Latest & greatest articles for calcium

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Top results for calcium

341. Reduction of blood pressure with calcium supplementation in young adults. (Abstract)

Reduction of blood pressure with calcium supplementation in young adults. Epidemiologic and animal studies have suggested an inverse relationship between calcium intake and BP. Furthermore, calcium intake seems to be inversely correlated with the incidence of eclampsia in pregnancy. In a randomized clinical trial, young adults were allocated to a calcium-supplemented group receiving 1 g/day of elemental calcium (15 men and 15 women) or a placebo group (14 women and 13 men) for a period of 22 (...) weeks. The calcium-supplemented group showed a significant decrease in diastolic BP; this effect was stabilized after nine weeks in women and six weeks in men. The reduction in diastolic BP was 5.6% and 9% from the initial values for women and men, respectively. This study supports epidemiologic and animal evidence of the effect of calcium intake on BP and suggests the need for more research exploring the mechanisms involved in the observed effect.

1983 JAMA Controlled trial quality: uncertain

342. Effects of dichloromethylene diphosphonate on skeletal mobilization of calcium in multiple myeloma. (Abstract)

Effects of dichloromethylene diphosphonate on skeletal mobilization of calcium in multiple myeloma. Dichloromethylene diphosphonate (Cl2MDP), an inhibitor of oestoclast activity, was evaluated for its ability to decrease the excessive mobilization of skeletal calcium that complicates multiple myeloma. Ten patients with active myeloma, wide-spread bone disease, and hypercalciuria were studied in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover-designed trial in which they took Cl2MDP for eight (...) weeks and placebos for eight weeks. Two patients died during the placebo phase; of eight patients who received Cl2MDP, seven had rapid, sustained, and highly significant (P less than 0.001) decreases in urinary excretion of calcium. Six also had significant decreases in hydroxyproline excretion, and five reported lessening of skeletal pain. On patient did not respond. Although the patients received concurrent chemotherapy during the study, concentrations of myeloma proteins actually increased

1980 NEJM Controlled trial quality: uncertain

343. Multiple-myeloma bone disease. The comparative effect of sodium fluoride and calcium carbonate or placebo. (Abstract)

Multiple-myeloma bone disease. The comparative effect of sodium fluoride and calcium carbonate or placebo. A randomized double-blind study was carried out in 26 patients with multiple myeloma to compare the therapeutic effect of sodium fluoride (50 mg twice daily) plus calcium carbonate (1 g four times daily) and placebo. All patients also received melphalan and prednisone for one week every six weeks. Bone biopsies for microradiography and histology, and videodensitometry as well (...) as conventional roentgenograms, 99mTc-polyphosphate bone scans, and bone densitometry of the mid and distal radius, were done initially and one year after therapy. Microradiography and videodensitometry studies revealed significant increases in bone formation (P less than 0.01) and bone mass (P less than 0.005) in the fluoride-calcium group. Bone trabeculae appeared thickened on roentgenograms of six of 13 fluoride-calcium-treated patients (P less than 0.02). Technetium bone scans and bone densitometry

1975 NEJM Controlled trial quality: uncertain