart failure patients with sinus rhythm: aspirin and warfarin lead to similar cardiovascular outcomes Thromboprophylaxis in heart failure patients with sinus rhythm: aspirin and warfarin lead to similar cardiovascular outcomes | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use (...) cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Thromboprophylaxis in heart failure patients with sinus rhythm: aspirin and warfarin lead to similar

2013 Evidence-Based Medicine

472. Cohort study: Low-dose aspirin is associated with an increased risk of haemorrhage; but not in people with diabetes who have a high baseline rate of bleeding

Cohort study: Low-dose aspirin is associated with an increased risk of haemorrhage; but not in people with diabetes who have a high baseline rate of bleeding Low-dose aspirin is associated with an increased risk of haemorrhage; but not in people with diabetes who have a high baseline rate of bleeding | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more (...) about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Low-dose aspirin is associated with an increased risk of haemorrhage; but not in people

2013 Evidence-Based Nursing

473. Aspirin in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease and cancer: a systematic review of the balance of evidence from reviews of randomized trials. (Full text)

Aspirin in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease and cancer: a systematic review of the balance of evidence from reviews of randomized trials. Aspirin has been recommended for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer, but overall benefits are unclear. We aimed to use novel methods to re-evaluate the balance of benefits and harms of aspirin using evidence from randomised controlled trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses.Data sources included ten electronic (...) were increased by 37% for gastrointestinal bleeds (RR 1.37, 95% CI: 1.15-1.62), 54%-66% for major bleeds (Rate Ratio from IPD analysis 1.54, 95% CI: 1.30-1.82, and RR 1.62, 95% CI: 1.31-2.00), and 32%-38% for haemorrhagic stroke (Rate Ratio from IPD analysis 1.32; 95% CI: 1.00-1.74; RR 1.38; 95% CI: 1.01-1.82).Findings indicate small absolute effects of aspirin relative to the burden of these diseases. When aspirin is used for primary prevention of CVD the absolute harms exceed the benefits

2013 PloS one PubMed abstract

474. Aspirin for prophylactic use in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease and cancer: a systematic review and overview of reviews. (Full text)

Aspirin for prophylactic use in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease and cancer: a systematic review and overview of reviews. Prophylactic aspirin has been considered to be beneficial in reducing the risks of heart disease and cancer. However, potential benefits must be balanced against the possible harm from side effects, such as bleeding and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. It is particularly important to know the risk of side effects when aspirin is used as primary prevention (...) --that is when used by people as yet free of, but at risk of developing, cardiovascular disease (CVD) or cancer. In this report we aim to identify and re-analyse randomised controlled trials (RCTs), systematic reviews and meta-analyses to summarise the current scientific evidence with a focus on possible harms of prophylactic aspirin in primary prevention of CVD and cancer.To identify RCTs, systematic reviews and meta-analyses of RCTs of the prophylactic use of aspirin in primary prevention of CVD or cancer

2013 Health technology assessment (Winchester, England) PubMed abstract

475. Aspirin with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine headaches in adults. (Full text)

Aspirin with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine headaches in adults. This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 4, 2010 (Kirthi 2010). Migraine is a common, disabling condition and a burden for the individual, health services and society. Many sufferers choose not to, or are unable to, seek professional help and rely on over-the-counter analgesics. Co-therapy with an antiemetic should help to reduce nausea and vomiting commonly associated (...) with migraine headaches.To determine the efficacy and tolerability of aspirin, alone or in combination with an antiemetic, compared to placebo and other active interventions in the treatment of acute migraine headaches in adults.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Oxford Pain Relief Database, ClinicalTrials.gov, and reference lists for studies through 10 March 2010 for the original review and to 31 January 2013 for the update.We included randomised

2013 Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) PubMed abstract

476. Gastrointestinal adverse effects of short-term aspirin use: a meta-analysis of published randomized controlled trials. (Full text)

Gastrointestinal adverse effects of short-term aspirin use: a meta-analysis of published randomized controlled trials. Aspirin is widely used for short-term treatment of pain, fever or colds, but there are only limited data regarding the safety of this use. To summarize the available data on this topic, we conducted a meta-analysis of the published clinical trial literature regarding the gastrointestinal adverse effects of short-term use of aspirin in comparison with placebo and other (...) medications commonly used for the same purpose.An extensive literature search identified 119,310 articles regarding possible adverse effects of aspirin, among which 23,131 appeared to possibly include relevant data. An automated text-mining procedure was used to score the references for potential relevance for the meta-analysis. The 3,983 highest-scoring articles were reviewed individually to identify those with data that could be included in this analysis. Ultimately, 78 relevant articles were identified

2013 Drugs in R&D PubMed abstract

477. Aspirin therapy and risk of subdural hematoma: meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials. (Abstract)

Aspirin therapy and risk of subdural hematoma: meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials. Subdural hematomas are an important bleeding complication of antithrombotic therapies. We sought to characterize the risk of subdural hematoma associated with antiplatelet therapy.Trials were gathered from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and from recent meta-analyses of trials regarding antiplatelet therapy for the primary prevention of stroke. Randomized trials published since 1980 (...) comparing antiplatelet therapy with placebo or control and reporting subdural hematoma were included in the analysis. For recent large trials that did not report subdural hematomas, unpublished results were sought. Two reviewers independently extracted data on study design and subdural hematomas, with differences resolved by joint review and consensus.Four published trials were identified that compared aspirin with placebo/control involving 6565 participants (mean age 66 years) with 8 total subdural

2013 Journal of stroke and cerebrovascular diseases : the official journal of National Stroke Association

478. Low-dose acetylsalicylic acid use and the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding: A meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials and observational studies. (Full text)

Low-dose acetylsalicylic acid use and the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding: A meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials and observational studies. Low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (LDA, 75 mg/day to 325 mg/day) is recommended for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events, but has been linked to an increased risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB).To analyze the magnitude of effect of LDA use on UGIB risk.The PubMed and Embase databases were searched for randomized

2013 Canadian journal of gastroenterology = Journal canadien de gastroenterologie PubMed abstract

479. Effect of addition of clopidogrel to aspirin on stroke incidence: Meta-analysis of randomized trials. (Full text)

Effect of addition of clopidogrel to aspirin on stroke incidence: Meta-analysis of randomized trials. It remains controversial whether dual antiplatelet therapy reduces stroke more than aspirin alone.We aimed to assess the effects of adding clopidogrel to aspirin on the occurrence of stroke and major haemorrhage in patients with vascular disease.Meta-analysis of published randomized trials comparing the combination of clopidogrel and aspirin vs. aspirin alone that reported stroke and major (...) ); there was a nonsignificant 12% increase in intracerebral haemorrhage (odds ratio = 1·12, 95% confidence interval 0·86-1·46). Among 1930 participants with recent (<30 days) brain ischemia from four trials, stroke was reduced by 33% (odds ratio = 0·67, 95% confidence interval 0·46-0·97) by dual antiplatelet therapy vs. aspirin alone. The risk of major bleeding was increased by 40% (odds ratio = 1·40, 95% confidence interval 1·26-1·55) by dual antiplatelet therapy.This meta-analysis demonstrates a substantial relative risk

2013 International journal of stroke : official journal of the International Stroke Society PubMed abstract

480. Warfarin versus Aspirin for Prevention of Stroke in Heart Failure: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials. (Abstract)

Warfarin versus Aspirin for Prevention of Stroke in Heart Failure: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials. There is clinical equipoise between warfarin and aspirin for stroke prevention in patients with heart failure in sinus rhythm (SR). The objective of this meta-analysis was to pool risk estimates for stroke, mortality, and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) from published clinical randomized controlled trials (RCTs).MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and clinicaltrials.gov (...) were searched for English-language RCTs comparing warfarin to aspirin in heart failure through May 2012. Pooled relative risk (RR) was calculated from a random-effects model.Four RCTs (n=3681) met the criteria for study inclusion. Warfarin was associated with a lower risk of stroke compared with aspirin (pooled RR, .59; 95% confidence interval [CI], .41-.85; P=.004). The number needed to treat (NNT) was 61. There was no difference between warfarin and aspirin in mortality (pooled RR, 1; 95% CI, .88

2013 Journal of stroke and cerebrovascular diseases : the official journal of National Stroke Association